The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia

The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia

Audiobook(CD - Library - Unabridged CD)

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Overview

A Wikipedia expert tells the inside story of the trailblazing-and incredibly popular-open-source encyclopedia.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781400140763
Publisher: Tantor Media, Inc.
Publication date: 04/01/2009
Edition description: Library - Unabridged CD
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 6.40(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Andrew Lih has been an administrator at Wikipedia for over four years and a commentator on new media, technology, and journalism issues on CNN, MSNBC, and NPR.

Lloyd James has been narrating since 1996, has recorded over six hundred books in almost every genre, has earned six AudioFile Earphones Awards, and is a two-time nominee for the prestigious Audie Award.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"The [listener] cannot help but become a Wikipedia enthusiast, rooting for the volunteers and lamenting the often public setbacks." —-Library Journal

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The Wikipedia Revolution: How a Bunch of Nobodies Created the World's Greatest Encyclopedia 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
indigo7 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you wonder where things come from, this is an explainer book. It is not especially short and sometimes the audio version may induce sleep. I also went for the print book for comparison; audio has to leave out some things like tables or pictures. The author has been a contributor to Wikipedia for 4 yrs and does try to maintain journalistic neutrality, just as the online information source he is documenting. I found many parts interesting but some areas over-techinated. Overall, I enjoyed the writing and would like to see more about the important area of free access to all human knowledge, maybe sometimes scaled down so as to include those who aren't as well-educated but still want to know about things.