Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged, 7 CDs, 8 hrs. 15 min.)

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Overview

Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, Peter Francis James

With over eight million copies in print world wide, Achebe's work is a definitive novel in African literature. Filled with powerful language and finely drawn characters, Things Fall Apart also shimmers with the sounds and sights of village life. Okonkwo is born into poverty, with a wastrel for a father. Driven by ambition, he works tirelessly to gain the prosperity of many fields and wives and prestige in his village. But he is harsh as well as diligent. As he sees the traditions of his people eroded by white missionaries and government officials, he lashes out in anger. Things Fall Apart traces the growing friction between village leaders and Europeans determined to save the heathen souls of Africa. But its hero, a noble man who is driven by destructive forces, speaks a universal tongue.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781402573729
Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
Publication date: 12/28/2003
Edition description: Unabridged, 7 CDs, 8 hrs. 15 min.
Sales rank: 509,111
Product dimensions: 5.48(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.82(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Chinua Achebe (1930–2013) was born in Nigeria. Widely considered to be the father of modern African literature, he is best known for his masterful African Trilogy, consisting of Things Fall Apart, Arrow of God, and No Longer at Ease. The trilogy tells the story of a single Nigerian community over three generations from first colonial contact to urban migration and the breakdown of traditional cultures. He is also the author of Anthills of the SavannahA Man of the PeopleGirls at War and Other StoriesHome and ExileHopes and ImpedimentsCollected PoemsThe Education of a British-Protected ChildChike and the River, and There Was a Country. He was the David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University and, for more than fifteen years, was the Charles P. Stevenson Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Achebe was the recipient of the Nigerian National Merit Award, Nigeria’s highest award for intellectual achievement. In 2007, Achebe was awarded the Man Booker International Prize for lifetime achievement.

