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Three French Hens
     

Three French Hens

4.3 3
by Margie Palatini, Richard Egielski (Illustrator)
 
On the third day of Christmas, a mademoiselle from Paris sent her true love three French hens, two turtle doves, and a partridge in a pear tree.The hens never arrived . . . . Colette, Poulette, and Fifi end up delivered not to Philippe Renard, but to Phil Fox from the Bronx. Phil can't believe his luck-he hasn't had a square meal in weeks, and here's a free lunch

Overview

On the third day of Christmas, a mademoiselle from Paris sent her true love three French hens, two turtle doves, and a partridge in a pear tree.The hens never arrived . . . . Colette, Poulette, and Fifi end up delivered not to Philippe Renard, but to Phil Fox from the Bronx. Phil can't believe his luck-he hasn't had a square meal in weeks, and here's a free lunch right on his doorstep! But his plans to dine on the delectable fowl are foiled as the French hens work their Christmas magic on him, proving that the spirit of the holidays can bring the most unlikely folks together.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Take The 12 Days of Christmas, add a soup on of French sophistication and a whiff of Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, and you've got this clever holiday farce. When three French hens sent from Paris as a gift to Philippe Renard instead wind up on the doorstep of Phil Fox in the Bronx, the fun begins. Down-on-his-luck Phil is ready to get the rotisserie roaster rolling for Poulette, Fifi and Colette until the couture-clad trio shows him an abundance of spirit (even though they are kosher hens who celebrate Hanukkah!). Egielski (Hey, Al) goes to the limit with humorous detail, right down to scented candles in the bathroom and the gals' bright, stylish footwear. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This pun- and fun-filled romp begins in Paris at Christmas time, but can be enjoyed year round. The three French hens, part of that list of gifts in the traditional Christmas carol, are sent by a mademoiselle to her "true love." Before the title page, we see them sent but learn that they never arrived. We pick up the story in the unclaimed mail department of the New York City Post Office, where the undaunted Colette, Poulette, and Fifi determine to complete their journey to "Philippe Renard," whom they think they have discovered in the telephone book as Phil Fox. In his shabby apartment, Phil at first cannot believe his luck. "Better than Chinese takeout," he says hungrily. But then as the resourceful hens coddle him, decorate, and cook him mouth-watering alternatives to eating them, all with charming French accents, Phil guiltily admits that he is not the "true love." They in turn confess that they are kosher chickens. As true friends they can celebrate both Christmas and Hanukkah together. Egielski creates detailed scenes full of emotion and characters rich with personality. Phil's place is converted by Paulette into a snazzy, freshly painted space complete with log-burning fireplace for the smoking-jacketed Phil. The hens are fashionably dressed, complete with high heels. A menorah is included in the final festive scene with the menagerie from the carol on parade, while bits of French are sprinkled throughout. 2005, Hyperion Books for Children, Ages 4 to 8.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Kirkus Reviews
Poulette, Colette and Fifi are three tres chic chickens from France who arrive in error at Phil Fox's in the Bronx rather than to Philippe Renard's in Paris. Phil is down on his luck and envisions several tasty chicken dinners, but the three French hens quickly transform him with a personal makeover, complete redecorating of his apartment and tons of fine French cuisine. Phil finds he can't possibly eat his kind new friends for dinner, so they celebrate the holidays together, both Christmas and Hanukkah, along with many of the characters from "The 12 Days of Christmas." The hilarious text is full of dramatic flair, amusing references to French culture and some inside jokes for the adults that are laugh-out-loud funny. Caldecott Medalist Egielski contributes a delightfully wily fox and hens with true Parisian panache right down to high heels, hats and purses. This clever and original tale is the sort that is read over and over during any season, quite likely becoming a family favorite in any household that enjoys quirky characters, droll humor and excellent writing. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786851676
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Publication date:
09/01/2005
Pages:
36
Product dimensions:
9.25(w) x 10.87(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
AD570L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Three French Hens 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's a fun read with the foreign accent and the play on the Twelve Days of Christmas.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a clever story---my kind of humor! The hens attire adds to the fun! You'll never sing the twelve days of Christmas quite the same again!!