Thinking Print: Books to Billboards, 1980-1995

Thinking Print: Books to Billboards, 1980-1995

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Overview

Thinking Print: Books to Billboards, 1980-1995 by Deborah Wye

From Barbara Kruger's screenprinted feminist billboards to Felix Gonzalez-Torres's stacks of posters featuring head shots of people killed by guns; from Elizabeth Murray's colorful abstract lithographs to Anselm Kiefer's woodcuts embedded in Germany history; from Lucian Freud's moody figure study etchings to Donald Judd's rigid, monochromatic, serially geometric woodcuts—Thinking Printis a broad, ambitious, and varied survey of printed art from the last two decades . Exploring the role of prints, deluxe illustrated books, inexpensive artist's books, and editioned multiples in contemporary art, this exceptionally comprehensive volume covers 235 works by some 147 artists, and includes essays on techniques, formats, and themes, as well as biographic notes on all of the artists and publishers. Originally published on the occasion of a 1996 exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780810961647
Publisher: Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date: 09/01/1996
Pages: 160
Product dimensions: 10.82(w) x 9.96(h) x 0.83(d)

About the Author

Vija Celmins was born in Riga, Latvia, in 1938, and immigrated to North America with her family when she was 10 years old. Since the 60s she has received international attention for her renditions of natural scenesooften copied from photographs that lack a point of reference, horizon, or discernible depth of field. A master of several mediums, including oil painting, charcoal, and multiple printmaking processes, Celmins matches a tangible sense of space with sensuous detail in each work. She received a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship in 1997, and retrospectives of her work have traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, London. In 2002, a retrospective of her prints was held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Celmins currently resides in New York and California.

Marilyn Minter was born in 1948 in Shreveport, Louisiana, and lives and works in New York. Her work has appeared at The Museum of Modern Art, P.S. 1 and the Dia Foundation for the Arts in New York, among others, and has been covered in the New York Times the New Yorker, Artforum and Vogue, and is included in the collections of many leading museums.

Martin Puryear was born in 1941 in Washington, D.C., and was educated at Catholic University, the Royal Academy of Art in Stockholm, and Yale University. He has shown his work in exhibitions all over the word, with public works commissioned in Europe, Japan and the United States. His work was included in the 1992 Documenta exhibition, and he represented the United States at the 1989 Sao Paulo Bienal, where he was awardedthe festival's grand prize. He is also the recipient of grants from the Guggenheim and MacArthur foundations.

Art Spiegelman is an internationally acclaimed cartoonist whose graphic novels include the Pulitzer Prize-winning Holocaust tales Maus I and Maus II, which have been translated into 20 languages. Co-founder with wife Francoise Mouly of Raw magazine, he is also a cover artist, contributor, and consulting editor for The New Yorker.

Vito Acconci was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1940. Among the many public institutions that have hosted solo exhibitions of his work in the United States are the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. He has taught at Cooper Union, Parsons School of Design and Yale University.

Vito Acconci was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1940. Among the many public institutions that have hosted solo exhibitions of his work in the United States are the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York. He has taught at Cooper Union, Parsons School of Design and Yale University.

Richard Artschwager was born in 1924 in Washington, D.C., and grew up in New Mexico. He began his studies at Cornell University in 1941 but was called into service for World War II. In 1950 he moved to New York, where he began to design and build furniture, a commercial venture which held great influence over his early sculpture. Artschwager's work is found in the collections of such institutions as The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

John Baldessari was born in National City, California in 1931, and lives and works in Santa Monica, California. His work has been exhibited in museums such as The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, and in art galleries worldwide. He has also recently curated exhibitions at The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, in Washington D.C., The Museum of Modern Art, New York and The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. He is represented by Marian Goodman Gallery in New York.

Christian Boltanski was born in Paris in 1944. His numerous solo exhibitions include shows at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art & Design, in Kansas City, Missouri, and the Contemporary Art Museum in Houston. He has shown four times at the Venice Biennale. Boltanski is represented in New York by the Marian Goodman Gallery.

Francesco Clemente was born in Naples, Italy, in 1952. After studying classical languages, literature and architecture, he turned to art in the 1970s. Although he has spent a great deal of time since the early 1970s living and working in India, he has made New York City his primary residence since 1981. Clemente has been the subject of many major solo exhibitions, including several international traveling retrospectives. He is famed for his many collaborations—with artists such as Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, and poets like Allen Ginsberg, Robert Creeley and Rene Ricard.

Chuck Close was born in Monroe, Washington, in 1940 and studied visual art at Yale University. Photography has been an integral part of his painting process since the mid-60s, and later became a body of work in its own right. Close has also distinguished himself as a master of printmaking. Since 1967 his work has been the subject of more than 100 major exhibitions throughout the world.

Jim Dine was born in Cincinnati in 1935 and made his entrance into the New York art world in the late 1950s. His paintings, drawings, photographs and sculpture have since been shown at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Guggenheim Museum, New York. Dine has taught art at Yale, Oberlin and Cornell.

Painter Carroll Dunham was born in 1949 in New Haven, Connecticut. One of New York's most influential contemporary painters, Dunham has had recent solo exhibitions at the Gladstone and Nolan/Eckman galleries, New York; Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles; and White Cube, London. His 2002 mid-career retrospective at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York was one of the most highly regarded shows of that year. Dunham writes regularly for Artforum.

Eric Fischl was born in New York City in 1948. He received a BFA from the California Institute for the Arts in 1972. His work has been the subject of numerous important exhibitions including: the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Milwaukee Art Museum, Milwaukee; and the Museum of Contemparary Art, Chicago. Fischl lives and works in New York City and Sag Harbor, NY.

Lucian Freud has been described as the greatest figurative artist working today. In a career spanning more than six decades, he has redefined portraiture and the nude through his dispassionate and unblinking scrutiny of the human body. Although he is best known as a painter, etching has been a constant and integral part of his studio practice since 1982. Born in Berlin in 1922, he moved with his family to Britain in 1933 and became a naturalized British citizen in 1939. He lives and works in London.

Born in London in 1946, Hamish Fulton has walked around the world. His work has been exhibited at various international venues, including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; the Kunstmuseum, Basel; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.

Felix Gonzalez-Torres was born in Cuba in 1957 and grew up in Puerto Rico before moving to New York City. His work has been the subject of several major solo exhibitions both during his life and after his death in 1996. His estate is represented by Andrea Rosen Gallery in New York.

Ann Hamilton was born in 1956 in Lima, Ohio. She trained in textile design at the University of Kansas, and later received an MFA from Yale University. While her degree is in sculpture, textiles and fabric have continued to be an important part of her work, which includes installations, photographs, videos, performances, and objects. In recent work, she has experimented with exchanging one sense organ for another. In 1993, she won a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship. As the 1999 American representative at the Venice Biennale, she addressed topics of slavery and oppression in American society with an installation that used walls embossed with Braille. After teaching at the University of California at Santa Barbara from 1985 to 1991, she returned to Ohio, where she lives and works.

Keith Haring was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1958. In 1978 he moved to New York to attend the School of Visual Arts, where he made his mark with graffiti-inspired large-scale images. He worked with street artists like Jean-Michel Basquiat during his early years in New York. His cartoonlike stick figures made him a huge star in American art during the 1980s, when he was exhibiting and working on projects throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia. In 1986 the artist opened his own retail outlet, The Pop Shop, in New York, and engaged in projects of an extraordinarily diverse nature, from murals on the Berlin Wall to paintings on hot air balloons, motorcars, and decorative accessories. A giant "spectacolor" billboard broadcast his famous Radiant Child image in Times Square, first in 1982. He died of AIDS in 1990.

Jenny Holzer was born in 1950 in Gallipolis, Ohio. She first came to prominence in New York in the late 70s and early 80s. Among other awards she has received, Holzer in 1990 became the first woman to ever win the Leone d'Oro at the Venice Biennale. Her work has been exhibited in most every major museum around the world, and she has created installations for public and private sites including the Reichstag and the Times Square Spectacolor billboard in New York.

Roni Horn was born in 1955 in New York, where she continues to live and work. Since earning her MFA from Yale University in 1978, she has shown her sculptures, installations and photographs extensively throughout the world. She has had solo exhibitions at the Dia Center for the Arts, the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Her recent publications include Dictionary of Water, Cabinet of, Wonderwater (Alice Offshore), and Index Cixous (Cix Pax).

Jorg Immendorff was born in 1945 in Bleckede, Germany. As a young man, he studied stagecraft and stage design in Dusseldorf before moving on to study art under the tutelage of Joseph Beuys in 1964. The mid-60s were a time of great social crisis in Germany, and Immendorff responded by creating his seminal first body of work, the politically charged "LIDL," the sound of which was meant to evoke that of a baby's rattle, and thus to ridicule the idea of the precious aesthetic object and elitist art traditions. In future works, Immendorff continued to subvert and skewer his countryis politics, art and the world in general. His work has been exhibited throughout Europe, Asia and the United States, including recent solo exhibitions at Anton Kern Gallery and Michael Werner Gallery in New York and Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia.

Jasper Johns was born in 1930 in South Carolina, where he grew up wanting to be an artist. Emerging in the late 50s as a force in the American art scene, his richly worked paintings of maps, flags, and targets led the artistic community away from abstract expressionism toward a new emphasis on the concrete, paving the way for Pop Art and minimalism. The artist lives and works in New York.

Donald Judd was born in 1928. Convinced that Abstract Expressionism had deteriorated into fakery, Judd began around 1960 to search for an art free of falsehood. In search of a greater simplicity and clarity, he evolved a formal vocabulary of identical rectangular units constructed of industrial materials. He died in 1994.

Alex Katz was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1927. Since 1954, he has been exhibiting his paintings at galleries and museums throughout the world, including a major retrospective organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, and many other museum shows in the United States. He has received a Guggenheim fellowship, an NEA grant, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His work is included in virtually every major public collection in the United States.

Mike Kelley, one of the most controversial, prolific and influential figures in contemporary art, was born in 1954 in Detroit, Michigan, and earned a Bachelors degree from the University of Michigan and a Masters from California Institute of the Arts. His work, often wickedly humorous and drawing on both high art and the vernacular with distinctively American iconography, ranges across media such as drawing, painting, sculpture, music, performance, writing and video projects, the last often in collaboration with artists such as Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon and Tony Oursler. In 1993, The Whitney Museum of American Art held a major retrospective of his work. He lives in Los Angeles, and is a member of the graduate faculty at Art Center College of Design, Pasadena.

Mike Kelley, one of the most controversial, prolific and influential figures in contemporary art, was born in 1954 in Detroit, Michigan, and earned a Bachelors degree from the University of Michigan and a Masters from California Institute of the Arts. His work, often wickedly humorous and drawing on both high art and the vernacular with distinctively American iconography, ranges across media such as drawing, painting, sculpture, music, performance, writing and video projects, the last often in collaboration with artists such as Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon and Tony Oursler. In 1993, The Whitney Museum of American Art held a major retrospective of his work. He lives in Los Angeles, and is a member of the graduate faculty at Art Center College of Design, Pasadena.

Ellsworth Kelly was born in Newburgh, New York in 1923. His first one-person exhibition was held in 1951 in Paris, where he was studying on the G.I. Bill following World War II. Kelly returned to the United States in 1954, renting a studio in downtown New York, and his position among America's most esteemed painters began to take form. Since that time, the artist's work has been the subject of numerous major retrospectives worldwide and is presently included in all of the most important public collections of contemporary art. The drawings reproduced in this volume were on view at Matthew Marks Gallery in November, 2006, accompanying a major exhibition of new paintings and sculpture. Kelly currently lives and works in upstate New York.

