×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Three Names of Me
     

Three Names of Me

by Mary Cummings, Lin Wang
 

See All Formats & Editions

Ada has three names. Wang Bin is what the caregivers called her at her Chinese orphanage. Ada is the name her American parents gave her. And there is a third name, a name the infant Ada only heard whispered by her Chinese mother.


Overview

Ada has three names. Wang Bin is what the caregivers called her at her Chinese orphanage. Ada is the name her American parents gave her. And there is a third name, a name the infant Ada only heard whispered by her Chinese mother.


Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
This sensitive treatment of foreign adoption is a story told through the eye of the adoptee. Ada was born in China and as an infant was adopted by an American family. Her family has made sure that Ada remembers her roots as she tells us about her three names: the name her birth mother called her, the name the orphanage in China called her, and the name given to her by her adoptive parents. Although she cannot remember exactly what her birth mother called her, it is definitely in her heart. The lovely illustrations provide an ethereal quality to this story of hope, happiness, and the blending of cultures. Ada goes on to provide readers with hints about keeping a journal and scrapbook as a way of remembering and expressing one's uniqueness. Some use of Chinese language and culture will give young American children an introduction to understanding.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-A gentle, sensitive story of international adoption told through the eyes of a Chinese-American girl. Ada Lorane Bennett explains how she came to have several names-the first was from her birth mother and is buried deep in her heart, another she received at the orphanage, and the third came from her adoptive parents. In telling her story, readers learn about Ada's life in America, her likes and dislikes, and a few facts about her homeland. However, it is the child's present life in the States and her love for her adoptive parents that is emphasized. A few Chinese words are introduced and explained within the context of the story. The book concludes with pages from Ada's scrapbook. Consisting of pictures and thoughts, they reveal what is important to her-family, friends, pets, as well as facts about China. The theme of family should interest most children, but adopted youngsters will relate to Ada's feelings as she considers her past as well as present circumstances. Simple, lyrical text enhances the quiet tone of the story. Soft and delicate, the realistic illustrations capture the mood of the story and reveal Ada's thoughts about who she is and where she came from. The warmth and simplicity of this story, plus the positive message on adoption, should appeal to most readers.-Margaret R. Tassia, Millersville University, PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Ada has three names. Her parents call her Ada, but that's not the only name she's been called. First, her birth mother whispered a name, one that Ada doesn't know how to say; in the Chinese orphanage, the nurses called her Wang Bin, which means gentle and refined princess; and then, when her adoptive parents came to China to pick up Wang Bin, they named her Ada. In Chinese, ai da means, "love arrived." That is to say that Ada is loved by her new parents. This sweet tale of international adoption pulls no punches when Ada considers questions about adoption. Why did Ada's birth parents leave her at the orphanage? Why do people stare at Ada when she is out with her parents? Lovely watercolor-and-colored-pencil illustrations place Ada at the center of the story and each double-paged spread, allowing the reader to connect with her. Unnecessary scrapbook pages follow the tender main story. An insightful story for adopted children and their friends who want to know more about international adoption. (Fiction. 6-10)
From the Publisher

"An insightful story for adopted children and their friends who want to know more about international adoption."

Kirkus Reviews

"A gentle, sensitive story of international adoption told through the eyes of a Chinese-American girl."

School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781497689299
Publisher:
Whitman, Albert & Company
Publication date:
10/14/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
31 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
8 - 13 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Cummings is the author of a book on the life of the Buddha and has led art tours to China, Japan, and India. She has curated Asian-themed museum exhibitions on shadow puppets, figurative art, and other topics. She is education director at a Midwestern literary center. Mary lives with her husband and Chinese-born daughter, Ada.
 
Lin Wang received her M.F.A. from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia. She uses watercolor and colored pencil to create a style she calls “ethereal realism.” A native of China, she lives with her husband, son, and daughter in California, where she freelances as an illustrator.

 

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews