The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches

The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches

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The Voyage of the Beagle: Charles Darwin's Journal of Researches 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Alyssa_M More than 1 year ago
The Voyage of the Beagle, apart from being a poetic and engaging read, provides insight into Darwin the young naturalist. Filled with curiosity and discovery, Darwin's journalistic account of his time aboard the Beagle is of particular to interest to those with backgrounds in biology, anthropology, and geology. From Brazil to Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego to the Galapagos Islands, and Australia to Mauritius, Darwin gathered specimens, rode with the gauchos, and confronted the issue of slavery while on his 5-year voyage. In the grand scheme, The Voyage of the Beagle laid the conceptual and evidentiary groundwork for Darwin's theory of evolution by means of natural selection. In that sense, The Voyage of the Beagle gives the reader a snapshot of the most transformative experience of Darwin's life and the evolution of Darwin himself. At times, Darwin's tone is a bit lecturing and Orientalist, though these habits are explicable given his scientific aspirations and British patronage. At other times, Darwin's tone is adventuresome and evocative, as when he describes Tahitian tattoos and a Chilean miner at work. Beyond containing the glimmers of evolution, as in Darwin observations of the similarities of the South American Tinochorus birds, Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle conveys a sense of wonder and enchantment toward nature that is enhanced by scientific inquiry. As such, The Voyage of the Beagle does not consist merely of a man rushing headlong into the world, seeking whatever thrills he may find. Rather, Darwin's quest was always informed by a purpose, a teleology, to understand how things are and expand the frontiers of science through naturalistic observation. Thus, Darwin gives the reader the following reflective advice: "before undertaking a long voyage, [one should possess] a decided taste for some branch of knowledge, which could by this means be advanced."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago