Theories of Development, Second Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives / Edition 2

Theories of Development, Second Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives / Edition 2

by Richard Peet
ISBN-10:
1606230654
ISBN-13:
2901606230656
Pub. Date:
03/13/2009
Publisher:
Guilford Publications, Inc.

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Overview

Theories of Development, Second Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives / Edition 2

Widely adopted, this text critically evaluates the leading theories of international economic development, from classical economic and sociological models to Marxist, poststructuralist, and feminist perspectives. No other book provides such comprehensive coverage or links the theories as incisively to contemporary world events and policy debates. Reexamining neoliberal conceptions of economic growth, the authors show what a more just and democratic form of development might look like today.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 2901606230656
Publisher: Guilford Publications, Inc.
Publication date: 03/13/2009
Edition description: Second Edition
Pages: 324
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

Richard Peet is Professor of Geography at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he was a founding member of the "radical geography movement" and a long-time editor of Antipode: A Radical Journal of Geography. His interests include development, global policy regimes, power, theory and philosophy, political ecology, and the causes of financial crises. The author of numerous articles, book reviews, and books, Dr. Peet is editor of a new radical journal, Human Geography.

Elaine Hartwick is Associate Professor of Geography at Framingham State College in Framingham, Massachusetts, where she teaches courses in political, cultural, and regional geography and global development. She has published on a variety of topics, including commodity chains, consumer politics, social theory, and development geography, with a regional specialization in Southern Africa.


Table of Contents

1. Development

I. Conventional Theories of Development

2. Classical and Neoclassical Economics

3. From Keynesian Economics to Neoliberalism

4. Development as Modernization

II. Nonconventional, Critical Theories of Development

5. Marxism, Socialism, and Development

6. Poststructuralism, Postcolonialism, and Postdevelopmentalism

7. Feminist Theories of Development

III. Critical Modernism

8. Critical Modernism and Democratic Development

Interviews

Instructors and students in geography, economics, politics, and sociology. Serves as a text in advanced undergraduate- and graduate-level courses such as Development, Economic Geography, Economic Development, and Geographic Theory.

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Theories of Development, Second Edition: Contentions, Arguments, Alternatives 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
willyvan More than 1 year ago
Richard Peet, Professor of Geography at Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, and Elaine Hartwick, Associate Professor of Geography at Framingham State College, Massachusetts, have written a fine study of the leading theories of international economic development. Part 1 looks at theories of development that take the conventional view of Western modernity as the summit of human progress: classical and neoclassical economics, Keynesianism, neoliberalism, and modernization. Part 2 looks at theories of development that are critical of Western modernity: Marxism, socialism, post-structuralism, post-colonialism, post-developmentalism, and feminist theories of development. Part 3 outlines what the authors call critical modernism, democracy, reasoning and planning, science, technology and medicine. They write, "poverty results from extreme inequalities. Poor people are poor because rich people take so much of the income the economy produces." J. F. Kennedy's inaugural address showed the US state's priorities: "if a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich." In the USA, almost half of all families got lower real incomes in 1995 than they had in 1973. The authors praise the efforts made by Venezuela and Cuba and their creation of ALBA, the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America. They note that Cuba has "a life expectancy at birth of 77 years, a 97% literacy rate, and an infant mortality rate of 6 per 1,000 live births (lower than the 9 per 1,000 figure for the United States). This last favourable statistic results from Cubans' access to free healthcare for everyone and from Cuba's having the largest number of physicians (591) per 100,000 people in the world." They observe, "With initial financing of $1 billion, the Bank of ALBA will finance economic integration and infrastructural development as well as fund social, educational, cultural, and health programs in the member countries. Unlike other international financial institutions, such as the World Bank or IMF, the Bank of ALBA will not impose loan conditions and will function on the consensus of all its members."