This Is How You Lose Her

This Is How You Lose Her

by Junot Díaz
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Overview

This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz

Finalist for the 2012 National Book Award

Time and People Top 10 Book of 2012
Finalist for the 2012 Story Prize
Chosen as a notable or best book of the year by The New York TimesEntertainment WeeklyThe LA TimesNewsday, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, the iTunes bookstore, and many more...
 

"Electrifying." –The New York Times Book Review 

Exhibits the potent blend of literary eloquence and street cred that earned him a Pulitzer Prize… Díaz’s prose is vulgar, brave, and poetic.”O Magazine

From the award-winning author, a stunning collection that celebrates the haunting, impossible power of love.

On a beach in the Dominican Republic, a doomed relationship flounders. In a New Jersey laundry room, a woman does her lover’s washing and thinks about his wife. In Boston, a man buys his love child, his only son, a first baseball bat and glove. At the heart of these stories is the irrepressible, irresistible Yunior, a young hardhead whose longing for love is equaled only by his recklessness—and by the extraordinary women he loves and loses.

In prose that is endlessly energetic, inventive, tender, and funny, these stories lay bare the infinite longing and inevitable weakness of the human heart. They remind us that passion always triumphs over experience, and that “the half-life of love is forever.”

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781594631771
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/03/2013
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 34,870
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Junot Díaz was born in the Dominican Republic and raised in New Jersey. He is the author of the critically acclaimed Drown; The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award; and This Is How You Lose Her, a New York Times bestseller and National Book Award finalist. He is the recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, PEN/Malamud Award, Dayton Literary Peace Prize, Guggenheim Fellowship, and PEN/O. Henry Award. A graduate of Rutgers College, Díaz is currently the fiction editor at Boston Review and the Rudge and Nancy Allen Professor of Writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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This Is How You Lose Her 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Author Junot Diaz has crafted a wonderful, intensely entertaining story about Yunior, a young Dominican immigrant who previously appeared as a side character in his Pulitzer Prize winning novel "The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao". In this book Yunior is the central figure, occupying a place in nearly all of the nine tales within. The main theme of the stories involves his search for love. Like with most of us, the search contains a myriad of ups and downs. Yunior grew up in the macho, Dominican world of his male role models, namely his father and brother. While learning from their ways with women, Yunior finds himself interested in other, less macho pursuits, such as comic books and science fiction. The book jumps from his first days in the U.S. as a young boy (learning to speak English from TV) to his teen years and through adulthood. Diaz's writing is infused with pop culture references (most of which I got), Spanish slang (some of which I got), and Dominican references. The tales run the gamut from funny to sad to uplifting. The chapter about the death of his older brother from cancer was particularly affecting and stayed with me. Overall, it's a fascinating pastiche of stories, all with the central theme of love, romance, and even sex. Diaz has crafted a tale worthy of the many comparisons to author Phillip Roth. His stories all intertwine together with a familiar voice, to make a read worthy of a Pulitzer Prize winning novelist. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in the complexities of how the male psyche deals with love, culture, and finding oneself. If you enjoy this book, I highly recommend that you read Anthony Youn's "In Stitches." This immensely entertaining memoir follows the author, an Asian American, as he struggles with many of the same poignant relationship issues as Yunior, except with a completely different set of surroundings and upbringing. While reading Diaz's book, I was reminded many times of Youn's story, and the fact that our longing for love is universal, no matter our race, ethnicity, or personality. Youn's is a coming-of-age story that made me laugh, cry, and just overall feel. Isn't that what we all look for in a story, and, I suppose, life in general?
Asiaelle More than 1 year ago
