The Third Translation: A Novel

The Third Translation: A Novel

by Matt Bondurant
2.5 22

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Overview

The Third Translation: A Novel by Matt Bondurant

An ancient mystery, a hidden language, and the secrets of a bizarre Egyptian sect collide in modern-day London in this ingenious novel of seduction, conspiracy, and betrayal alter Rothschild is an American Egyptologist living in London and charged by the British Museum with the task of unlocking the ancient riddle of the Stela of Paser, one of the last remaining real-life hieroglyphic mysteries in existence today. The secrets of the stela-a centuries-old funerary stone-have evaded scholars for thousands of years due to the stela's cryptic reference to a third translation:

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781401382865
Publisher: Hachette Books
Publication date: 04/06/2005
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 720
Sales rank: 999,210
File size: 394 KB
Age Range: 13 - 18 Years

About the Author

Matt Bondurant began working on this novel while living and working in London, and finished it while employed at the British Museum, where he first saw the actual Stela of Paser and learned of its elusive and mysterious third translation. A professor at George Mason University and two-time Bread Loaf scholarship winner, his short stories have appeared in Glimmer Train, the New England Review, and numerous other publications. He lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

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Third Translation 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a solid literary novel in the spirit of Dellilo, Bellow, or Pynchon. I laughed like hell and though the writing sharp and at times mesmerizing. Not a thriller as people seem to think it should be, not at all. Something much bigger and better than that.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a lover of history-mystery books, I was disappointed. Egyptologist Walter Rothschild is working on a third way of translating the mysterious Stela of Paser, when he gets seduced by a young tart who uses him to steal a valuable papyrus from the British Museum. In his attempt to recover the document, he bumbles around with the help of a sensible young English girl, has a series of encounters with weird characters, touches base with his long estranged daughter and before his contract with the museum is up finds there is really no mystery about the stela at all. Rotschild is a totally amoral and unsympathetic protagonist and the plot is tossed around like a bottle in the ocean.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are very few books I don't like. This tops the list. I forced myself to finish, thinking it had to get better. It didn't. There's a week of reading time I'll never get back. Do yourself a favor, read anything else....
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must say that this book wasn't exactly what I expected it was really disapointing. I thought the author put too much descrition and characterization into subjects and scenes that weren't interesting. The book almost caught my attention 200 or so pages in but it just didn't cut it. I like books with research and information in them but this just slowed down a story that wasn't that great to begin with.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has so many (unbelievable) twists and turns you get dizzy, that is if his graphic descriptions of how he bleeds and throbs from repeated facial injuries don't make your head spin first. Halfway through, I had no interest in the main character or his many 'friends', neglected relatives and history. This book focuses too much on the seamy underside of London (you feel dirty after his report on how the streets look in the different neighborhoods he frequents), his flat's toilet, and his roommate's hallitosis and very little on what could be an interesting story. By stating in the book that it's an almost unbelievable thing that the character is experiencing doesn't make it ok to come up with a disjointed 'twist' involving punting, American wrestlers and hari krishnas. I didn't laugh at the idiocy of this book after a while, because I was so nauseous--it's like being thrust upon a high-speed ferris wheel for hours. Here's a thought: perhaps the author should steer clear of the hallucenogens while he's writing and develop a gripping story. Instead he and his publisher have teased the reader by starting a tale about man who translates egyptian artifacts and then neglecting to actually satisfy them.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I received this book from the publisher asking me for a review. I was excited by the subject, but ended up a little disappointed. I have to agree with some of the reviews stating that this book should not be compared to 'The Da Vinci Code' (DVC). While the DVC reads more like a movie script this book is well written. That being said, the story is where I was disappointed. The narrative tends to ramble and be very repetitive. Several points were repeat that I lost interest in them. The main character is a very sorry individual, and try as I might to connect with him it was too difficult. The ending also left me hanging with unresolved story lines.
Guest More than 1 year ago
typically, i love these type of books. i just couldnt get into it at all. i read the first 100 pages or so, and was just so bored, i had to move on.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yes, it's true, if you are interested in reading a sequel to The Da Vinci Code, you will be disappointed. However, if you like writing that is more that is rich in elegant prose, original style, and reminiscent of writers invested in writing, like say, Henry Miller, Alexander Dumas, or Saul Bellow, than Matthew is your man. Unlike many of the best-sellers today, that read more like plot driven screenplays written for made for TV movies, this writing comes out of the literature. Yes the protaganist has a heart. He has issues and an unresolved past. A human character with flaws. Also something we don't find much in modern fiction. Also, the end, has some even more interesting turns and twists. If you like literature, and are interested in what it looks like when it is written in this century, read The Third Translation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am fascinated by Egypt and cryptology. I understand being obsessive compulsive and having your life overtaken by an invading passion. I like reading 'smart' intelligent fiction. Reviews of this book made me VERY eager to read it. Unfortunately the mix of fiction and obscure egyptology did not gel for me. I found it impossible to 'see' and 'feel' through the eyes of Walter Rothschild. The writing is of high-quality, with a wealth of information about the Stela of Paser (and also in string theory) but, while seductive, the book as a whole with its' fish-tailed end is more aggravating than enjoyable..
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book should in no way be compared to The Da Vinci Code. That comparison (along with a love for Egyptology) is how I got suckered in to buying this book and I was kicking myself by the third chapter. The only thing that made me finish the book was stubbornnes because I paid good money for the thing. The main character is a very depressing man who is apparently mentally and physically incapable of making good choices and we are supposed to feel sorry for him as a result. The mystery of the Stela of Paser takes a far second place to his woes. Furthermore, I have never read a book that left so many loose ends flapping about--and if that is a hint from the author that there will be a sequel, I will live with the suspense because I will never pick up another book by this man again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I actually bought this book and returned it the next day. I read about four chapters and got tired of the protagonist's woes with regard to his failed marriage, and estranged daughter. It was depressing, and anticlimatic. Should not be compared to the Da Vinci Code.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After having read The Third Translation I feel like I wasted precious time in the endeavour. Not only did I waste this time but the constant references to smoking-cigarettes-etc. were sickening. I mean, if you take this environment seriously any nonsmoker would stay 180 degrees away from England. I expected more action and a lot less 'smoke'. However, anyone that gets a novel published deserves at least 2 stars.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm always annoyed when a book sounds wonderful and isn't. This book SHOULD have been wonderful. Instead, it was just a jumbled mess - as impossible to decipher as the damn Stela.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are wonderful descriptions of the English scenes; the sights, sounds, and odors are virtually tangible. The interweaving of the cultures of the present and Ancient Egypt are exceptionally noteworthy. However, it is difficult to comprehend the positive reviews and support of prize-winning authors this book has received. Not one direct quote has been encased in quotation marks. The reader must constantly reread dialoge in order to construct the correct meaning because of the lack of quotation marks. There are also numerous sentence fragments, problems with subject-verb agreement, and consistency. All of these grammatical errors have interrupted the flow of story, making the text difficult to read. The chief editor at Hyperion would be remiss in not taking the editor in charge of this book to task. Comparison of this book to The DaVince Code is misleading. The Third Translation does not have the excellerated pace nor the cliff-hanger chapter endings of The DaVince Code; anyone expecting this will be disappointed. However, readers that appreciate the plotting of The DaVince Code will also appreciate the plotting of The Third Translation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished the book and have to say that I enjoyed it. It is different and should not be compared to the Da Vinci Code whatsoever but it is more in the vein of the Geographers Library (as mentioned in another review). The writing at times is stunning in terms of description and use of metaphors. However, the characters and their reactions to various events are not always believable and the plot at times does appear to be careening out of control but in the end it all works out. A major plus for this novel is the injection of Egyption mythology which sometimes is overdone but nevertheless an interesting theme in support of the main character's raison de etre. All in all an excellent first novel by an up and coming author
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sorry any comparison to the Da Vinci Code is unfair to the reader and way out of whack. The only comparison is both books have a 'professor'-end of comparsion. Reading this novel feels like a bad date and you wish it soon would be over. Am a history major so I do enjoy, engaging stories and in depth plot lines and this book does not provide this. Thought the characters were all juvenile and shallow. Plus the word 'I' is over used in every sentence and this became a distraction. This novel should be entered in the annual Bullwer-Lytton writer's competition where the worst stories are submitted. It gets my vote.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As with so many of the mysteries we pursue in life, the key is always in ourselves. The Third Translation is an exquisite read. I cannot say enough about how it pulled, teased, beckoned me, page-by-page, to pursue a mystery I sensed I knew. As the protagonist struggles to unlock the third translation of the stela of paser, the reader is coaxed into wondering about his/her own mysterious 'third translation' -- that elusive way of seeing things that gives us hope, context, meaning (dare I say religion?). Without spoiling the story by prattling on about my thoughts on what it all means, I will say that reading this book is a privilege and a joy. If you like Dan Brown or Umberto Eco, imagine them set in a world populated by original characters more likely to be seen in Tom Robbins or Hunter S. Thompson. This book is scholarly but fun, spiritual yet entertaining, it is mysterious but deceptively real in its use of the offbeat and unexpected. It is also a most wonderful homage to the father of modern literature and his legendary knight-errant (a protagonist you cannot help but love, despite his many shortcomings). I highly recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys investigating the secret to happiness.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Where is the thrill? Where is the mystery? Where is the action? Without the Egyptian prose we have a 'B' novel and that isn't fair to the 'B' novels. Without the DaVinci code this work would never have been published. Sorry..someone else feel the same?
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an introductory novel. Matthew Bondurant does a fantastic job of putting his own life experiances into this work. I know becuase as of right now he is still my English 201 teacher at George Mason University. It is interesting to see how his stories of himself living in London, such as his room, and history museum worker made it to the book. I enjoy learning from him each week, and hope this book of his does well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Almost taking a page from his own life debut novelist Bondourant selects a middle-aged Egyptologist as his protagonist. This character, Walter Rothschild, is working for the British Museum, assigned to unraveling the mystery of the Stela of Paser, an ancient funerary stone. In actuality, Bondourant began working on this novel while living in London and employed by the British Museum. His attention to detail adds greatly to his setting; his knowledge of ancient Egypt provides intriguing backdrop material. As our story opens Rothschild is close to solving the puzzle, the baffling third translation. His work is interrupted by a young woman who voices an interest not only in Rothschild's work but in the man himself. Their liaison, which takes place in the Museum after hours, results in one less antiquity. His lover has stolen a priceless papyrus and seemingly disappeared. Rothschild's search for the papyrus and the woman leads him to a modern day cult complete with menacing henchman and worshipers of an Egyptian sun god. As it turns out, not only is Rothschild's work on the line but also his life. Voice actor Paul Michael has a degree in drama from the University of British Columbia, and the perfect tonal quality to deliver this tale. His articulate reading enhances a tale that is both erudite and suspenseful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really never spend much time writing reviews, but just finished 'The Third Translation,' and absolutely fell in love with it! I read mostly literary novels and short story collections, but a friend recommended Matt Bondurant's first novel, and I couldn't put it down. The writing is eloquent, interesting, informative, and original. I can't wait for his next book--what a great introductory novel by a new writer!
Guest More than 1 year ago
For the opposite reasons that I had to toss ¿The Da Vinci Code¿ onto the top of my unread pile of poorly written novels, I was happily entranced and engaged by ¿The Third Translation.¿ In this novel I found all of the things that were missing with Dan Brown¿s narrative¿Bondurant gives you original and human characters, real world sorrow and confusion that one expects in good literature, unsettling and wonderful plot movements, and the confident craft of tension that is seen more often in the works of Chabon and Irving. Matt Bondurant is a novelist with a long and brilliant career ahead of him¿rarely have I picked up a first novel from a new writer and been so impressed with the characters, tension, and craft of the narrative. Unlike the pulp mysteries that ¿The Third Translation¿ is compared to, this novel is filled with brave and original characters who challenge us with their particular obsessive behaviors¿there is no comparison between the obtuse brilliance of Bondurant¿s Walter Rothschild and the ¿Indiana Jones¿ mimicry of Dan Brown¿s Robert Langdon. It is a shame that these two novels are even being compared, and it is a disservice to Bondurant¿s craft that they are mentioned in the same breath. That said, if one enjoys the pressure and tempo of novels like TDVC, I would recommend they take the next step into the realm of literary suspense that Bondurant represents so splendidly. Bondurant intersperses complicated Egyptology within the constricts of the novel (a difficult task in itself) as the plot runs us through the London underground, the British Museum, Soho, Covent Garden, etc. His adept handling of this monumental task is tempered with the wonderful humor of the novel, not to mention the great pathos he develops for the main characters (not since Ignacious J. Reilly from ¿A Confederacy of Dunces,¿ have I fallen in love with such an unloveable character). But more than all of these great qualities, this novel is written with great care and great ability¿Bondurant mixes the complicated axioms of the scholarly with the equally poignant world of the mad and fetid London club scene. Often, this transition from the sterility of the British Museum to the urine soaked cobbled streets of Soho reminds me of those transitional moments of cytology and whale lore in ¿Moby Dick.¿ Beyond all of this, however, TTT is a fun and uproariously wild ride that will make you ache for the feral madness of London. It is human, absurd, wonderful. It is literary, scholarly, intense, and untamed. If you are like me, you will consume this one in a day, then start over in order to discover what you might have missed on the first read.