The Way You Make Me Feel

The Way You Make Me Feel

by Maurene Goo

NOOK Book(eBook)

$9.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780374304096
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date: 05/08/2018
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 162,741
File size: 4 MB
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Maurene Goo is the author of several books for young adults, including I Believe in a Thing Called Love, which received starred reviews from Kirkus and Publishers Weekly. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and her cat, Maeby.
Maurene Goo grew up in a Los Angeles suburb surrounded by floral wallpaper, one thousand cousins, and piles of books. She studied communication at UC San Diego and then later received a Masters in publishing, writing, and literature at Emerson College. Before publishing her first book, Since You Asked, she worked in both textbook and art book publishing. She has very strong feelings about tacos and houseplants. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two cats.

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

This paper plane was near perfect.

Crisp edges, a pointy nose, and just the right weight. I held it up, closing my left eye to aim it toward the stage. Rose Carver and her short-brimmed black hat were in fine form today, a perfect target, her face lit up beatifically by the stage lights. As she went on about junior prom announcements, I grew more focused.

"Clara, aim it at her face."

My eyes swept over to Patrick Keen sitting next to me. He was slouched so far down in his seat that his chin was touching his chest, his long, pale limbs folded into an impossible position.

"That's not how I roll, jerk," I said.

"Yeah, we're here for the giggles, not tears," Felix Benavides whispered from my other side. He looked at me for approval when he said it, eyebrow arched.

Sometimes these two really knew how to kill a joke. Glancing around the auditorium to make sure no teachers were watching, I lifted the plane into my line of vision ...

"Clara Shin!"

I startled, the paper plane dropping by my feet with a clatter. The voice had come over the speakers. Why was Rose saying my name up there?

I cupped my hands around my mouth and bellowed, "WHAT?" It reverberated off the wood-paneled walls and high ceilings.

Rose rolled her eyes and exhaled into the microphone, making it squawk. "I just said you're nominated for junior prom queen." She held up a piece of paper and stared at it, in disbelief at the words she was seeing.

Patrick and Felix burst out laughing and then reached over me to high-five each other. Oh my GOD. "I'm going to kill you guys," I hissed. As people swiveled their heads to look over at me, I started to form an idea.

Rose cleared her throat into the microphone. "Anyway, the other nominees are —"

I stood up, making the folded upholstered seat bounce loudly as it closed. "Thanks, Rose!" I hollered. She frowned, then squinted into the audience to see what I was doing. I remained standing, then held up my arms dramatically. "And thank you, student body, for this honor." I projected my voice as I looked around. I saw a few teachers get up. Need to make this quick.

"Thank you for letting me into your hearts. And now, my promise to you: if I get voted prom queen, there will be some much-needed changes made to Elysian High ..."

Rose's voice interrupted me from the speakers. "You don't get to do anything if you win prom queen. It's not like being class president!" she scoffed into the microphone. She would know; she was junior class president.

"Regardless!" My voice boomed. "I will promise you all one thing ... as Queen Clara." I racked my brain for what, the improvisation making me buzz. Then, an idea struck. I motioned for Patrick to hand me my backpack. He tossed it to me, and I reached into the front zippered pocket. "I promise that us girls will not be prisoners to our bodies! We will have equal rights!" Some girls cheered in the audience.

Rose spoke again. "We do have equal —"

"So, in the spirit of feminism and equality — THERE WILL BE FREE TAMPONS FOR ALL!" I yelled, releasing fistfuls of my tampons into the crowd. Good thing I had just bought a new box that morning. Yellow-patterned, regular-flow — they flew into the air and landed on the heads and laps of the people in the rows around me. The laughter came in waves, and girls sprang out of their seats to pick up tampons off the floor, some chasing them as they rolled down the aisles. Boys threw them at one another. More teachers stood up to calm everyone down. Rose Carver stomped offstage in a huff.

The disruption and mayhem fed my soul, and I looked around the auditorium triumphantly.

"Aren't you glad we nominated you?" Felix asked, popping a toothpick into his mouth and grinning. Felix thought chewing on toothpicks made him look like James Dean or something.

I shrugged. "It made things interesting."

"Clara."

I looked down the row of seats toward the voice of my young, white homeroom teacher, Mr. Sinclair. I threw him a wide smile. "Hey, Mr. S."

"Hey, yourself. I'm reporting you to the principal, let's go." Because these assemblies were always held during homeroom, Mr. Sinclair was left in charge of me. Lucky him.

Patrick let out a low whistle. "I'll go with you, Mr. S." He winked at him.

