The Thirty-Ninth Victim: A Memoir

The Thirty-Ninth Victim: A Memoir

by Arleen Williams

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Overview

The Thirty-Ninth Victim: A Memoir by Arleen Williams

The Green River murders were headline news throughout the 1980s. By the time the perpetrator was finally arrested over twenty years later, at least 48 young women had been killed in the worst serial murder case in history.

In THE THIRTY-NINTH VICTIM, Arleen Williams tells the story of her family's journey before and after the Green River killer murdered her youngest sister and offers a window into the family dynamics behind this life-altering tragedy. The redemptive power of finding and facing truth are at the heart of this powerful memoir.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781717582072
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 04/29/2018
Pages: 224
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.51(d)

About the Author

Arleen Williams is a novelist, memoirist, and co-author of a dozen short books in easy English for adults. She teaches English as a Second Language at South Seattle College where she has worked with immigrants and refugees for over three decades. www.arleenwilliams.com

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The Thirty-Ninth Victim 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Oh, my, what a disturbing memoir this is. Not solely because of the murder of the author's sister by the infamous Green River Killer -- which would be plenty creepy enough for any true crime book, or even murder mystery -- but because Arleen Williams presents us with an achingly honest look at absence, longing, and denial within a family waiting years for what the media dismissively calls closure. What struck me most about this story is that, unlike so many books about particularly horrific crimes, the victim here comes alive on the page. Not as yet another in an almost unimaginably long list of murdered women 'so long, in fact, that it sparked the nationwide Take Back the Night rallies' or as merely an object to be acted upon with violence, but as a vibrant light abruptly, inconceivably snuffed. And as part of a family so deeply attached to its own self-image as normal that even a daughter's disappearance is allowed to disrupt it. Powerful stuff. Chilling -- all the more so for being so well-written . 'And yes, for you fans of close-up crime recreations, there was one scene that I'm quite positive is going to give me nightmares for years to come.'