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Soft Parade [Bonus Tracks]
     

The Soft Parade [Bonus Tracks]

4.0 3
by The Doors
 

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The most uneven studio album recorded with Jim Morrison in the group, partially because their experiments with brass and strings on about half the tracks weren't entirely successful. More to the point, though, this was their weakest overall set of material, low lights including filler like "Do It" and "Runnin' Blue," a strange

Overview

The most uneven studio album recorded with Jim Morrison in the group, partially because their experiments with brass and strings on about half the tracks weren't entirely successful. More to the point, though, this was their weakest overall set of material, low lights including filler like "Do It" and "Runnin' Blue," a strange bluegrass-soul blend that was a small hit. On the other hand, about half the record is quite good, especially the huge hit "Touch Me" (their most successful integration of orchestration), the vicious hard rock riffs of "Wild Child," the overlooked "Shaman's Blues," and the lengthy title track, a multi-part suite that was one of the band's best attempts to mix rock with poetry. "Tell All the People" and "Wishful Sinful," both penned by Robbie Krieger, were uncharacteristically wistful tunes that became small hits.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/27/2007
Label:
Rhino
UPC:
0081227999810
catalogNumber:
101187
Rank:
38648

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Doors   Primary Artist
Curtis Amy   Saxophone,Soloist
Jim Morrison   Vocals,Group Member
Ray Manzarek   Keyboards,Group Member
John Densmore   Drums,Group Member
Jesse McReynolds   Mandolin
Reinol Andino   Conga
George Bohannon   Trombone,Soloist
Champ Webb   English Horn,Soloist
Robby Krieger   Guitar,Vocals,Group Member

Technical Credits

Doors   Composer
Jim Morrison   Arranger,Composer
Ray Manzarek   Arranger,Composer
Pete Shelley   Composer
John Densmore   Arranger,Composer
Bruce Botnick   Engineer,Liner Notes
Hugh Brown   Art Direction
Paul Rothchild   Producer,Audio Production
David Fricke   Liner Notes
William S. Harvey   Art Direction
Peter Schaumann   Illustrations
Jimmy Hole   Art Direction
Paul "Blind Man" Harris   Orchestral Arrangements
Robby Krieger   Arranger,Composer

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The Soft Parade 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was 1969, and the Doors had three albums out - an amazingly unique and classic debut, and two very good ones that followed. However, from all accounts at the time, the group wanted to sort of move away from the 'eerie, depressing' Doors sound to something a little more contemporary and wider-reaching (commercial, if you will). Despite the negative criticism of the addition of brass and strings to some of 'The Soft Parade' tracks, I think it was a brilliant idea, and also think it's their second-best album (the debut being #1 of course). Sure, in 1969, the concept of brass (and other orchestral instruments) incorporated with rock groups was the order of the day for certain acts - Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Chicago being prime examples. Applied to the Doors, it takes some of the heavy-handedness of Morrison's vocals off in favor of a brighter, snappier arrangement ("Tell All the People", "Touch Me") and even w/o the added instrumentation, the rest of the album is unlike anything the Doors did before - it's their funniest album (such a thing can be said about the Doors) ... Listen again to "The Soft Parade" and, despite Morrison's neo-prophetic message, tell me you haven't chuckled at the "champion socks" and "catacombs/nursery bones" movements, before 'the monk bought lunch'! The title track is simulatenously a serious theater/poetry piece, and downright hilarious and comedic. Also, "Easy Ride" has to be the goofiest sounding Doors track (love to hear a country artist cover it, but I doubt any of them would understand "costume of control/excitement soon unfold"!)
Andy_Brandt More than 1 year ago
I hate this album because of the first song. Very annoying and gets in my head too easily. Otherwise a fine Doors albums. Not their top album but some very good songs. Direct transfer by Steve Hoffman. As clean as it gets. Hear new details in songs you've heard tons of times.