Young, handsome Mr. Sinclair, with the chiseled jaw and thick blond hair, rolled his eyes. "Not this time. Clara. Now." He adjusted his tortoiseshell glasses, a nerdy little signature gesture that made everyone in his classes swoon.

I grabbed my backpack and took my sweet time walking by everyone in my row to get to him. The audience was already starting to disperse when I followed Mr. Sinclair down the aisle toward the double doors.

"Nice stunt," Mr. Sinclair said as we wove through the streams of students headed out of the auditorium.

"I live to please."

He shook his head. "Aren't you sick of detention by now?"

"Nope, can't get enough."

"Why can't you channel that smart-mouth into your schoolwork?"

The May Los Angeles sunshine blinded me the second we stepped outside, and I pulled on my mirrored aviators. "Are you saying I'm smart?"

Before he could answer, someone called out my name from behind us. I turned around and made a face. It was Rose Carver.

Tall, graceful, and precise in her movements, Rose walked briskly over to me. Her skinny jeans fit her dancer's legs like a glove, her floral-print blouse was tucked in, and the pixie cut under her hat showed off her delicate features. Rose looked like a long-lost Obama daughter.

When she reached me, I was annoyed that I had to look up at her. "What?" I asked.

Her expression was focused and determined. I could feel the bossiness rolling off her in waves.

I hated Rose Carver.

She jabbed a finger into my shoulder. "You need to shut this down."

"Shut what down?"

"This whole prom-queen thing. You had your fun.

Tampons, hardy har har," she said, throwing her head back. Then she focused her laserlike eyes on me again. "Now, drop out of the running and let someone who actually cares have a chance to win."

Her condescension was like manna from the gods. I squinted up at her. "You mean, someone like you?"

She rolled her eyes. "Yeah, or anyone else, really."

"You're so selfless, always thinking about the greater good," I said with a smile.

Her eyes closed briefly, as if she was harnessing all that impeccable self-control exercised by high-achieving ballerinas everywhere. "I didn't spend months as the head of the prom committee only to have you make a joke out of the whole thing." The thought of spending months caring about prom was suffocating.

I stood on my tippy-toes to try to be at eye level with her. "I'm not going to apologize for you wasting your social life on prom." Her eyes flashed and I continued, "You know, I was considering dropping out. But you just made me change my mind."

"Clara, Rose. That's enough," Mr. Sinclair said. "Let's go."

I patted Rose's arm before walking away. "See you at prom, Rose."

From behind me, I heard her shout, "You're such a child!"

I continued down the familiar path toward the principal's office.

CHAPTER 2

There weren't enough hot dogs and Flamin' Hot Cheetos in the world to satiate Patrick and Felix. After my inevitable detention that afternoon, I met up with them at one of the thousands of 7-Elevens in Los Angeles, this one on Echo Park's main drag — Sunset Boulevard, a few blocks away from Elysian High.

Despite what it means to popular culture, Sunset Boulevard isn't a glamorous street littered with movie stars driving around in convertibles or something. For one thing, Sunset runs here all the way from the beach. It's like twenty-two miles long. It starts at the Pacific Coast Highway, passes by mansions near UCLA, gross clubs and comedy bars in West Hollywood, tourist traps in Hollywood, strip malls with Thai food and laundromats in East Hollywood, juice shops and overpriced boho boutiques in Silver Lake, and then lands here in Echo Park, another quickly gentrifying eastside neighborhood full of coffee shops and taquerias.

When I got to the 7-Eleven, the AC hit me with an icy blast as I stepped inside, the electronic bell chiming. Patrick and Felix were picking out change from their wallets to pay for their hot dogs, and Felix's girlfriend, Cynthia Vartanyan, was there, too. She sat in front of the magazine rack, her skinny, crossed legs encased in sheer black tights, her long, thick black hair tucked into a knit beanie, her fingers flipping through the latest issue of Rolling Stone. Of course. She was one of those insufferable snobs who pieced together a personality with obscure music facts.

We didn't get along. One, because Felix was my ex-boyfriend from freshman year, and she couldn't hang with that no matter how many years it had been. Two, my favorite thing to do around her was ask if she'd ever heard of X band — a band that was always on the radio. The self-control needed on her end not to go off on some pretentious rant about mainstream music was amazing.

"Hey, kids." I dropped my backpack down next to Cynthia, and she looked up at me with a small, tight smile.

"Please keep your belongings on your person!" barked Warren, the gawky and perpetually greasy-haired clerk.

