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Waltz Project Revisited: New Waltzes for Piano
     

The Waltz Project Revisited: New Waltzes for Piano

by Eric Moe
 
The Waltz Project Revisited, by Eric Moe, shows just how diverse contemporary music is. The term waltz proves to be as flexible and durable as a springboard in these miniatures. The composers represented here used the traditional waltz in 3/4 time as a starting point for these varied and distinctive works, running the gamut from sentimental to quirky, from

Overview

The Waltz Project Revisited, by Eric Moe, shows just how diverse contemporary music is. The term waltz proves to be as flexible and durable as a springboard in these miniatures. The composers represented here used the traditional waltz in 3/4 time as a starting point for these varied and distinctive works, running the gamut from sentimental to quirky, from dissonantly atonal to polytonal, and from those with an easy-to-follow beat to those without. Through all of these, Moe unmistakably brings out the intrinsic characteristics that define each waltz. Louis Karchin's "Ghost Waltz" is spooky in an ethereal way. "Shadow Waltz," by Mathew Rosenblum, is defined by the way the microtonal keyboard follows, in its own intriguing fashion, what is played on the traditional piano. Even Wayne Peterson's "Valse Subliminale" and Charles Wuorinen's "Self-Similar Waltz," the two least obvious waltzes, are treated not only with respect for their construction, but with genuine feeling and humor. A healthy respect for the past is found in Joan Tower's "Red Garnet Waltz," which uses Debussy's colorful chords, and in Akin Euba's "Study in African Jazz 3," which quotes "I Got Rhythm." Moe's own "Pulaski Skyway Waltz" and Anthony Cornicello's "PostModern Waltz," both immediately appealing for their sophisticated, rhythmic energy, quote from jazz pianists Mal Waldron and McCoy Tyner, respectively. Ricky Ian Gordon's polytonal "Waltz" is as tenderly handled as Zygmunt Krauze's "Music Box Waltz" is delicately. Lou Harrison's and Philip Glass' waltzes are quintessential illustrations of their styles: Harrison uses Asian pentatonic scales in a tranquil, uncomplicated manner; Glass alternates an almost frenetic theme with a slower, out-of-sync one, all accompanied by a staccato ostinato. The sheer variety and Moe's facility with all of them ensure that listeners will find more than one waltz to their liking. It just goes to show that you can teach an old dance new tricks.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/30/2004
Label:
Albany Records
UPC:
0034061068921
catalogNumber:
689

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Susan's Waltz (Valse sentimentale), for piano
  2. Valse Subliminale, for piano
  3. Valse Mirage for piano
  4. Waltz for piano, for piano
  5. Pulaski Skyway Waltz, for piano
  6. Ghost Waltz, for piano
  7. Self-Similar Waltz, for piano
  8. Red Garnet Waltz, for piano
  9. Study in African Jazz 3, for piano
  10. Character Sketch: About a Waltz, for piano
  11. Waltz for piano
  12. Music Box Waltz for piano
  13. Dances (5) for Piano: Waltz
  14. Waltz for piano
  15. Modern Love Waltz, for piano (or chamber ensemble)
  16. One Moe Time (Waltz for Eric), for piano
  17. Minute Waltz, for 4 pianos
  18. levitation of pianos during a waltz, for piano
  19. Waltz for Evelyn Hinrichsen, for piano or harp or guitar
  20. Shadow Waltz, for piano
  21. For a Happy Occasion, for piano ("Happy Birthday Mrs. Zimbalist")
  22. PostModern Waltz, for piano

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Eric Moe   Primary Artist

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