The Unwritten, Volume 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity

The Unwritten, Volume 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity

Paperback

$13.57 $14.99 Save 9% Current price is $13.57, Original price is $14.99. You Save 9%.
View All Available Formats & Editions

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781401225650
Publisher: DC Comics
Publication date: 01/12/2010
Pages: 144
Product dimensions: 6.66(w) x 10.18(h) x 0.34(d)

About the Author

Tom Taylor is more than just the son of one of the world’s most popular authors and the namesake of his most beloved creation, the boy wizard Tommy Taylor. He’s a living weapon in a literal war of words, in which a shadowy cabal uses the power of storytelling itself to shape the world according to their own dark designs. And he was born and bred to close the book on them forever. But now his own story is headed for it’s most dangerous twist yet – a real whale of a tale.
 
In order to harness his extraordinary powers, Tom must sail the seas of one of the greatest stories ever told, and hunt the white whale that has left countless stories of myth and madness in its wake. Meanwhile, his friends are hunted by a dangerous new enemy and facing identity crises of their own. Will Tom’s voyage lead them all to the answer they seek? Or will he drown in the depths of a thousand and one unhappy endings?
 
In The Unwritten: Leviathan, acclaimed storytellers Mike Carey and Peter Gross delve deeper than eve r before into their frightening, fascinating world!