I opened a bag of Cool Ranch Doritos and popped one in my mouth. "Only if you ask nicely, babe." He flushed but let it go. Warren secretly loved having us hang out here. Once, we ran off a potential robber by throwing candy bars at him and screaming until the guy dropped his switchblade and bolted. There was an unspoken rule from that day on that we were allowed to loiter for as long as we wanted. And that's literally all we did. Hang out at 7-Eleven. My adolescence would end up being represented by a variety of Frito-Lay products.

"What's up, future prom queen?" Patrick asked before taking a huge bite out of his hot dog. Patrick probably ate more calories in a day than Michael Phelps, but he still looked like a Goth scarecrow.

I tossed a chip at his head. "Thanks for that."

Felix grinned, his teeth straight, white, and slightly vampiric. "It was a last-minute stroke of genius." Like me, Felix lived for pranks and disruption. Compact and graceful, he was basically a male, Mexican American me, but with much better personal grooming habits. And that's what ultimately killed our relationship — turns out when both people in a couple are stubborn and easily bored, things get tiresome, fast.

And if there was one thing that bonded the three of us, it was the ease of our friendship. There was never any drama or conflict. We existed in a carefully balanced ecosystem of chill — while making sure we kept things interesting, always.

And normally something like running for prom queen would be considered too much work. I looked at Patrick and Felix, who had gotten me into this mess. "You know, this backfired on you guys. I was going to drop out, but then freaking Rose Carver confronted me after the assembly," I said, swinging myself up on the counter by the coffee machine.

"Clara!"

I blew Warren a kiss. "Just keepin' it warm." He harrumphed but continued to organize cigarettes.

Patrick frowned. "What did Overlord Carver have to say?"

"I should drop out since I don't really care about winning."

Felix plopped down next to Cynthia and tossed an arm across her shoulders. "Who does?"

Cynthia snorted as she snuggled into Felix. "Dorks."

Felix and Patrick laughed, and I let out a brief guffaw. Something about Cynthia's jokes never flew with me, but I knew if I didn't laugh I'd hear it from Felix later. He was always asking me to be nicer to her, as if we should naturally be friends by our gender alone. Or by the fact that we've both had his tongue down our throats.

"So, are we gonna do this? Really?" Felix asked.

I nodded. "Yup, good job, bozos. We're in this now."

"All right. I guess we've gotta up our campaign game," Patrick said, tossing the foil hot dog wrapper into the trash. "Signs, slogan, the whole eight yards."

My eyelid twitched. "Nine yards."

He shrugged. Precision was not Patrick's strong suit. He was funny, though — quick to abuse his slim body to make us laugh, and a pitch-perfect impersonator who once made me pee my pants during a school play by imitating the lead's nasal voice, which had vibrated with phlegm on every vowel. I was never bored with Patrick.

I leaned back against the wall. "Can I just be the pretty face of the campaign?"

"Consider us your campaign managers," Felix said, feeding Cynthia some Sour Patch Kids. Ugh. While Patrick and Felix brainstormed ways to win me the junior prom crown, I flipped through a celebrity tabloid magazine, making Warren rate all the outfits.

* * *

The smell of frying fish hit me the second I stepped into my apartment. Although I had eaten an entire bag of Doritos (topped off with Red Vines) mere minutes ago, my stomach grumbled with hunger.

Nineties hip-hop was blasting, and my dad was in the kitchen, fanning the smoke detector with a dish towel. Our cat, Flo, hid under the sofa, her striped tail poofed like a raccoon's and sticking out in plain view.

"Pai, it smells like all the grease in the world came here to die," I said, flinging some windows open to air the apartment out.

"You're such a poet, Shorty," he said as he tucked the towel into his back pocket and checked the pans on the stove before facing me to ruffle my hair — long, unruly, and growing out of its lavender dye job on the bottom.

"What's for dinner?" I asked. I peered over his shoulder.

"Fried catfish. I found a cool recipe that uses a batter inspired by KFC's secret recipe," he said, adjusting the splatter guard on one of the pans.

I swiped a bottle of some fancy root beer on the counter and took a sip. "Uh, like Kentucky Fried Chicken KFC?"

"No, the other one, Kentucky Fried Corn."

Root beer bubbled into my nose as I laughed. My dad hit my back, hard, when I started to choke.

