The Year of Living Awkwardly: Sophomore Year

The Year of Living Awkwardly: Sophomore Year

by Emma Chastain

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Overview

Bridget Jones’s Diary meets Mean Girls as lovably flawed high school student Chloe Snow chronicles another year in her life while she navigates the highs and lows of family, friendship, school, and love in a diary that sparkles with humor and warmth.

It’s Chloe Snow’s sophomore year of high school, and life has only grown more complicated.

Last year, Chloe was the star of the musical. This year, after an audition so disastrous she runs off the stage in tears, she’s cast as a lowly member of the ensemble. Will she be able to make it through the show knowing everyone’s either pitying her or reveling in her downfall?

Chloe’s best friend, Hannah, is no help: she’s been sucked into the orbit of Lex, the velvet-gloved, iron-fisted ruler of the sophomore class. Chloe’s dad is busy falling in love with Miss Murphy, and Chloe is no longer speaking to her mother, who is sending her increasingly desperate and unhinged emails from Mexico. As her parents’ divorce negotiations unravel, a custody battle looms.

If only Chloe could talk to Grady about it: his parents are divorced, and he’s easy to talk to. Or he was, until he declared his love for Chloe, and she turned him down because despite all her rational brain cells she can’t seem to get over Mac, and then Grady promptly started going out with Lex.

As the performance of the show approaches, Chloe must find a way to navigate all the messy elements of her life and make it through to the end of the year.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781481488785
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Publication date: 07/10/2018
Series: Chloe Snow's Diary Series , #2
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 290,443
Product dimensions: 5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.40(d)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Emma Chastain is a graduate of Barnard College and the creative writing MFA program at Boston University. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and children.

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The Year of Living Awkwardly: Sophomore Year 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
Charming and funny! Thanks to NetGalley and Simon Pulse for the opportunity to read and review The Year of Living Awkwardly: Sophomore Year by Emma Chastain! Chloe shares her daily experiences through diary entries. She lives with her single father after her mother left them. Chloe's mother went to Mexico with her much younger boyfriend. Needless to say, Chloe is angry at her mother. Chloe and her co-worker Grady have an entertaining relationship. Once school starts, so does the worrying and the drama of high school life. Friendships, dating, the musical and family spin Chloe out of control and she learns about herself in the process. Charming and funny, this realistic fiction is a blast to read with dynamic characters, drama and humor, 5 stars! * I received a complimentary copy of this book for voluntary review consideration and all thoughts and opinions are my own.
kozbisa More than 1 year ago
Rating: 4.5 Stars If I was asked to describe The Year of Living Awkwardly in three words, I would say: delightful, amusing, and honest. When I started this book, I was immediately captured by Chloe's voice. Chloe clearly came across as a 15-year-old teen, and I found her musings, observations, frustrations, and fears very believable. I fell in love with her. I was happy, when she was happy, and sad, when she was sad. I raged with her, hurt with her, and even swooned with her. There were so many times I wanted to reach into the book and give her a hug, because this was a tough year for Chloe. She experienced a lot of disappointments during her sophomore year. There was her parents' divorce, growing apart from her best friend, losing some other valuable friendships, and additional smaller, but no less disheartening, let downs. However, all these were valuable life lessons for Chloe, and only made her stronger and wiser. Confession: I read this book, and then went back and read the first book. From my personal experience, I can tell you that the book stands on its own. Chastain fills in all the pertinent details, and you will not be lost in the story. Now, I had thought Chloe grew tremendously over the course of this story, but after reading the first book, I was really impressed with how much she changed since her freshman year. It's one of the things I love about this type of series. Getting to watch the character pass so many milestones, make mistakes, and learn from them. I think Chloe's worldview changed a lot from book 1 to book 2, and you see it in her self-awareness. There were many times I was really proud of Chloe in this book. She made some decisions, which could have been social suicide, nipped some toxic relationships in the bud, faced some big fears, and acknowledged some of her own shortcomings. This was such a huge difference from High School Disaster Chloe. The diary format is one I really enjoy. I feel like the character can just share their thoughts without any filter, since this is being written just for them. It's confessional in nature and usually quite revealing. Chloe's shares were quite sincere, and often hilarious. I laughed so much while reading this book, but I also thought some of Chloe's entries were insightful, and I enjoyed getting to know her so well. Overall: What a wonderful and fun year I got to spend with Chloe! Chloe will join Ruby Oliver and Georgia Nicholson on my list of confessional protagonists, who I love. I look forward to spending Junior and Senior year with Chloe!
HowUsefulItIs More than 1 year ago
About: The Year of Living Awkwardly is a young adult fiction written by Emma Chastain. It will be published on 7/10/18 by Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, 384 pages. The genres are young adult, contemporary, and fiction. This book is intended for readers ages 12 and up, grades 7 and up. This is actually book 2 of the Chloe Snow’s Diary series: book one was called Confessions of a High School Disaster. My Experience: I started reading The Year of Living Awkwardly on 6/27/18 and finished it on 6/30/18. This book is an excellent read! I enjoy high school reads a lot, especially when books are upbeat and easy going like this one. It has humor and a diverse of characters exploring who they are and how they perceive themselves. The mean girl Reese is tolerable. I like her smart mean under the guise of being nice rather than being outwardly wicked mean. For this, I can understand how Chloe feels being on the receiving end. I like Tristan and Chloe’s friendship. Tristan’s love life really pulls at my heart strings. Although this book comes from a series, I feel it’s fine to read as a standalone. It does reference to last year (book 1) but if you are curious like me, you may want to pick it up. This book is told in the first person point of view following Chloe Snow expressing herself in a diary format. She lives with her lawyer dad while her mom runs off to Mexico with a younger man. This book started out with Chloe working at the pool and flirting with Grady. Coming Sept, Chloe will start her Sophomore year at High School while Grady starts his Freshman year. The year started awkwardly already because her dad is going out on dates with her favorite teacher. She worries her classmates will tease her when they found out. In addition to that, Grady told her he likes her but she told him she’s not into younger guys. Chloe wants to do something memorable this year at the Halloween dance, but what she planned for, something else happened and she regrets not keeping her eyes closed. A well written book, The Year of Living Awkwardly is a fast paced and fun read. Chloe can be relatable to many readers. She beats herself up, not physically, when it seems obvious what she should do but instead do the opposite. She feels gross for enjoying gossips after it happened. She has plans to put herself out there and do something more. I feel like I’m reading about me sometimes, especially how she feels when summer vacation is over. She thought she should’ve done more. I like how Chloe pep talk herself about how it’s okay to sit alone because I’m the same way, I would rather stay home than go to the movies/restaurant alone. I like her relationship with her dad. I highly recommend everyone to read this book if you are looking for some light reading. Pro: fast pace, page turner, easy to read, humor, diversity, relatable, friendship, teen love Con: none I rate it 5 stars! ***Disclaimer: Many thanks to Simon & Schuster for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest. xoxo, Jasmine at How Useful It Is at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
ImaginaryReads More than 1 year ago
Chloe has a fun voice and sense of humor that takes me back to my teenage years, back when everything was supposed to be simple, but wasn’t because of teenage awkwardness. This book reads just like a diary entry. Many of the entires are short and filled with thoughts as they come to Chloe. While there are consistent themes, like family, friendship, and romance, there are also many smaller subplots following Chloe’s journey into sophomore year, and they get resolved at different times. This is great in that it reflects actual life, but it was a bit harder to read as a book because I wanted to have a unifying plot to follow. That said, I enjoyed seeing Chloe’s growth as she takes the lessons that she learned freshman year. She still has much to learn, but she’s grown more mature and is capable of handling issues that were overwhelming to her as a freshman. I especially like how Chloe comes to realizations about what is important in life. Such as finding meaning in the role she’s given, being a true friend when others won’t be, and learning to love people who are hard to love. Lastly, she learns that romantic love isn’t all about the sparks and the immediate physical attraction or even about looking for someone higher up on the social hierarchy. What’s important is finding someone who genuinely cares about you and will be by your side.
ImaginaryReads More than 1 year ago
Chloe has a fun voice and sense of humor that takes me back to my teenage years, back when everything was supposed to be simple, but wasn’t because of teenage awkwardness. This book reads just like a diary entry. Many of the entires are short and filled with thoughts as they come to Chloe. While there are consistent themes, like family, friendship, and romance, there are also many smaller subplots following Chloe’s journey into sophomore year, and they get resolved at different times. This is great in that it reflects actual life, but it was a bit harder to read as a book because I wanted to have a unifying plot to follow. That said, I enjoyed seeing Chloe’s growth as she takes the lessons that she learned freshman year. She still has much to learn, but she’s grown more mature and is capable of handling issues that were overwhelming to her as a freshman. I especially like how Chloe comes to realizations about what is important in life. Such as finding meaning in the role she’s given, being a true friend when others won’t be, and learning to love people who are hard to love. Lastly, she learns that romantic love isn’t all about the sparks and the immediate physical attraction or even about looking for someone higher up on the social hierarchy. What’s important is finding someone who genuinely cares about you and will be by your side.