The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman: A Short Story Masterpiece by American Woman Writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman: A Short Story Masterpiece by American Woman Writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman

by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

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Overview

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Gilman - is a much celebrated and classic tale by one of the worlds most loved authors. This work is considered an important early work in feminist literature and one which explored issues about women's health, both physical and mental. It is an important and influential work, and a great addition to any book collection.

This short story is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature, illustrating attitudes in the 19th century toward women's health, both physical and mental. Presented in the first person, the story is a collection of journal entries written by a woman whose physician husband (John) has rented an old mansion for the summer. Forgoing other rooms in the house, the couple moves into the upstairs nursery. As a form of treatment, the unnamed woman is forbidden from working, and is encouraged to eat well and get plenty of exercise and air, so she can recuperate from what he calls a "temporary nervous depression - a slight hysterical tendency", a diagnosis common to women in that period. Gilman used her writing to explore the role of women in America at the time. She explored issues such as the lack of a life outside the home and the oppressive forces of the patriarchal society. Through her work Gilman paved the way for writers such as Alice Walker and Sylvia Plath.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9782491251314
Publisher: Les Prairies Numeriques
Publication date: 07/21/2020
Pages: 18
Sales rank: 606,815
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.04(d)

About the Author

Who Was Charlotte Perkins Gilman?
Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born on July 3, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut. She published her best-known short story "The Yellow Wall-Paper" in 1892. One of her greatest works of non-fiction, Women and Economics, was published in 1898. Along with writing books, she established a magazine, The Forerunner, which was published from 1909 to 1916. Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935, in Pasadena, California.

Early Life
Gilman was born on July 3, 1860, in Hartford, Connecticut. Gilman was a writer and social activist during the late 1800s and early 1900s. She had a difficult childhood. Her father, Frederick Beecher Perkins was a relative of well-known and influential Beecher family, including the writer Harriet Beecher Stowe. But he abandoned the family, leaving Charlotte's mother to raise two children on her own. Gilman moved around a lot as a result and her education suffered greatly for it.

Marriage and Inspiration
Gilman married artist Charles Stetson in 1884. The couple had a daughter named Katherine. Sometime during her decade-long marriage to Stetson, Gilman experienced severe depression and underwent a series of unusual treatments for it. This experience is believed to have inspired her best-known short story "The Yellow Wall-Paper" (1892).

Women's Rights Activism
While she is best known for her fiction, Gilman was also a successful lecturer and intellectual. One of her greatest works of nonfiction, Women and Economics, was published in 1898. A feminist, she called for women to gain economic independence, and the work helped cement her standing as a social theorist. It was even used as a textbook at one time. Other important nonfiction works followed, such as The Home: Its Work and Influence (1903) and Does a Man Support His Wife? (1915).

Along with writing books, Gilman established The Forerunner, a magazine that allowed her to express her ideas on women's issues and on social reform. It was published from 1909 to 1916 and included essays, opinion pieces, fiction, poetry and excerpts from novels.

Death
In 1900, Gilman had married for the second time. She wed her cousin George Gilman, and the two stayed together until his death in 1934. The next year she discovered that she had inoperable breast cancer. Gilman committed suicide on August 17, 1935.

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