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Things Fall Apart (African Writers Series) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 167 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Classic fiction by one of Africas best authors
kelsey dubose More than 1 year ago
The book was good. i did not think that i would like it. Only reason i might have thought that was because i had to read it for school. So it was kind of forced on me but then i realy got into the book i wanted to se what happens to him and i really started to like reading about their native ways. And that is what i think made the book so good was that it had someting that a lot of books that i read do not have and that is why i think this book is a good book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing story that makes you rethink your stances on religious issues
Lucas Tometich More than 1 year ago
changes the way you look at certain things in life!! favorite book ever!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
'Things Fall Apart' was unlike any book I have ever read. The plot, country, and characters were totally original, at least comparing those from previous reads. The setting of the book is in Nigeria and from what I understood, the time frame was around the slave trade period. Chinua Achebe has a vivid imagination and has a gift for transitioning what is in his head into document and making it seem realistic. I found interest in reading this book from my grandma and mother. Plus, my mom was making me read the required books to have been read for a city nearby, this just so happened to be on the list. In a way, I was forced to read it, but at the same time I was looking for new genres of novels and unique book selections. The novel starts out with the history of a tribal man and how he was doomed for failure through his personal chi -or god-. The man's name was Onkonwo and his father was considered a woman. This was because he had gained no title in life and therefore had not 'become a man'. Unoka, in fact, was a coward and a loafer. He was a poor man leaving his wife and children hardly enough to eat. People mocked him and swore they would not dare lend him any more money. However, Unoka always succeeded in borrowing more, along with piling up his debts. Unoka died, before he could pay back any of his debts and leaving Onkonkwo to feed his family. On the other hand, Onkonkwo had already accomplished more than his father when Unoka died. He was known for his wrestling skills and was gaining the trust from neighbors to spare him two barns worth of seed yams. In his life, Onkonkwo gained the privilage of having 3 wives and 2 out of 4 titles. Sadly, at the end of Part One Onkonkwo was forced to leave his clan and travel to the land of Mbanta, where the kinsmen of his mother lived. This leads to his new life and the beginning of Part Two of the book. I do believe that it's unique how 'Things Fall Apart' is split into two intertwining stories telling about Onkonkwo's troubles and trials he has to face. The first describes the clash between individual and society gains. The other describes the conflict between tribes and how European missionaries destroy Onkonkwo's tribal world from the inside out. I believe that this book gets slow at many parts. My reasoning simply is: Achebe describes certain parts too much and then whips back to the plot, not describing the parts that spark some interest. The plot is all over and used terms that are foreign and at times un able to comprehend. I have heard many times that it is hard to follow and readers stop reading. Over all, I think this book was an okay read if you have nothing else to read and you like novels with cultural themes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought that this book was cleverly written. The omniscient point of view gave the reader a chance to understand what was going on outside of the main character and sometimes gave an inside look at the minds of the characters that were not the main focus. The development of the book gave subtle hints of the not so shocking (to me at least) ending. I greatly enjoyed reading the book and I hope that others have an opportunity to pick it up as well.
Anonymous 4 months ago
Hey
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Liked the storyline ending was unexpected
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Things Fall Apart is a historical novel that was written Chinua Achebe in 1959. The novel follows the life of Okonkwo, a member of the Ibo tribe in Africa. Okonkwo was the son of a man named Unoka, who was considered a failure. Unoka was lazy and lacked the qualities that made a strong man. Due to the lack of wealth that his father had, Okonkwo was forced to build his wealth from the ground up. Okonkwo was a person of power in the tribe due to the large farm and family he built over time. Okonkwo was forced to leave the clan for 7 years when his gun accidentally detonated during a party, and killed a young boy. Okonkwo honored his punishment and spent 7 years away from the tribe. During this time white missionaries arrived in the area and began to integrate into the tribes. The missionaries began by building churches in the tribes and slowly converting the people of the tribe to Christianity. When Okonkwo returned to his village, Umuofia, he was shocked to see that the missionaries had started to take over the clan. The missionaries implemented a legal system that prevented the villagers from harming the Christians. The village planned a meeting to decide on a plan of action. Okonkwo was filled with hate because of the way the Christians had to tried to change his tribe. During the meeting a group of Christians arrived to break up the meeting. Okonkwo was controlled by his hate, and without even thinking he killed one of the Christians with a machete. Okonkwo knew that the Christian’s legal system would destroy the remainder of his life. Okonkwo decided that the only solution was to kill himself. Okonkwo killed himself to escape the wrath of the Christian legal system. His death marked the end of the small revolution the village had against the Christians. This novel did an excellent job of shedding new light on white expeditions to spread Christianity. I failed to realize the turmoil and destruction that these expeditions caused. I never realized that although the expeditioners might have brought new technologies, they were destroying the lives of the native people. Although the Christians brought prosperity to the Ibo tribe, it still destroyed their previous way of life. I would highly suggest that everyone reads this book. Things Fall Apart is one of those books that helps the reader develop a deeper understanding for the world that we live in. This novel personalizes the facts, and stories, that we learn in history class. It demonstrates the effects of Christian conquests . Also, a cultural appreciation can be gained through reading this novel. Besides the historical implications, this novel gives the reader an understanding of the type of culture that the villages had. Although the cultures were starkly different to our own, learning about them is very intriguing. The difference in culture explains why the villagers weren’t willing to throw themselves at Christianity. Converting to Christianity meant stripping away the religion that they had lived with all of their life, which justifies why the villagers were frustrated with the Christians that were trying to convert them. I highly suggest this novel to everyone, because it helps illustrate the effects of the Christian conquests, and the Ibo culture.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thus book sucks
PrincessicaOfBooks More than 1 year ago
It's not the fact that it is a required read so I automatically disliked it. Though I dread reading required reads, I know that some turn out to be quite well. I dislike Things Fall Apart because it was just poor writing. Because this is meant to be a mini review, here is a list of things I disliked: -Though Okonkwo is suppose to be a "tragic hero" I have no sympathy for him. He is a cruel coward who doesn't deserve any happiness given to him. In result, I was not sad when it ended. -Tying in to Okonkwo being a cruel coward, I didn't have any connection with any of the characters. Nwoye and Ezinma, his son and daughter, are cool, I guess, but even then I don't fully connect with them. -Again with the characters-- Okonkwo is a static character. Though this story revolves around him, he does not change through it all. Even after he journeys into his mother land and taught new ideas, he still goes back to his old ways. Thinking about this, this might just make a tragic hero... barely. -No plot development until the end! Seriously, it's just a series of short stories and flashbacks up until the end. At the end, things start changing. I wish Achebe introduced the conflict sooner. With no plot development, I found myself bored. -Horrible view on gender roles. I get that it's part of their culture, but I was absolutely disgusted by it. However, I don't blame Achebe for this one. -With the embedding of flashbacks combined with the strange names and the proverbs (THE FREAKING PROVERBS!), the writing style is way too symbolic and confusing. Several of my friends and I often questioned, "Wait, was that a flashback? That wasn't? Ok, but what does this proverb even mean? No but really, who picks these required reading list??" Things I did like: -Learn more about the Ibo culture, from an author who is from Africa. I really like this actually! It shows how different all of us are and our different customs. The fact that the author himself is African gives more credit to his name and his story. -The funny use of irony! It actually made me chuckle at times because of how contradicting the characters/culture is. Not in a bad way, but a funny and enjoyable way. -The juxtaposition of Nwoye and Okonkwo. Though a small reason, it ties in with the funny use of irony. In other words, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is a great and quick book for learning more about different cultures and the both positive and negative resultants of cultural collisions. Despite it being short, it dragged on a lot and if it wasn't for school I would probably DNF this one. At the end of the day, I still question who puts together these reading lists. How much do I recommend it? Don't read it unless you have to. Rating: ★★½ out of 5 stars.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a great book but the ending was unexpected
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this book for school and I had a hard time getting through it. Even though Okonkwo was not supposed to be likable, he made the whole book boring. If I didn't read it for school, I would not have finished it. I did however find the sparknotes very helpful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am so impressed with how easy and insightful a read this was. The culture and events were so alien to me that I was surprised by everything that happened from beginning to end, no matter how simply it was stated. Definitely in my favs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book does allot of explaing itself and seams to backtrack on ideas and chariters in the story. I found it very difficult to stay focused on this book because it almost felt like you werent progressing in the story. The main chariter is also a little unrelatable and at times unlikeable. The main good thing about this book is the culture and the clash you get to see in this book. Overall this book is worth reading but i personly wouldent give it any awards.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You mispelled "right" while trying to critcize other peope spelling. You fail at life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
DOUBLE UGH ! CANT YOU GUYS WRIGHT CORECTLY? From,UGH
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am so glad I finally read this book and am excited to finish the trilogy. Achebe masterfully weaves two stories here, and he creates sympathy for a group of people who could represent all humanity. The men and women of Umuofia (like a lot of others worldwide) carry on traditions from their ancestors. While readers may not agree with every aspect of their customs and standards, most people would be resilient if ever a group of foreigners came in and attempted to change everything we have come to believe. We tend to like what we know and rarely are as open to change as we profess to be. Achebe, perhaps, is exemplifying that our religious differences, ironically, are responsible for far too many wars and unnecessary deaths.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dean trotted up the staurs and hesitantly knocked on the floor. Looking down at his feet