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The Suburban Racial Dilemma: Housing and Neighborhoods
     

The Suburban Racial Dilemma: Housing and Neighborhoods

by W. Keating
 

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"[Keating] chronicles efforts to break down suburban racial barriers in housing throughout the United States.... Keating's data also point up our urgent need to focus public policy on depopulated and increasingly impoverished and homogeneous urban centers. As he convincingly demonstrates, private and government attempts at suburban integration, as well as special

Overview

"[Keating] chronicles efforts to break down suburban racial barriers in housing throughout the United States.... Keating's data also point up our urgent need to focus public policy on depopulated and increasingly impoverished and homogeneous urban centers. As he convincingly demonstrates, private and government attempts at suburban integration, as well as special urban integrationist projects, have achieved spotty results at best." --Publishers Weekly Whether through affirmative housing policies or mandatory legislation, there have been numerous efforts to integrate America's neighborhoods, especially the historically white, affluent suburbs. Though much of suburbia has rejected such measures out of a fear of losing their communities to an influx of low-income, inner-city, and primarily African American residents, several metropolitan areas have been successful in creating greater racial diversity. W. Dennis Keating documents the desirability, feasibility, and legality of implementing housing diversity policies in the suburbs. At the heart of this book is the troubling dilemma that the private housing market will inevitably resist race-conscious policies that can be effective only if embraced and supported by individual home buyers and renters, politicians, realtors, financial institutions, and insurers. In the Cleveland, Ohio, metropolitan area, pro-integrative policies have resulted in some examples of long-term racial diversity, particularly in Cleveland Heights and Shaker Heights. Keating compares Cleveland's suburbs to suburbs around the country that have both failed and succeeded in reducing housing discrimination. While there have been occasional fair housing victories over the last three decades, Keating's analysis points toward strategies for greater progress in the future.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In 1968, LBJ's Kerner Commission famously said we were becoming ``two increasingly separate Americas,'' one black and one white. But most people don't remember what else the commission, set up in the midst of the country's worst urban riots in this century, predicted: that within 20 years we'd become ``a white society principally united in suburbs, in smaller central cities, and in the peripheral parts of large central cities; and a Negro society largely concentrated within large central cities.'' Today, over half the population lives in 39 metropolitan areas--with most blacks living in the central cities and most whites in the suburbs. Here, Cleveland State University law professor Keating describes community and government attempts at healing this suburban-urban racial divide. He chronicles efforts to break down suburban racial barriers in housing throughout the United States, but focuses on Cleveland, which joins Chicago and Detroit as the nation's most segregated metropolitan areas. Although the country's many failures and few successes at suburban housing integration are carefully profiled here, Keating's data also points up our urgent need to focus public policy on depopulated and increasingly impoverished and homogeneous urban centers. As he convincingly demonstrates, private and government attempts at suburban integration, as well as special urban integrationist projects have achieved spotty results at best. What's needed is a rethinking of metropolitan policy. While that's beyond Keating's scope here, his book usefully illustrates some of our current policy's intractable problems. (May)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439905395
Publisher:
Temple University Press
Publication date:
06/10/2010
Series:
Conflicts In Urban & Regional
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Formerly a staff attorney at the National Housing Law Project, University of California at Berkeley, W. Dennis Keating is Professor of Law and Urban Planning and Associate Dean of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University. He is co-author of Housing and Community Development: Cases and Materials.

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