My dad, Adrian, was always experimenting with recipes. As the owner and chef of a food truck, that was pretty much his job. Since before I was born, he'd always worked at various restaurants, starting off as a busboy when he first immigrated here from Brazil ("Adrian" was the Americanized "Adriano"). My clearest childhood memories were the nights when, after his late shift, my dad would pick me up from my babysitter's and carry me home on his shoulders as I dozed off. Finally, two years ago, he had saved up enough money to open his own food truck, the KoBra — a literal and metaphorical merging of Korea and Brazil. My grandparents had made the trek from Seoul to São Paulo, a city with an established Korean immigrant population, where my dad was born. Months before I was born, my parents packed up for LA.

The food was symbolic of my dad's upbringing. People were always confused by my dad's Korean face and Portuguese-accented English. It helped with the ladies, though, which was gross.

While it hadn't been a wild overnight success, the KoBra had a pretty loyal following. My dad's dream, though, was to open a restaurant. He was hoping the KoBra could springboard that.

I pulled myself up onto the counter and swung my legs back and forth as I watched him cook. "Guess what?"

"What?" He drizzled some olive oil on a neat row of green beans laid in a cast-iron pan.

"I got nominated for junior prom queen."

He looked at me quizzically, a half smile on his face. "Are you serious?"

"Yeah, Patrick and Felix nominated me, and somehow I'm on the prom court. Which means people get to vote on whether or not I become prom queen."

My dad cackled as he opened the oven and slid the pan of beans onto a rack. "You? Prom queen? I would pay good money to see that."

"I know, right? Anyway, I wasn't going to take it seriously until this uptight B literally ordered me to drop out. So I'm going to stay in the game."

He closed the oven and grinned at me as he straightened up and wiped his hands on the dish towel. "Ah, my Clara, always shaking things up." My dad pronounced my name differently from everyone else, Clahhra instead of Clerra.

"You know it," I said.

"When's prom?"

I shrugged. "I dunno. Probably soon since school's almost over."

"Time flies, Shorty. I can't believe you'll be graduating high school next year. Makes me feel old."

I snorted. "You're like two decades younger than everyone else's dads." My dad was only thirty-four; he had me when he was eighteen, just a couple of years older than I was right now. Patrick called us the Gilmore Girls.

(Continues…)


