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These Bees Count!
     

These Bees Count!

5.0 2
by Alison Formento, Sarah Snow (Illustrator)
 

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How do bees count? The bees at the Busy Bee Farm buzz through the sky as one big swarm, fly over two waving dandelions, find three wild strawberries dripping tasty nectar… As the children in Mr. Tate’s class listen, they learn how bees work to produce honey and make food and flowers grow. Bees count—they’re important to us all. Alison

Overview

How do bees count? The bees at the Busy Bee Farm buzz through the sky as one big swarm, fly over two waving dandelions, find three wild strawberries dripping tasty nectar… As the children in Mr. Tate’s class listen, they learn how bees work to produce honey and make food and flowers grow. Bees count—they’re important to us all. Alison Formento’s gentle message is illustrated with Sarah Snow’s bright, realistic papercuts.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Formento's fresh, crisp digital images bring visual variety to the message about the importance of bees in food chains." Publishers Weekly

"With a light, informative narrative and pleasant digital-collage artwork, this picture book offers an engaging introduction to bees." Booklist (Online Review)

"...the adventures of this multicultural class of kids are sure to interest readers, and Snow makes it easy to identify and count the items in the pictures. After learning all about how bees count, readers will be counting on Mr. Tate's class to give them another environmental armchair trip." Kirkus Reviews

Children's Literature - Carrie Hane Hung
From the author of This Tree Counts!, These Seas Count!, and These Rocks Count! comes another interesting adventure with Mr. Tate’s class. The class takes a bus to Busy Bee Farm where they meet Farmer Ellen. She explains how bees produce honey, and everyone dresses into beekeeper gear before they look at the apiaries on the farm. In the middle of the story, when the bees take off to visit the flowers, Formento weaves counting from one to ten items into the text, as the bees fly to do their work, collecting pollen. The illustrations comprise cut outs that attractively support the text. The end pages greet the reader with golden honeycombs and some bees. The greenery of the plants on the farm, the colors of the flowers, and the amber shades of honey in jars are just a few examples of the beautiful illustrations. At the end of the story, readers will find additional information about honeybees. Children who enjoy nature will probably enjoy this book. Reviewer: Carrie Hane Hung; Ages 4 to 7.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—As with This Tree Counts! (Albert Whitman, 2010), the title of this book has a double meaning. Mr. Tate's class is visiting the Busy Bee Farm. After they are safely garbed in their protective gear, they are taken on a tour by Farmer Ellen, who explains how bees make honey and how important they are in making food and flowers grow. The narrative has an easy conversational flow that maintains interest while providing a wealth of information. The book continues with the literal counting portion as the bees fly out to do their work: "One by one, we zip up high,/buzzing through/the bright blue sky." The collage illustrations are a delight, featuring an inviting landscape of fields and flowers and a multi-ethnic cast of children. The sense of texture in the pictures is palpable to the point that one is almost surprised to find that the paper is flat and smooth. An informative author's note includes information on CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder), a problem currently plaguing beekeepers. Pair this with Laurie Krebs and Valeria Cis's The Beeman (Barefoot, 2008) for a bee-utiful storytime.—Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
Kirkus Reviews
Formento and Snow successfully collaborate again (This Tree Counts! 2010) as the environmentally aware Mr. Tate takes his class on a field trip to Busy Bee Farm. As in their previous text, counting has a dual purpose, with "1, 2, 3" taking a backseat to education. This time, Farmer Ellen helps the children suit up in beekeeping gear, then teaches the class about bees, apiaries and pollination. She encourages the children to listen to the bees' buzz about their work: "We find three wild strawberries bursting with sweetness. / Four apple blossoms tickle us with soft petals." Readers learn along with the class how bees transform nectar into honey and how that honey is extracted. A final author's note goes into more detail about the vital importance of honeybees to agriculture, as well as telling readers more fascinating facts about bees, including their dances, their hierarchy within the hive and the jobs they do. A final paragraph mentions colony collapse disorder. The digital look of the illustrations detracts slightly, catching readers between the nature theme of the text and the rather sterilized artwork. Still, the adventures of this multicultural class of kids are sure to interest readers, and Snow makes it easy to identify and count the items in the pictures. After learning all about how bees count, readers will be counting on Mr. Tate's class to give them another environmental armchair trip. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807578681
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
03/01/2012
Series:
These Things Count! Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
525,954
Product dimensions:
10.90(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
AD950L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Alison Formento grew up in Arkansas and now lives in New Jersey with her husband, two kids, a dog, and a few fish. She's climbed trees, camped under them, and planted some, too. Alison enjoys hiking in the woods, where it's always fun to count trees. She also loves jumping rope, which helps shake out a lot of ideas. Her first book was This Tree Counts. She can be found on the internet at www.alisonashleyformento.com. Sarah Snow is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design. She is a collage artist who works combining found papers, acrylics, and watercolor. She now lives in the beautiful Hudson Valley with three cute boys and a view.

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These Bees Count! 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
This_Kid_Reviews_Books More than 1 year ago
“Mr. Tate’s class loves taking field trips. Today their bus went to a farm.” At first the kids thought it was strange that all there was on the farm were flowers and trees. Then they find out it is a bee farm and bees live there. Then they learn about how bees are so important to plants, flowers and us! They also listen to the buzzing of the bees and hear the bees’ song. Why I liked this book – This is a great book for young kids to learn about how bees are very important. It also talks about how bees make honey. I like that during the “Bees’ song” the bees count up to ten, which also teaches young kids how to count. This is a great book for ALL ages! I love Ms. Formento’s book! I can’t wait to read her “These Trees Count” book and the newest book in the series, “These Seas Count”! **NOTE I bought a copy of this book at a festival.
NJGREENGIRL More than 1 year ago
I gave Cate Alison's and Sarah's first book, This Tree Count, and Cate loved it. When she got These Bees Count, she was so happy to see the children from the first book having a new adventure. She made her grandfather read it three times that first day, and she pored over it, finding each of the characters she remembered, and delighting in their day at the farm, with the flowers and bees and honey!