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Unwritten, Volume 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
TastyCannibal More than 1 year ago
I loved the concept for this book, and it was executed very well. The art is classic to comic book style, with some new touches similar to the walking dead. The entire book is in color, and with very good color concept. A little short, but it makes you want the next volume right away. Barnes & Noble delivers once more.
collingsruth on LibraryThing 7 months ago
While I know a lot of people have liked this for its writing, after reading Fables and Jasper Fforde's books I have a hard time wanting to read another story about fictional characters come to life. Plus the protagonist is whiny.
MeditationesMartini on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Tommy Taylor is the hero of a series of books loosely based on Harry Potter, but even more popular. Tom Taylor is the son of the writer of the series, abandoned as a child and now trying to figure out why his life is feeling more and more like that of a certain fictional wizard. Totally creepy, totally unfinished (not written for the TPB at all), with an intriguing epilogue centring around Rudyard Kipling that reveals a lot of what's going on here and sets us up nicely for vol. 2. Dark, clever metafiction, decent enough for me to be interested in seeing where this one goes.
ryvre on LibraryThing 7 months ago
I work at a comic shop, and this is the one series that all of my coworkers and I have in common. It is a fun, smart read. It's the best new series to come from Vertigo since Air. I recommend it to everyone looking to try something new.
Girl_Detective on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Tom Taylor is the son of a famous fantasy writer, Wilson Taylor. Wilson wrote 13 books about a magical kid named Tommy Taylor. (All similarities to Harry Potter are deliberate.) Most fans assume that Tom was the model for Tommy, and it's he who makes the fantasy convention circuit, as Wilson disappeared, or perhaps deserted Tom, many years ago. Tom wants to be a regular guy, but the shadow cast from his father's book is long. It gets longer when Tom's identity as Wilson's son is called into question. Things get stranger when he's kidnapped by someone claiming to be Tommy's nemesis from the books. Unwritten explores the boundary between what is story and what is real, and the relation of writers to their stories. There's fascinating stuff going on here--postmodern literature, fantasy, and horror. This first volume lays the foundation for what feels to be a big, complex, sprawling story. I look forward to the next installment, and am not sure I'm going to wait for the collection; I may need to buy the individual issues.
mikewick on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Imagine if the last book of Harry Potter went unwritten because the author mysteriously vanished; and imagine that the son of said author is, being the person the book¿s hero was patterned on, cashing in on the legacy his absent father created. Enter the mystery: the son doesn¿t seem to exist at all, there having been no record of his birth, school records, etc. What ensues is a literary thriller that¿s sure to interest fans of other high-art Vertigo titles like Neil Gaiman¿s Sandman and Bill Willingham¿s Fables.
dknippling on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Dang. It was like someone crawled into my head and found out what my best of hypothetical comic books would be, then wrote it. The kid who supposedly inspired his dad's Harry Potteresque stories has to carry on after his dad inexplicably disappears, after his dad forces him to memories all kinds of literary landmarks. Where George Orwell got his inspiration for the Ministry of Truth. The house where Frankenstein started. Now he finds out that he might not be his father's son at all, but a kidnapping victim, while being chased by characters out of "his" books...Metafiction at its best :)
rores28 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
A fast-paced and engrossing story that is immediately permeated with mystery. The concept (or at least what one can ascertain of it) while intriguing outstrips the rather forced character development, which depicts the protagonist, Tommy Tayler,as unrealistically vacillatory in his credulity / fervent skepticism of magical and cabalistic happenings. Unfortunately none of the other characters are really developed at all. Carey shrouds the story in so much mystery that it is difficult to connect with any of the characters who I find myself not caring for a one. SI will likely read the next TBP installment but not because I want to know what happens to the characters, merely because I want to know what is going on. Still the narrative seems a welcome installment in the new movement of comics, christened LAF by introduction writer Bill Willingham, which are not only making comics adult but intelligent adult with their intertextuality and generous references to historical events.
clfisha on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Imagine the worlds best selling fantasy series was never finished, the author disappearing into thin air. Now imagine that was your father and those books star you as the hero and your life is now one round of signings and interviews at fantasy conventions. Bad enough until you realise your childhood was a lie and someone is out to kill you.A startlingly good first graphic novel, just enough to set the scene and draw you but leaving you enough mystery to wonder where it's all going. The playful merging of reality and literature is not only great fun it makes a great plot, a plot which moves along at a fast pace and is complex but never overwhelming. The artwork is superb too. I for one cannot wait to get my hands on the 2nd volume.
Brasspistol on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Read this today and I'm still processing...I read it in once sitting and I fell in love with it.... It's brilliant I mean I can't explain it now, but it's amazing.
elmyra on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This got reviewed on BoingBoing a couple of weeks ago and both comic shops in Newcastle had sold out by the time I got there (though neither shop seemed to make the connection ;-). I finally got my hands on it. I do miss having a local independent comic shop where the staff know me and can recommend things - there's no way I should have found out about this from Cory Doctorow, much as I like him. ;-)Anyway, this is a great first volume with lots of food for thought on the power of stories. Mikey Carey rolls out all the clichés and trops of fantasy in his "story within a story" of Tommy Taylor. That bit reminds me a little of the Sandman issue about the serial killer convention. The narrative technique, of stories within stories, is tried and tested (Wuthering Heights, Sandman - Worlds' End), and Mike Carey pulls it off well. It's also well supported by Peter Gross's artwork which, though not stunning, gets the story across nicely. I like some of the cover art and the sketches very much too. Possibly the one real quibble I have with the volume is Bill Willingham's introduction, which is pretentious beyond belief. I'm looking forward to picking up the next volume when it comes out.Bechdel: Pass (the horror writers' workshop)