Excerpted from "The Way You Make Me Feel"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Maurene Goo.
Excerpted by permission of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Way You Make Me Feel 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Take_Me_AwayPH 7 months ago
I was a bit iffy about this one because the last one I read by her I was really on the fence with it. Nevertheless, I sat down and read this in two days. I don't know the last time I did that. Although it had its issues, it was still an enjoyable summer read. Clara is the class clown and she feeds off the laughs she provides to her friends and even those that don't like her. But one day she went too far and her dad sentences her to working for him on his food truck. Even worse, with the person who got her into this mess, Rose Carver. But unexpectedly, working there over the summer gets easier and more fun as the summer goes by. The only reason I didn't give this 5 stars was the MC. I understand she was a prankster, but LAWD someone should have told her for stunts like she did someone could get hurt or ARRESTED. A lot of the things she did didn't even seem funny to me. I was definitely more of a Rose fan. I liked that she was able to calm her down. And then there was Hamlet. I liked him for her too. He wasn't afraid to tell her like it was, no matter what the situation was. She was so annoying and they really helped to tone her down. I didn't really start liking her until close to the end I realized. And last but not least, her dad was THE BEST.He was present in her life and he was super funny and acted like a parent. Not always present in YA nowadays. (It's normally a present mother) I really loved summery, food truck setting of the book as well. It was something that I had never read before and it was fun to see the way they worked together and how things were different from a real restaurant. (I worked at Olive Garden before) It was also really great to finallybe able to read some books set in the sunshine when the sun is actually shining outside. I also really loved the plot. It was set at a great pace. I found that it flowed so easily, that I wasn't even aware that that much time had passed. (The whole summer.) I found that I was so invested in the story that I didn't care, I just wanted it to keep going. I had a small issue with the main character in the beginning, but for the most part I really liked this one. This one is very different from her last, I Believe in a Thing Called Love. I can'y wait to see what else Goo will write.
thereadingchick 7 months ago
Clara Shin is skimming through life having fun and playing practical jokes until one day at school one of those jokes goes a little too far. In order to get out of being suspended she is forced to work with her arch enemy Rose on her father’s food truck, the KoBra, for the summer, skipping her trip to Tulum with her mom. What starts off as torture turns into a summer of making new friends, discovering a lot about herself, and falling in love. She learns there is more to life than living on the surface. Life’s rewards come from caring deeply about the people around you even if you may run the risk of getting hurt. At first Clara’s life with her single father dad, Adrian, didn’t seem to have any consequence. He was the cool parent, finding himself a father to a teenager while only 34 years old. Clara wasn’t the only person to grow in this book. Her father also saw that he wasn’t doing his daughter any favors by laughing at her antics. A little discipline, while hard for both of them, ended up proving to be the best thing for both of them, forcing them to deal with feelings that neither of them were comfortable sharing. Clara’s friendship with Rose grows slowly and is really very sweet. Clara’s prior friends were two boys who egged her on in her unruly behavior. Rose was a very structured person and they ended up being the Yin to the others Yang. Perfect complements to each other. Hamlet, the boy Clara meets while working the food truck is totally different then the other boys she’s used to being around. While movie star handsome, he has an old school charm that makes his personality different than any one else. He is polite and her dad likes him for goodness sake! He pursues Clara and her shy uncertainty with this alien creature was very sweet. I enjoyed their growing relationship and was pleased that this author stayed true to the sweetness of their feelings by not advancing them into adulthood too quickly. This was my first novel by Maurene Goo and I really liked it. It was so easy to read and I liked the growth all of the characters showed from beginning to end. She delivered her message in a way that didn’t preach, instead showed how Clara’s life improved by allowing herself to feel things. That’s a message that a person at any age can appreciate and understand. This was an Uppercase Box subscription book and was totally worth the money spent. ❤️❤️❤️❤️
thereadingchick 7 months ago
Clara Shin is skimming through life having fun and playing practical jokes until one day at school one of those jokes goes a little too far. In order to get out of being suspended she is forced to work with her arch enemy Rose on her father’s food truck, the KoBra, for the summer, skipping her trip to Tulum with her mom. What starts off as torture turns into a summer of making new friends, discovering a lot about herself, and falling in love. She learns there is more to life than living on the surface. Life’s rewards come from caring deeply about the people around you even if you may run the risk of getting hurt. At first Clara’s life with her single father dad, Adrian, didn’t seem to have any consequence. He was the cool parent, finding himself a father to a teenager while only 34 years old. Clara wasn’t the only person to grow in this book. Her father also saw that he wasn’t doing his daughter any favors by laughing at her antics. A little discipline, while hard for both of them, ended up proving to be the best thing for both of them, forcing them to deal with feelings that neither of them were comfortable sharing. Clara’s friendship with Rose grows slowly and is really very sweet. Clara’s prior friends were two boys who egged her on in her unruly behavior. Rose was a very structured person and they ended up being the Yin to the others Yang. Perfect complements to each other. Hamlet, the boy Clara meets while working the food truck is totally different then the other boys she’s used to being around. While movie star handsome, he has an old school charm that makes his personality different than any one else. He is polite and her dad likes him for goodness sake! He pursues Clara and her shy uncertainty with this alien creature was very sweet. I enjoyed their growing relationship and was pleased that this author stayed true to the sweetness of their feelings by not advancing them into adulthood too quickly. This was my first novel by Maurene Goo and I really liked it. It was so easy to read and I liked the growth all of the characters showed from beginning to end. She delivered her message in a way that didn’t preach, instead showed how Clara’s life improved by allowing herself to feel things. That’s a message that a person at any age can appreciate and understand. This was an Uppercase Box subscription book and was totally worth the money spent. ❤️❤️❤️❤️
crimson613 8 months ago
Where to begin…! I have to admit, starting this book was a little hard. We follow the life of Clara, high school prankster who one day takes a prank too far and ends up nearly burning down her school on junior prom. Or rather, she would say this is an exaggeration. But there was a fire and there was a lot of fake blood. Honesty, reading this book at my age is like seeing the incoming freshman trying to be cool. Even though Clara was technically a junior, I had a hard time not rolling my eyes at a lot of her antics and thinking she was childish. Still, as the story progresses, she does start to come into her own skin (though my Goodness, there were times when I had to really pause and really digest what she was doing) While the story wasn’t very moving for me, I do have to recognize it had some really nice points. One of them is that our cast is mainly made up of diverse characters, plus the one young white teacher, that were quirky in their own ways. I will have to say my favorite was Rose, the “antagonist” at the beginning. It seems like perfect ballerina Rose was always getting Clara into trouble and after what happened at junior prom, the two are forced to work together at Clara’s father’s food truck, the KoBra. I seriously thought that this was going to be a disaster! But as the two started to work more and more together, things started to work out. Their once truly venomous words started to turn more into friendly teasing. I really liked this budding friendship and have to admit that the reason I preferred Rose was mostly that she was more mature than Clara. Also, I feel like I should mention it only because I recently learned that Asians and Blacks don’t have a good history (twitter and movies, anyone seen that tweet?). If that IS the case, I think having this friendship between Clara and Rose is even more important on a cultural level. Another character that we end up meeting is Hamlet, Clara’s future boyfriend. While I didn’t love him, I also didn’t dislike him. To me he was sort of just there to be a boyfriend. But the one thing that I liked about him was his family. I swear, the first time we enter his home, it just really reminded me of my family in Mexico. There just seemed to be so many people around (not that many but it just Felt like it) and everyone was informal friendly. Like they were just going to swallow you into their family. And if there’s anything I really enjoy in a story it’s family, which reminds me. Aside from Rose, I also kind of really liked Clara’s father. I can’t remember the last book I read that included a single parent that was really present in the book and that was male, which is why I really liked this element. It also made me really respect him because he’s technically doing both jobs here (which is why I felt rather upset later on in the book about something). It’s mentioned that he starts from the bottom, gets himself a food truck, and then plans to open up a restaurant. It really reminded me about my own family! Overall, I didn’t love this book but I also didn’t dislike it. I think it really had many good elements and the only reason I didn’t enjoy it as much as I could have is because of the age difference (and mentality I think) between Clara and me.
Candice Zablan More than 1 year ago
I wasn’t too sure about this book from the first few chapters. Clara was a hard protagonist to understand at first because she just acted so childish, but slowly throughout the book we begin to see who she really is and why she acts the way she does. I ended up totally falling for her and all of the other characters in this super sweet book. I loved all the food references, Clara’s awesome dad, and the friendships Clara forms throughout the book. If you’re like me and aren’t feeling the first chapters please keep reading because it’s totally worth it!
Aditi-ATWAMB More than 1 year ago
THIS BOOK MADE ME LAUGH. Which is rare. I IMMENSELY enjoy and get HIGHLY invested in a few books too many than is healthy, but I very rarely laugh because of a book. The Way You Make Me Feel, in a nutshell, was an adorable read, filled with GREAT FOOD, diversity and anxiety rep that also made for a wonderful, light summer read and the perfect way to close out my last summer as a student (hello, senior year and my twenties *bursts into tears*) There were a lot of things I really liked about this book, so let’s break it down: 1. KOREAN – BRAZILIAN FUSION FOOD: If you read the synopsis, (directs you upwards) you’ll know that our main character spends her summer working in her dad’s Korean-Brazilian fusion food truck and OH MY GOD THE DESCRIPTIONS OF FOOD AND THE DIVERSITY IN THE FOOD WERE ESSENTIALLY THE BEST THING IN THE FOOD. 2. ALL THE DIVERSITY: Our main character, Clara Shin is Korean and Brazilian. Her co-worker on the food truck is African American and it all just felt right. It was so well done, and I loved how Maureen Goo portrayed her characters, especially how their skin color and roots were a part of who they were, and they were also so much more. 3. THIS WAS KIND OF HILARIOUS?: I read a sampler before requesting this book, and this book made me laugh in the VERY first scene which contained feminism, prom queens and tampons and I kept laughing after. 