Junot Diaz never ceases to wow me. Seeing more of Yunior in this book and Rafa. A must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was initially put off by the narcissistic, womanizing protagonist, but soon the interconnecting stories became more intriguing and the reader comes to understand why Yunior acts the way he does. Diaz deserves his many accolades.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although for an English audience this may be a little challenging because of the use of Dominican slang the overall concept is there. This book does not necessarily have your average plot of a developing story but rather a string of little novels that explain how Yunior was able to lose every female companion. Agreed it is probably not as adhesive as we are used to because there is not defined beginning, middle and end but that is what gives this book its character. Yes the book could come of as racist, but you have to see it from the point of view of the character and not the author. He came from another country and being raised by a father who was nothing less than ignorant then yes those views will most definitely embody the person Yunior turns out to be. But the gritty parts of the book: the romance or maybe lack thereof and the sex because there was no love making, were nothing but excellent depictions of what a lot of people frequently experience. Junot did an excellent job of letting us into this character's world and slowly revealing to us why Yunior turned out the way he did.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LOVE THIS BOOK! I have read the book "Drown" in my english class and liked it so much that I ordered this one. I found this to be even better. Im shocked that some people have given it one star. I guess people get upset by the bad language and such but the shock factor is one of the things that make it so great! Now I am waiting for "The brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" to come in the mail!
FrancescaFB More than 1 year ago
Diaz, a very gifted writer, gave me a disappointing storyline. I could not bond to any of the characters, I did not care about them nor have any empathy for their lives.
BookWorm221 More than 1 year ago
This is my first Junot Diaz book and it won’t be the last, I absolutely loved the story, from the moment I started I found myself completely invested in the characters and everything around them. Junot vision of the story is a very realistic one, it is not embellished with unnecessary beautiful moments, this story is what it is and the characters are very flawed just like in real life, he made me feel not a spectator but a participant in the story. The way he describes the lives of people who go to the US searching for a better and different life that what they had back home is just honest and raw, I’ve never been in s situation like that but he made me feel a part of it, he made me feel pride to be a latina and he also made me realize how hard it is for people to adjust to a new life, we see it with Yunior’s mother, how she doesn’t talk English, how she wants good Dominican girls for her sons, how she is sad at the beginning to find herself in such a different world. It also made me see all these divisions between the Latino community, and how even within the community there are still sort of rules about who you hang out with or form a relationship with and how there are a lot of stereotypes that we ourselves perpetuate without even realizing it. I really enjoyed the book, it went by too fast because the writing was beautiful, it flowed and it made me lose control of how fast I was reading.
Gemrene More than 1 year ago
This Is How You Lose Her is a collection of short stories following characters from the Dominican Republic who have immigrated to the United States. The stories are centered around relationships, love, family, and the idea of being with someone and what that means. The collection is full of manipulation, both by males and females, strife, stereotypes, and foul language. I found it eye-opening. The first story was by far my favorite. It chronicles the fall of Yunior and Magdalena’s relationship and I thought it was well constructed and well done. Díaz managed to portray the situation in such a realistic way that really reached out to me as a reader. The last story, “A Cheater’s Guide to Love”, was probably my second favorite and also the longest. Most of the stories follow or contain Yunior, but others branch off to follow different characters, all of whom are experiencing the hardships living in America brings and forming connections—both good and bad—with other Dominicans. Overall, I really enjoyed This Is How You Lose Her. It sparked my interest in Junot Díaz’s other books and gave me new perspective on a facet of hispanic (mainly Dominican) culture and society, especially within the United States. The collection of stories is not beautiful in a happy way; it’s actually kind of a downer filled with tragedy, repeated mistakes, misery, and heartbreak. While some of the stories were dull, I thought the entire collection as a whole was cohesive and illustrious, and I recommend giving it a shot if the premise interests you. I’m glad I did.
Gemrene More than 1 year ago
This Is How You Lose Her is a collection of short stories following characters from the Dominican Republic who have immigrated to the United States. The stories are centered around relationships, love, family, and the idea of being with someone and what that means. The collection is full of manipulation, both by males and females, strife, stereotypes, and foul language. I found it eye-opening. The first story was by far my favorite. It chronicles the fall of Yunior and Magdalena’s relationship and I thought it was well constructed and well done. Díaz managed to portray the situation in such a realistic way that really reached out to me as a reader. The last story, “A Cheater’s Guide to Love”, was probably my second favorite and also the longest. Most of the stories follow or contain Yunior, but others branch off to follow different characters, all of whom are experiencing the hardships living in America brings and forming connections—both good and bad—with other Dominicans. Overall, I really enjoyed This Is How You Lose Her. It sparked my interest in Junot Díaz’s other books and gave me new perspective on a facet of hispanic (mainly Dominican) culture and society, especially within the United States. The collection of stories is not beautiful in a happy way; it’s actually kind of a downer filled with tragedy, repeated mistakes, misery, and heartbreak. While some of the stories were dull, I thought the entire collection as a whole was cohesive and illustrious, and I recommend giving it a shot if the premise interests you. I’m glad I did.
Al_Necro More than 1 year ago
Junot Diaz was a new name to me when I discovered his enticing collection of short stories, This Is How You Lose Her. I immediately thought that the stories would have been heartbreaking based on the title, but don't think for a minute that failed relationships is all there is to this book. This Is How You Lose Her was vastly entertaining, and I was really intrigued with Junot Diaz' colorful, poetic but confident prose. The first story, The Sun, The Moon, The Stars, immediately drew me in, and Diaz doesn't disappoint in this collection. One by one, the stories enthralled, sending me rolling on the floor laughing while feeling deeply empathic for the characters at the same time. The best story on here is 'The Cheater's Guide to Love," if you had to pick a favorite. Diaz doesn't imbue an egocentric literary elitism on this collection. He tells it in a way that modern folks can relate to, without sounding rambling colloquial at the same time. he paints vivid portraits, and his efforts at brisk but colorful characterization are effective. You get to know these characters in the short time you spend reading about them, and are unsurprisingly drawn into a world outside of your own for the duration of this book. The story, "Ms. Lora," was such an eye-opener. It was juicy without sounding gimmicky-erotic. Latino popular culture has never seen a better narrator. Honestly. Literature should be both fun and entertaining and never more have I been so overwhelmingly won over with such a potent combination. So, take a trip to Yunior's world back and forth from Santo Domingo to New York City to Boston, Massachusetts. I am now a huge admirer of Diaz' work and being a short story lover, I can't wait til he puts together another entertaining collection. Superb!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the second collection of short fiction that I've read by Junot Diaz. Here Diaz explores various types of love (physical and romantic) through his protagonist Yunior. The writing is playful, fast paced, and full of references to popular culture. If your life is marked by being in and out of love, this collection could be a companion for your journey. Also recommended: "Jenna's Flaw"
MarlaneAR More than 1 year ago
I personally enjoyed this book. His humor made me laugh at times and it was really engaging. (I finished it in less than 24 hours) I also felt like I related to it, since I am of Hispanic origin. I would recommend this book to anyone. It's really an easy read.
Literary_Marie More than 1 year ago
Love fades. Love is passionate. Love is obsessive. Love is reckless. Pulitzer Prize-winner Junot Diaz pens a collection of short stories with a central theme: irresistible love. At the heart of every story is Yunior. Through his memories, readers get a glimpse of his experiences with women. My major gripe is that the series of short stories are not in chronological order. At times, it made the book hard to follow, causing me to pause and figure out when exactly the particular events occurred. Was this relationship before this one? Did he date this girl before or after the last girl? Despite this minor annoyance, Diaz's prose flows into a collection of stories with love at the center. Some of the love affairs fail; some are unresolved. Such is life. However, the author successfully showed that Yunior learned a lesson from every relationship and led him to ultimately realize how he lost her. For readers that are sticklers for organized chapters, this book may be hard for you to get into. But stick with it; This is How You Lose Her is worth reading. It may spark memories of your own past relationships and will make for good book club discussions. Literary Marie of Precision Reviews
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KatrinaO More than 1 year ago
Realistic and heart-breaking; a must read for everyone who has been, is currently into AND PLANNING into going through the relationship CHEATING. Haha. “A cheater’s guide to love.”
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BlkGrlwithLibrary More than 1 year ago
After reading "the Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao" I found myself hungry for other stories by this writer. This book was hardly disappointing and a quick, yet entertaining read. I absolutely adore the way Díaz gets right into the story weaving English and Spanish in a way you forget you are reading. Yet alone, reading in another language. 'This is How You Lose Her' makes you think about the relationships you have had and lost for whatever reasons, and how the really good ones you never really get over.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pura Principle is FUNNY chapter. It's not a great book but it's funny and interesting but make sure you speak spanish or hang out with dominicans. Just for the lingo.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Suitable entertaining, quick read.