tapestry100 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Imagine that you are Harry Potter. Not the character in the wildly popular book series, but actually a young man named Harry Potter who is the basis for the wildly popular, thirteen book series that your father wrote with the main character based on you. What do you think your life would be like?That's basically how The Unwritten opens. Tom Taylor's dad has written an enormously popular series of books, very similar to the Harry Potter books, and based the main character of the series on his son, even naming the series of the books after his son. Tom Taylor has grown up being "Tommy Taylor," the hero of his father's book series, and is becoming quite tired of that persona. He's tried several times to break out on his own, but nothing can change the public's perception that he is Tommy Taylor, boy wizard.Eventually, it comes to light that possibly Tom Taylor may not be the person that even he thinks he is, and he goes on his own quest to discover his past and who he really is, only to discover there are secrets about his life that may or may not parallel the events of the books that his father wrote and that there is a group that seems to be bent of destroying him and who also seem to have been involved with other authors over the years, influencing their work to their own, mysterious ends.Frankly, I had a hard time finishing this story. It was read for a graphic novel discussion group that I belong to, and found that I had lost interest about halfway through. I think the author is trying to drop too many mysteries all at one time into the story to make it intriguing, but I found it just made too many story threads to try to keep track of. One thing that I found particularly distracting was the final chapter of this collected edition, which tells who this mysterious group has been influencing authors for years. When I got to the last panel of the main story, and turned the page and discovered what seemed like an entirely disparate story going on, I actually thought there had been a mistake at the printer and that another entirely different graphic novel had been bound into the volume that I was reading. Once I figured out that this was telling a little back story, it made it a little more clear, but to finish out the novel in such a drastically different way really pulled me entirely out of a story that was already just barely keeping my interest. However, on the flip side of that, I'm interested to see how the map that is discovered that seems to link Tom Taylor to numerous physical landmarks that have some sort of tie to literary events (such as the house that all the main characters end up at the end of the book is the same house where Milton wrote Paradie Lost, Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein and finally, supposedly Tom Taylor's father wrote the Tommy Taylor books here, too). This is the one aspect of the story that will bring me to getting the second volume, because I'd like to see how Carey works in other literary works into this story and how they will help Tom Taylor get out of his predicament.
fyrefly98 on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Summary: Tom Taylor is the adult son of Wilson Taylor, author of the famous beloved Tommy Taylor series of books. Wilson disappeared mysteriously after writing the thirteenth book, and Tom is now making a living on the convention circuit, although he's getting tired of people assuming he's the boy from his father's books. One day, a woman shows up at a convention with some very disturbing questions about Tom's past, and suddenly, everything Tom thought he knew about who he is starts to unravel.This collection ends with a one-off issue from the point of view of Rudyard Kipling, which doesn't bear directly on the main plot but does shed a little light on the means and motives of the villains of the story.Review: In his introduction, Bill Willingham (of Fables fame), points out that while the last century of comics was dominated by the superheroes, the new trend in comics is the rise of the fantasy stories, animal stories, and literature-based comics. He dubs this the "LAF Triumverate," and while I agree that the three are inextricably linked, I think he doesn't really stress the main common theme that holds them together: LAF comics are, almost without exception, stories about stories. And that, of course, is why I love them, and why I thought "The Unwritten" was so great.Seriously, I feel like "The Unwritten" was written specifically for me, it's got so many elements that I love. It's a story about stories, and the power of stories to shape our lives and the world around us. It is chock-full of literary references that are actually relevant to the story. It gave me a chance to apply one of my favorite tags on LibraryThing, "permeable boundaries between fiction and reality" (otherwise only used for Cornelia's Inkworld books and Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next series.) It's got a good and mysterious mystery set up in this first volume, with plenty of clues doled out and a serious sense of urgency. It's got splashes of horror, but also has this wonderful, witty, dark sense of humor about the whole thing - I particularly love the zealots who claim Tommy is the Messiah: quite literally, the "word made flesh." I feel like it's also got a bit of the social commentary about the public's obsession with Harry Potter-esque fantasy worlds that Lev Grossman was shooting for with The Magicians, but it manages it more subtly and evenly. Overall, this had pretty much everything I could possibly want out of a comic, and I can only hope that Carey and Gross manage to keep this series at the high level with which they started out. 5 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: The two big and obvious read-alike recommendations are Sandman and Fables - if you like those, you'll almost certainly like The Unwritten as well. If you haven't read those - or haven't read many/any graphic novels in general - but if the idea of metafiction, or stories about stories, appeals to you, then you should check out The Unwritten for sure.
majkia on LibraryThing 7 months ago