4. IT JUST MADE ME FEEL GOOD: Reading this story made me feel happy. I don’t know if it was Hamlet, the ADORABLE love interest, the fact that it was a summery read and also a love letter to LA and delicious food OR Clara’s personal growth, but I loved it regardless. The One Thing I Thought Could Have Been Better: 1. The Lack of Connect/ The Extreme fast pace of everything: When I read The Way You Make Me Feel, I felt disconnected from the story and all the brilliant elements playing out on the paper. I quickly realised it was because I felt like the dialogue was… insubstantial and very fast and there was SO MUCH TELLING AND NOT SHOWING, that I simply didn’t enjoy it as much. Would I recommend this book? YES. The Way You Make Me Feel was a hilarious, feel-good, summer read with some great character growth, diversity, romance and family.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a fun summer read! I found myself drawn into Clara's world very easily and the ending was perfect.
Gigous More than 1 year ago
The Way You Make Me Feel is a contemporary teen romance and a coming of age story. Taking place in present day Los Angeles, California and 17 year old Clara Shin tells the story in first person. Clara likes keep things fun, pull pranks, and not care about anything. When her friends, Patrick and Felix, nominate her for junior prom queen as a joke, she sees the opportunity to pull off a huge prank during prom. When that prank leads to property destruction and to Clara getting in a huge fight with the girl she hates, the over-achiever and perfectionist, Rose. To avoid the girls being suspended and to pay the school back for the damages, Clara’s dad, Adrian, and Rose’s parents come up with a solution that Clara and Rose will work at Adrian’s Korean Brazilian fusion food truck, the Kobra. Clara is very angry about that as she was going visit her mom in Tulum, Mexico during the summer. Clara’s mom is a social media influencer traveling around the world and Clara rarely gets to see her. The first few days on the Kobra, Clara and Rose argue and cannot work together, but eventually they get along. Clara realizes that Rose is much different than Clara always thought and that she actually likes hanging out with Rose. At one of the Kobra’s stops, Clara meets Hamlet, a cute boy about her age who works at the nearby coffee shop. Even though Hamlet is energetic, motivated, and nothing like Clara, Hamlet asks Clara out and Clara says yes. Hamlet quickly becomes her boyfriend and a big part of her life. Clara has been having more fun this summer with Hamlet and Rose than Patrick and Felix. Patrick and Felix tell Clara she is becoming a different person, one who actually cares about things. Clara is not sure she wants to change as she has always kept things at arms length to avoid being disappointed. Can Clara figure out who she wants to be? The story has a fair pace, good characters, and well-written settings. The story is hard to get into because Clara is really self absorbed and dislike any other girl, but Clara becomes more likable as the story goes on. The story also gets slow in some parts when Clara is being indecisive about who she wants to hang out with. The story does have diverse main characters as Clara is of Korean and Brazilian descent, Hamlet is Chinese, and Rose is black. Clara was sassy and funny, but could be very self-centered and annoying. Rose was goal driven and confident. Hamlet was a nice guy and fun. Adrian was a good father, but he could be a jerk, embarrassing Clara in public, and being passive-aggressive when talking about Clara’s mother. Patrick and Felix came off stereotypical, the gay guy and the trouble maker. The setting of Los Angeles is well described, you get a tour of Los Angeles. The story has no racy scenes, all Clara and Hamlet do is kiss. No love triangles, but the romance between Hamlet and Clara does move rather quickly. The story does not end on a cliffhanger and wraps up most the plot. I liked the book and would check out others by the author. An enjoyable summer read for fans of The Education of Margot Sanchez, Wesley James Ruined My Life, and 52 Reasons to Hate My Father. I received an advance digital copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
taramichelle More than 1 year ago
I loved I Believe In A Thing Called Love so I’ve been looking forward to The Way You Make Me Feel for a while. Luckily, it was just as adorable as I expected. Plus there were aspects of it that were unexpectedly deep and left me thinking long after I’d finished the book. I loved the food truck angle. However, don’t start reading this book while hungry. The food descriptions are amazing and will make your mouth water. (They’ll also make you want to find the nearest food truck!) I thought the examination of social media culture and perception was excellent. It definitely made me think about how I present myself on social media and how it’s affected and changed my life. At first, I wasn’t a huge fan of Clara. She was a bit bratty and too fond of her role as the class clown. However, she grows up a lot throughout the course of the novel. By the end, I actually really liked her as a character. The love interest made me smile, that part of the storyline was just so stinking cute. I also loved that, while present, the romance wasn’t a major part of the story. My favorite part of the story was the friendship that developed between Rose and Clara. It was so authentic and sweet. Plus their banter was on point. Additionally, I loved that Clara re-examines her friendships throughout the course of the book. Through Clara’s insights, Goo explores toxic friendships and promotes self-reflection. I thought that it was an incredibly valuable message to include. The Way You Make Me Feel is an excellent summer read. Maurene Goo is also officially on my list of auto-buy authors. If you’re looking for a sweet, cute contemporary that packs a subtle emotional punch, definitely pick this one up. *Disclaimer: I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
Jolie More than 1 year ago