Anselm Kiefer was born in 1945 in Donaueschingen, Germany. In 1966 he left law studies at the University of Freiburg to study art in Freiburg, Karlsruhe and Dusseldorf. His massive paintings confront twentieth-century German history head on, employing Kiefer's own array of visual symbols to comment on tragic aspects of German history and culture, particularly the Nazi era. Kieferi's work has been exhibited throughout the world in most major museums.

Martin Kippenberger was born in Dortmund, Germany, in 1953, to a mine director and a dermatologist. He showed artistic talent, and independence, at at early age, boycotting art classes in elementary school after a teacher gave him only the second highest grade. Since then his work has been exhibited at museums and galleries worldwide, including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Until his death in 1997, he lived and worked in Austria.

Barbara Kruger was born in Newark, New Jersey, in 1945. Solo exhibitions of her work have been mounted at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Kruger lives in New York and Los Angeles.

One of the most beloved of American pop artists, Roy Lichtenstein was born in 1923 in New York, and studied there at the Art Students League and later at Ohio State University, during which he completed a three-year tour of duty in the army. His early work was based on American genre and history painting, and took on Cubist and Expressionist styles. His first proto-Pop work was created in 1956; his first pop 'Brushstroke' painting appeared in 1965. Lichtenstein died in 1997.

Richard Long was born in 1945 in Bristol, England, where he still lives and works. Since the late 60s he has been exhibiting his work throughout the world. Among the U.S. venues where he has had solo shows are the Guggenheim Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston.

Brice Marden was born in Bronxville, New York in 1938. He studied art at Boston University and Yale University in the late 50s and early 60s, developing a preoccupation with rectangular formats and the repeated use of a muted, unique palette. Moved to New York after graduation, he worked as a guard at the Jewish Museum and came into contact with the work of Jasper Johns, furthering his interest in gridded compositions. He made his first monochromatic single-panel painting in 1964, the year of his first solo exhibition and a stay in Paris, where he was inspired by the work of Alberto Giacometti. The next few years saw his first solo show in New York, his employment as Robert Rauschenberg's assistant and multiple semesters as a painting instructor at SVA. Throughout the 1970s, Marden's work was showcased at Documenta, in a retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York and in various exhibitions that traveled throughout the United States. Trips to Rome and Pompeii strengthened his interest in Greek and Roman art and architecture. In the mid-1980s, Marden turned away from Minimalism toward gestural abstraction, traveling to Thailand to learn about calligraphy and the art of the brush stroke. He continued to exhibit regularly in New York throughout the 1990s and was the subject of two major traveling shows. Marden currently lives in New York City and Hydra, Greece.

Annette Messager, born in France in 1943, has been working since the 1960s and showing since the 1970s. Her portfolio includes painting, embroidery, sculpture, assemblage, collage, film montage and writing. She says of her work that, "Conceptual art interests me in the same way as the art of the insane, astrology, and religious art. It's not the ideologies which these areas perpetuate [that] interest me: they are for me, above all else, repertories of forms. I make fun of sorcery and alchemy even if I make full use of their signs.

Matt Mullican was born in 1951 in Santa Monica, California, and he currently lives and works in New York City. He studied at the California Institute of the Arts, and presented his first solo show at the age of twenty-two. His work has been exhibited in the US at the Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum, Artistsi Space, and the Kitchen in New York, the Institute for Contemporary Art in Boston, the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., and abroad in Belgium, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. In 2005 he had a solo show at Tracy Williams Ltd. in New York, and his work appeared in a group exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angelesis Geffen Contemporary space.

Painter Elizabeth Murray (1940-2007) was born and raised in Chicago, where she attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago beginning in 1958. After receiving her MFA from Mills College in Oakland, California, she moved to New York City in 1967, and began showing her work with Paula Cooper Gallery in 1973. She moved to PaceWildenstein in 1995. Long considered one of New York's most innovative and distinctive painters, Murray was best-known for her large, cartoonish, shaped c

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