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Thoughts Are Things
     

Thoughts Are Things

3.2 20
by Prentice Mulford
 

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Prentice Mulford was instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

Mulford was born in Sag Harbor, New York and, in 1856, sailed to California where he would spend the next

Overview

Prentice Mulford was instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

Mulford was born in Sag Harbor, New York and, in 1856, sailed to California where he would spend the next 16 years. During this time, Mulford spent several years in mining towns, trying to find his fortune in gold, copper, or silver. After leaving the mining life, Mulford ran for a position on the California State Assembly in Sacramento. Although he was nominated, he ultimately lost the election. He returned to San Francisco and began writing for a weekly newspaper, The Golden Era. Mulford spent five years as a writer and editor for various papers and was named by many San Franciscans a "Bohemian," for his disregard for money. Mulford states in his autobiography, "poverty argued for us possession of more brains" (Prentice Mulford's Story 130). He became known for his humorous style of writing and vivid descriptions of both mining life as well as life at sea. In 1872, Mulford returned to New York City, where he became known as a comic lecturer, author of poems and essays, and a columnist for [The New York Daily Graphic] from 1875-1881. Mulford was also instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781599866024
Publisher:
Filiquarian Publishing
Publication date:
12/16/2007
Pages:
180
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.38(d)

Meet the Author

Prentice Mulford (5 April 1834 - 27 May 1891) was a noted literary humorist and California author. In addition, he helped found the New Thought movement. He also coined the term Law of Attraction.

Mulford was born in Sag Harbor, New York and, in 1856, sailed to California where he would spend the next 16 years. During this time, Mulford spent several years in mining towns, trying to find his fortune in gold, copper, or silver. After leaving the mining life, Mulford ran for a position on the California State Assembly in Sacramento. Although he was nominated, he ultimately lost the election. He returned to San Francisco and began writing for a weekly newspaper, The Golden Era. Mulford spent five years as a writer and editor for various papers and was named by many San Franciscans a "Bohemian," for his disregard for money. Mulford states in his autobiography, "poverty argued for us possession of more brains" (Prentice Mulford's Story 130). He became known for his humorous style of writing and vivid descriptions of both mining life as well as life at sea. In 1872, Mulford returned to New York City, where he became known as a comic lecturer, author of poems and essays, and a columnist for [The New York Daily Graphic] from 1875-1881. Mulford was also instrumental in the founding of the popular philosophy, New Thought, along with other notable writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson. Mulford's book, Thoughts are Things served as a guide to this new belief system and is still popular today.

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Thoughts Are Things (Barnes & Noble Edition) 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Killer_7001 More than 1 year ago
Someone goofed and the publishers put the book out into the market anyway. It's kind of like going to a restaurant and the waitress knows that your order is messed up, but she brings it to you anyway hoping that you won't notice the errors. However, once you hack through many of the typos, what you have left is some valuable information that will remain inert unless put into practice. I disagree with the author on many points and agree with many as well. There are some nuggets of information that I know will help me with my daily thinking and thought process. It's a short book--less than 130 pages and can be read in less than a week.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The previous reviewer mentioned the many typographical errors. All I can imagine is that they have never run into British Spelling before. There are no typos unless you consider British spelling to be an error. Wonderful book.
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pompernickel More than 1 year ago
good book highly recommended .
gordonknight More than 1 year ago
wishful thinking posing as scientific method. very skillful weaving of unrelated and weak data into a fabric that cannot be turned to any useful purpose. worse, she could be right.
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