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The Utes Must Go!: American Expansion and the Removal of a People
     

The Utes Must Go!: American Expansion and the Removal of a People

5.0 1
by Peter Decker
 

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Tracing three centuries of Ute Indian history, "The Utes Must Go!" chronicles the policies and incidents that led to the involuntary removal of the Ute Indians from Colorado, New Mexico, and Wyoming. Historian Peter Decker unveils new critical information on figures such as U.S. Army Maj. Thomas Thornburgh, Interior Secretary Carl Schurz, famed newspaperman

Overview

Tracing three centuries of Ute Indian history, "The Utes Must Go!" chronicles the policies and incidents that led to the involuntary removal of the Ute Indians from Colorado, New Mexico, and Wyoming. Historian Peter Decker unveils new critical information on figures such as U.S. Army Maj. Thomas Thornburgh, Interior Secretary Carl Schurz, famed newspaperman Horace Greeley, and Indian Agent Nathan Meeker whose relentless mission to turn Indian hunters into farmers led to the tragedy at Milk Creek in 1879. Decker's research brings to light the complete drama of a proud Indian people swept away by the nineteenth-century tide of pioneer settlement, racism, and greed.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781555918484
Publisher:
Fulcrum Publishing
Publication date:
04/06/2004
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
File size:
3 MB

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The Utes Must Go!: American Expansion and the Removal of a People 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Peter R. Decker has written a magisterial, riveting work about the removal of the Ute Indians from Colorado. He paints the American West of the mid-to late-19th century with such colorful, vivid strokes that one can't help but be transported to the 'scene of the crime.' This is truly an impressive and important accomplishment of documentation and narrative. Decker's biographical sketches of the key players in the drama -- from Ute leaders Ouray and Captain Jack to hapless Indian agent Nathan Meeker, to Interior Secretary Carl Schurtz, are masterly in themselves. For sheer energy and artistry, nothing I've read on the subject approaches it.