Reading Young Adult books are my guilty pleasure. I don’t usually tell people (outside the blogosphere) that I read them. Mainly because I get funny looks. But those looks do not stop me from reading (and reviewing them). I am happy to have seen The Way You Make Me Feel on one of NetGalley’s Read Now emails. I would have missed a fantastic book if I didn’t make the choice to download it. I love Clara’s character growth during the book. In the beginning, she was a headstrong prankster who only looked out for herself and the small group of “friends“. She cared nothing about other people’s feelings. The prom was the catalyst for everything that happened. I am not going to lie, I did giggle at it. I was also horrified. I didn’t blame Rose for doing what she did. By the end of the book, she had done a 180. I loved it!! I thought having Rose and Clara work together on the food truck was a great punishment. As well as giving up their wages to pay the school for the damage. I did think that they were never going to get along (the first day was a disaster). But, there was a gradual (almost snail-paced) friendship forming between Clara and Rose. It was hard to see at first but it was there. I didn’t like Clara’s old group of friends. They egged her on and tried to get her to ditch work more than a few times. The water park fiasco cemented my dislike for them. They didn’t care that the slide was closed, they were going on it. So I wasn’t surprised when people got hurt. I was surprised when Clara decided to back off her friendship with them. But, at that point in the book, she was realizing that life wasn’t all pranks. She was starting to realize that there was more to life than that. Clara and Hamlet were a cute couple. I did think that they weren’t going to actually get together when he was introduced in the book. Clara was too uncertain of her feelings towards him for me to even make a guess at what they were. It was after the disastrous water park trip that I finally got a sense of if they were a couple or not. I didn’t like Clara’s mother. Clara was only convenient to her if her schedule allowed it. Her decisions as a mother were awful. I mean, she partied with her teenager, allowing her to get drunk. Seriously?? That is only the tip of the iceberg with her. I am thankful that Clara had one parent in her life who was always there for her. The end of The Way You Make Me Feel was your typical HEA. I did feel that there were a couple of storylines left up in the air (the one with Adrian and his new girlfriend comes to mind) but other than that, I loved it. The author did a great job of tying everything together.
BookFreakOut More than 1 year ago
Really enjoyed this fun, contemporary YA. While the romance was cute, I think one of the best things about this book is how it includes a "friendship" breakup of sorts, as Clara realizes that just because not caring about anything is easier, doesn't make it a better way to live. I enjoyed how Clara's Korean-Brazilian heritage is effortlessly included as just another facet of the many groups represented in the US, rather than something "other." The descriptions of food throughout the book in particular sounded delicious, I'd order from the KoBra food truck for sure!
book_junkee More than 1 year ago
I got sucked in by that cover and the synopsis and couldn’t wait to get to it. I liked Clara. She’s quite an interesting character. She’s snarky and maybe a little rude, but there’s a lot of potential. I really enjoyed reading her grow from a bratty teenager to someone who knows themselves a bit better and is ready to make changes. Rose and Hamlet were the perfect complements for Clara and the scenes with the three of them together were fun. Hands down, Clara’s dad Adrian was the best. Plot wise it spanned a summer and left me wanting more. I enjoyed the use of the cramped quarters of a food truck to make the girls learn to get along and a lot of this felt like a love letter to LA. I’m now dreaming of my own taco walko. Overall, it was a quick read with characters I found myself rooting for right from the beginning. I will absolutely be checking out Maureen’s other books. **Huge thanks to Farrar, Straus, and Giroux for providing the arc free of charge**
onemused More than 1 year ago
"The Way You Make Me Feel" is a cute YA romance, but it's mostly a book about maturing. Clara has been acting out ever since she began to feel neglected by her mom and rebelled by trying her first (and only) cigarette. She was caught by Rose who tattled on her and got her into trouble. Since then, she's been on a spiral of bad behavior and become the class clown. She was born when her parents were only 18 years old, and they separated soon after. She lives with her father who is determined not to be overbearing like his parents were and tries to do his best for her. He dreams of owning a restaurant and has started with the less expensive food truck option with KoBra. The food truck sells Korean-Brazilian fusion foods around LA, and 16-year-old Clara just finds the brightly painted/colorful truck embarrassing. When Clara is nominated for junior prom court by her friends as a joke, she decides to take the joke a little further and actually run for prom queen. When she wins and pulls another stunt, class president Rose has had enough and begins a physical altercation that starts a small fire in the school. As punishment, Rose and Clara are sentenced to spend the summer together working on the KoBra and paying back the school for damages. Clara's father is stepping up to the plate as a disciplinarian and no longer taking any of her selfishness. It is sure to be a summer of change. Clara is a bit lost- she's selfish, immature, and the class clown. She hides her feelings under a veneer of not caring about anything. She grows and matures as the book progresses- although she has some (big) setbacks, she really begins to see the value of the people she has in her life and who she really wants to be. It's really a story about growing up more than just romance (which is also there and so cute). Clara is sometimes hard to like, but her growth really redeems the book- I think it's a great book for teens, particularly those on the younger side. It offers some perspective and seeing things from other peoples' point-of-view type realizations that is really part of the growing up experience. Overall, I think it's a really great story about maturing and what it means to be a good person, and I think it's a great read for younger teens. Please note that I received an ARC from the publisher through netgalley. All opinions are my own.