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Those Glamorous Gabors: Bombshells from Budapest
     

Those Glamorous Gabors: Bombshells from Budapest

2.5 2
by Darwin Porter
 

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Born in Central Europe during the twilight of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, three “vonderful vimmen”—Zsa Zsa, Eva, and Magda Gabor—transferred their glittery dreams and gold-digging ambitions to Hollywood. They supplemented America’s most Imperial Age with “guts, glamour, and goulash,” and reigned there as the Hungarian

Overview

Born in Central Europe during the twilight of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, three “vonderful vimmen”—Zsa Zsa, Eva, and Magda Gabor—transferred their glittery dreams and gold-digging ambitions to Hollywood. They supplemented America’s most Imperial Age with “guts, glamour, and goulash,” and reigned there as the Hungarian equivalents of Helen of Troy, Madame du Barry, and Madame de Pompadour.

More effectively than any army, these Bombshells from Budapest conquered kings, dukes, and princes, always with a special passion for millionaires, as they amassed fortunes, broke hearts, and amused sophisticated voyeurs on two continents. With their wit, charm, and beauty, thanks to training inspired by the glittering traditions of the Imperial Habsburgs, they became famous for being famous.

“We sold the New World high-priced goods from the Old World that it didn’t need, but bought anyway,” Zsa Zsa said.

In time, they would collectively entrap some 20 husbands and seduce perhaps 500 other men as well, many plucked directly from the pages of Who’s Who in the World.

At long last, Blood Moon lifts the “mink-and-diamond” curtain on this amazing trio of blood-related sisters, whose complicated intrigues have never been fully explored before.

Orson Welles asserted, “The world will never see the likes of the Gabor sisters again. From the villas of Cannes to the mansions of Bel Air, they were the centerpiece of countless boudoirs. They were also the most notorious mantraps since Eve. I can personally vouch for that.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781936003358
Publisher:
Blood Moon Productions
Publication date:
07/30/2013
Pages:
750
Sales rank:
1,301,718
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.90(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

HUNGARIAN RHAPSODIES: Celebrity biographer Darwin Porter, a former entertainment columnist for The Miami Herald, has been fascinated by the Gabor's "new Hungarian dynasty" since he first began entertaining Jolie Gabor, the family's savvy matriarch, at his home in New York City in collaboration with the publication of one of her cookbooks. Since then, his interest in the Budapest Bombshells (aka the Man-Eating Magyars) has carried him into the salons, some of them in Austria and Hungary, of dozens of eyewitnesses, each eager to share their insights into the tricks and techniques of some of the greatest courtesans of the 20th century.

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Those Glamorous Gabors: Bombshells from Budapest 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Reader_Grl More than 1 year ago
Awful. I'm sure some of the things in this book are factual; however, the imagined conversations are deplorable. On the back of the book: Blue Moon: Applying the tabloid standards of today to the courtesans of America's imperial past. As the tabloids have no standards, reader beware.
MistyWilliams More than 1 year ago
I don't know how much of the conversations or details are true, I assumed this book was a true non-fiction until I read the other review saying most of it is imagined. On the other hand, I found the book hard to put down, and I consider myself reasonably intelligent. It is full of stories about Hollywood life, involving the Gabors of course, but they seem to be everywhere in Hollywood. I admit I am quite amazed about the quantity of sexual activity that took place, if the book can be believed. It's amazing so few of those written about actually died of an STD. I feel the book is very entertaining. My only criticism is that there are not many larger photos of the Gabors - they are given a smallish square photo at the beginning of each section and that's all. There are a lot of photos (one each) of other people mentioned in the book, so the book is full of photos.