×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Soft Bulletin
     

The Soft Bulletin

4.7 6
by The Flaming Lips
 

See All Formats & Editions

Oklahoma's cloud-hopping psychedelic rockers the Flaming Lips have done some amazing things in their lengthy career -- from performing one of the weirdest alt-rock hits of all time (1993's "She Don't Use Jelly") on "Beverly Hills 90120" to recording a four-disc set meant to be played all at the same time. But nothing they've done to date will amaze fans old and new

Overview

Oklahoma's cloud-hopping psychedelic rockers the Flaming Lips have done some amazing things in their lengthy career -- from performing one of the weirdest alt-rock hits of all time (1993's "She Don't Use Jelly") on "Beverly Hills 90120" to recording a four-disc set meant to be played all at the same time. But nothing they've done to date will amaze fans old and new like this symphonic, classic-rock love letter to life itself. From the first sweeping, string-soaked notes of "Race for the Prize (Remix)" to the moment later on the album when singer Wayne Coyne yelps, "I stood up and I said, 'yeah!' " this is one of the most angelically uplifting psych-rock records of the decade -- a PET SOUNDS for the year 2000. Coyne's dappled lyrics of self-discovery are a better emotional tonic than a year of high-priced therapy, and when drummer Steven Drozd careens in behind him with snare slaps as big as the whole outdoors, you'll feel as if you'll never have a care again. Like a cross between Lynyrd Skynyrd's southern rock and the spaced-out musings of Mercury Rev, songs like the massively rocking "Buggin' (Remix)," the melancholically pretty "Superman," and the subtle, funky "Suddenly Everything Has Changed" are like little escape hatches to a world of endless reverie.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Jason Ankeny
So where does a band go after releasing the most defiantly experimental record of its career? If you're the Flaming Lips, you keep rushing headlong into the unknown -- The Soft Bulletin, their follow-up to the four-disc gambit Zaireeka, is in many ways their most daring work yet, a plaintively emotional, lushly symphonic pop masterpiece eons removed from the mind-warping noise of their past efforts. Though more conventional in concept and scope than Zaireeka, The Soft Bulletin clearly reflects its predecessor's expansive sonic palette. Its multidimensional sound is positively celestial, a shape-shifting pastiche of blissful melodies, heavenly harmonies, and orchestral flourishes; but for all its headphone-friendly innovations, the music is still amazingly accessible, never sacrificing popcraft in the name of radical experimentation. (Its aims are so perversely commercial, in fact, that hit R&B remixer Peter Mokran tinkered with the cuts "Race for the Prize" and "Waitin' for a Superman" in the hopes of earning mainstream radio attention.) But what's most remarkable about The Soft Bulletin is its humanity -- these are Wayne Coyne's most personal and deeply felt songs, as well as the warmest and most giving. No longer hiding behind surreal vignettes about Jesus, zoo animals, and outer space, Coyne pours his heart and soul into each one of these tracks, poignantly exploring love, loss, and the fate of all mankind; highlights like "The Spiderbite Song" and "Feeling Yourself Disintegrate" are so nakedly emotional and transcendentally spiritual that it's impossible not to be moved by their beauty. There's no telling where the Lips will go from here, but it's almost beside the point -- not just the best album of 1999, The Soft Bulletin might be the best record of the entire decade.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/22/1999
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624687627
catalogNumber:
46876
Rank:
10343

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Soft Bulletin 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Guys should never say the word ¿beautiful,¿ unless (1) it gets them in someone¿s underpants (2) it¿s used to describe an unbelievable sports play when ¿awesome¿ wouldn¿t suffice or (3) it¿s used to describe the unbelievable girl we can never attain. Using ¿beautiful¿ under any other circumstance is the equivalent of wearing pink lingerie while watching ¿Will and Grace¿ with a vegetarian dinner baking in the oven. Despite these set-in-stone facts, it is with great confidence and assurance in this CD that I can boldly say The Flaming Lips ¿Soft Bulletin¿ album is beautiful. It¿s not just beautiful. It¿s acoustically gorgeous. It¿s the Kristin Kreuk of music. I¿m madly in love with this CD. Buying a great CD, financially speaking is a double-edged sword. Take for example, my purchase of Haven¿s ¿Between the Senses.¿ It was a nice bargain, because for $12, I got great enjoyment and endless replay value. But with that bargain arose unavoidable costs. After I buy a magical CD, there is my obsessive need to recapture that magic in another CD. Sometimes I think my investments in music are based solely on the need to feel the wonder and joy of recapturing that perfect CD. The drawbacks of this can be devastating to my already emaciated wallet. Take for example again, Haven. Well, since it was produced by Johnny Marr, and since I wanted to recapture the joy of rediscovering Haven, I went out and wasted hard-earned cash on Johnny Marr¿s ¿Boomslang.¿ It sucked. The Music Gods only allot us a few ¿rediscoveries¿ a year. Only a handful of albums kick butt and it is our job to find them. For me it started thirteen years ago in fifth grade with Guns N¿ Roses ¿Appetite for Destruction.¿ A few months later, I rediscovered the ¿Paradise City¿ magic in Bon Jovi¿s ¿Slippery When Wet.¿ Well, the Music Gods literally came down from the sky and touched me with this one. The Flaming Lips ¿Soft Bulletin¿ not only kicks your butt ¿ it kicks your butt, pisses on you, and then takes your lunch money. I¿ve never heard anything like this. It¿s music straight outta heaven. It¿s part pop, part alternative rock, part techno, part symphony, part choir, part progressive rock, part big band, part piano concerto, and is completely beautiful. It knocked me out on so many levels. The driving beats are addictive. The singer¿s voice is sentimental and memorable. The layering is done so well that I rediscovered something new with each listen. The lyrics are philosophical and thoughtful. For example, ¿Will the fight for our sanity be the fight of our lives now that we¿ve lost all the reasons that we thought that we had.¿ Or ¿When you got that spider bite on your hand I thought¿.to lose your arm would surely upset your brain, the poison then could reach your heart from a vein. I was glad it didn¿t destroy you, how sad that would be, cause if it destroyed you it would destroy me.¿ Seriously, these lyrics blow away all the generic stuff today. Given my growing tastes in music, I can honestly proclaim the Flaming Lips ¿Soft Bulletin¿ is the best CD I¿ve purchased to date. Did you ever laugh out loud when sober for no particular reason except that you were really happy and not because something was funny? I didn¿t either until I listened to this CD. (actually I did when I watched ¿Donnie Darko¿ ten times in two weeks. That movie made me understand how Quentin Tarantino can say, ¿I¿m happy to love a movie (Chungking Express) this much.¿ This band from Oklahoma is everything that American radio needs to be (original and inspired.) It¿s everything that current Brit Pop needs to be (energetic and catchy.) On a track note, ¿Waiting for a Superman¿ a song about carrying burdens may be the most beautiful song in the history of songs. ¿Feeling Yourself Disintegrate¿ has one of the most creative intros ever. ¿The Gash¿ is a battle hymn that rocks like no other. ¿Buggin¿ is one of the best remakes I¿ve heard, and it¿s about bugs and mosquitoes....how awesome. I can go o
Guest More than 1 year ago
All I can say is that this CD takes me back to places I forgot. Lyrics aside, I found myself on snow-covered playgrounds, inside museums, and inside an interactive planetarium. It just makes me nostalgic for some reason. Just get this CD, it sparkles with life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago