This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!--in America's Gilded Capital

This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!--in America's Gilded Capital

by Mark Leibovich
3.8 71

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Overview

This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral--Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!--in America's Gilded Capital by Mark Leibovich

 One of the nation’s most acclaimed journalists, The New York Times’s Mark Leibovich, presents a blistering, penetrating, jaw-dropping—and often hysterical—look at Washington’s incestuous “media industrial complex.”
 
The great thing about Washington is no matter how many elections you lose, how many times you’re indicted, how many scandals you’ve been tainted by, well, the great thing is you can always eat lunch in that town again. What keeps the permanent government spinning on its carousel is the freedom of shamelessness, and that mother’s milk of politics, cash.

In Mark Leibovich’s remarkable look at the way things really work in D.C., a funeral for a beloved television star becomes the perfect networking platform, a disgraced political aide can emerge with more power than his boss, campaign losers befriend their vanquishers (and make more money than ever!), “conflict of interest” is a term lost in translation, political reporters are fetishized and worshipped for their ability to get one’s name in print, and, well—we’re all really friends, aren’t we?

What Julia Phillips did for Hollywood, Timothy Crouse did for journalists, and Michael Lewis did for Wall Street, Mark Leibovich does for our nation’s capital.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780399161308
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 07/16/2013
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 438,842
Product dimensions: 6.40(w) x 9.14(h) x 1.30(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mark Leibovich is a political feature correspondent for The New York Times, based in Washington, D.C., and author of The New Imperialists. In 2011, he received a National Magazine Award for his cover story in the The New York Times Magazine on Politico's Mike Allen. Prior to coming to the Times, Leibovich wrote for The Washington Post and The Boston Phoenix. He lives with his family in Washington

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This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral - Plus Plenty of Valet Parking! - in America's Gilded Capital 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 71 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've lived in Washington for over 40 years & am more than a little amused that so many are caught up in the small (and often petty) world that's described in this book. It's a wonderful place to live, & many of us lead productive, fulfilling lives apart from the glitter & power struggles. Still, Mr, Leibovitz has woven a fascinating tale, a guilty summer reading pleasure. It's extremely well written & proves yet again that truth is stranger than fiction. I don't think anyone could make this s**t up! -- catwak
Jamie6 More than 1 year ago
This Town is a crazy good book. The writing is crisp and easy to follow. The characters are well developed. The plot is at times laugh-out-loud funny.
Lawrence_Von_Frederick More than 1 year ago
The miasma in Washington goes much deeper than just ideology and partisanship. In this insider type account, Leibovich details a system that enriches the players while helping to paralyze government. The enticements work for members of both parties and nearly all ideologies. Thus few resist the temptation to cash in on their Congressional service after they leave Congress. Sadly, it also displays how the Obama administration, contrary to its initial intentions and values, finally joined the game. In fairness to Obama it would be difficult to stay out of the game given the high finance of our politics and 24/7 campaigns, both for running for office and for policies pending and even established. Obama would have needed extraordinary political skills which he appears to lack; and even seems to not like to play "real politics." The book demonstrates that the national government is now an industry and one that has fascinating characters whose actions just don't help the country. A must read for anyone wanting to understand why Washington is so dysfunctional.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mark Leibovich has a really entertaining story here.  It has some of the juicy political drama that one who follows politics in America would expect to hear.  His writing style is very straight and easy to read, and he really does add some witty one-liners into the piece.  The stories each have their own unique features, characters, and settings.  He describes characters so smoothly, and I feel as though I have personally known some of those people for years after reading just one paragraph about them.  Mark also adds his two cents in every now and then in the form of a sentimental story or lesson learned.  These are truly the diamonds in the rough of this piece.  He learned a ton while covering this city, and it shows in this writing.  Initially I did really want to read this book, but I am very satisfied with my reversal on this book.  It is a worthy read from a good author.  It easily earns 4 stars in this rating, but lacks the perfection necessary for a 5th.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too Many Pages About Cheesy, Self-Absorbed People About halfway through this book, which started auspiciously, I became bored. Unless you live or work in "that" town, or you are a politicoholic, you will probably find that superlawyers and super hostesses aren't  really all that fascinating - or important. Move on. Nothing to see here except vanity and greed, including the author.  
B-loNY More than 1 year ago
This was a good book. Well written from a man who knows Washington.
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ScottBell More than 1 year ago
Fascinating look at DC.
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Walks in.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Leibovich is clearly a good writer and seasoned reporter, but he was seasoned in the same pot as the people he critcizes, In one sense he has written a book that is new and interesting for its focus, but it is also a sad reflection on an auhor who seems to be every bit as insecure and enamored with his proximity to power as those he snarkily derrides, He comes off a bit like Exhibit A, Too bad because the aim of the book is good
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I enjoyed this book very much. Highly recommend it if you are interested in politics.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I didn't find this to be a great book, but held my interest. It essentially confirmed what I suspected about the decline in respect felt for our elected representatives; overall they are disgusting. Many describe it as a humorous book, but I didn't laugh once.