The Teaching Hospital: Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Evolution of Academic Medicine

The Teaching Hospital: Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Evolution of Academic Medicine

Hardcover(New Edition)

$37.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Tuesday, November 28 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Teaching Hospital: Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Evolution of Academic Medicine 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
A_Sloan More than 1 year ago
Medical Milestone and American Innovation If you had any question about legitimacy of Brigham and Women's Hospital as a landmark medical institution in the United States, Peter Tishler's "The Teaching Hospital" will set you straight. This fascinating story details the medical innovation that got its start at this world-class hospital. Co-editors Loscalzo and Wenc help bring to light the fact that American medical education was a "sorry affair" that actually "had very little to do with hospitals." First, readers should know that this book is steeped in rich history. It begins before the hospital was founded in 1913, and shows us the magnificent transformation to one of the first schools with a residency program. The comprehensive nature of this book encompasses everything from the school's famous firsts (it boasts the country's first maternity ward) to its more recent landmarks in medical history. What makes this book more exciting is that it features contributions from almost 100 people with expansive history of the hospital: doctors, nurses, historians, and more. Readers might compare it to Sander Gilman's Seeing the Insane in terms of research; however, Tishler's book offers a comprehensive and focused look at one very significant American institution. "The Teaching Hospital" will learn you impressed with Brigham and Women's Hospital. Tishler has obviously found himself enamored by the facility and its transformation "from conception, to realization, to reconception." It is certainly a historical volume worth reading.