This was my first graphic novel in a zillion years. I found some of the conventions used confusing, and found transitions even more so. The story was interesting but I doubt I'll finish reading it. I like more depth and exposition that isn't available in this format.
GingerbreadMan on LibraryThing 7 months ago
40% of all literate people have read at least one of the thirteen ginourmous best seller books about the kid wizard Tommy Taylor. Which is of course good news for Tom Taylor, son of the author and model for the protagonist, if perhaps not *quite* as good as one could expect. The writer is mysteriously disappeared since many years, leaving nothing for his son. Tom is now making a living doing signings at conventions and bookstores and is being perhaps a tad bitter. But living semi-successfully in dad¿s shadow is at least better than publicly getting hit over the head with the question if he¿s really his son at all. Or indeed, if he¿s even a real person and not just a character of fiction. Because ¿ you know the genre drill, people ¿ there is *another* reality in the middle of and next to ours, and Tom¿s legacy shows strong signs of being much stranger than just possibly being an illegitimate heir.Original in a (rather) low-key way, this is a pretty wonderful start of a new series. And since it¿s a first volume it¿s almost all about exposition and the tossing of storylines all over the place. Which it does beautifully, creating a world which is interesting to be in without really answering a single thing. It¿s really only in the concluding short story ¿ almost a standalone, starring (and managing to whip up some sympathy for) the silly old racist Kipling ¿ where we get some more meat on where this might be going. I have volume two on my shelves, and it won¿t be long before I pick it up. I really hope this series holds up, it has great potential.
SleepDreamWrite 10 months ago
Good volume.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great graphic novel love the premise
BookSakeBlogspot More than 1 year ago
The premise of this graphic novel is pretty interesting. However the interest ends there and just turns to confusing. We don’t really get any type of character development. The characters are just there to push the story along. For the first volume I didn’t feel like there was strong enough of a conclusion or cliffhanger. The art wasn’t amazing, but it got the job done. For a really great myth comes alive story check out the Fables books. Reviewed by Chris for Book Sake.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this series in spite of a few moments that I found a bit too gruesome and horrifying. It's worth getting through those for the literary allusions and insights that make my synapses sing.
Sean_From_OHIO More than 1 year ago
Mike Carey delves into a literary hodge podge of the past and combines it with a Harry Potter-esque hype to create an incredible mystery that seems to have more layers than even the readers know. The art is very simple but that's not a bad thing. Peter Gross makes all the normal human characters identifiable and that's not always easy. I can't wait to see what happens next to Tommy Taylor, er I mean Tom Taylor.
Icaruslanding More than 1 year ago
Although I absolutely loved the mythology and storyline of Lucifer, I have yet to be wowed by unwritten. The Harry Potter catch is pretty weak. He could have given similar impulse to his story line without ripping off a pretty un-original background for it's first breath of life. The mood and setting are good otherwise though, so I guess we'll just have to see. Because I've loved Carey's other works, I hold hope....and hope that Harry Potter will not be all he has to offer over the life of this yarn.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tapestry100 More than 1 year ago
Imagine that you are Harry Potter. Not the character in the wildly popular book series, but actually a young man named Harry Potter who is the basis for the wildly popular, thirteen book series that your father wrote with the main character based on you. What do you think your life would be like? That's basically how The Unwritten opens. Tom Taylor's dad has written an enormously popular series of books, very similar to the Harry Potter books, and based the main character of the series on his son, even naming the series of the books after his son. Tom Taylor has grown up being "Tommy Taylor," the hero of his father's book series, and is becoming quite tired of that persona. He's tried several times to break out on his own, but nothing can change the public's perception that he is Tommy Taylor, boy wizard. Eventually, it comes to light that possibly Tom Taylor may not be the person that even he thinks he is, and he goes on his own quest to discover his past and who he really is, only to discover there are secrets about his life that may or may not parallel the events of the books that his father wrote and that there is a group that seems to be bent of destroying him and who also seem to have been involved with other authors over the years, influencing their work to their own, mysterious ends. Frankly, I had a hard time finishing this story. It was read for a graphic novel discussion group that I belong to, and found that I had lost interest about halfway through. I think the author is trying to drop too many mysteries all at one time into the story to make it intriguing, but I found it just made too many story threads to try to keep track of. One thing that I found particularly distracting was the final chapter of this collected edition, which tells who this mysterious group has been influencing authors for years. When I got to the last panel of the main story, and turned the page and discovered what seemed like an entirely disparate story going on, I actually thought there had been a mistake at the printer and that another entirely different graphic novel had been bound into the volume that I was reading. Once I figured out that this was telling a little back story, it made it a little more clear, but to finish out the novel in such a drastically different way really pulled me entirely out of a story that was already just barely keeping my interest. However, on the flip side of that, I'm interested to see how the map that is discovered that seems to link Tom Taylor to numerous physical landmarks that have some sort of tie to literary events (such as the house that all the main characters end up at the end of the book is the same house where Milton wrote Paradise Lost, Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein and finally, supposedly Tom Taylor's father wrote the Tommy Taylor books here, too). This is the one aspect of the story that will bring me to getting the second volume, because I'd like to see how Carey works in other literary works into this story and how they will help Tom Taylor get out of his predicament.