Three Stations (Arkady Renko Series #7)

Three Stations (Arkady Renko Series #7)

by Martin Cruz Smith
3.2 178

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Overview

Three Stations (Arkady Renko Series #7) by Martin Cruz Smith


A passenger train hurtling through the night. An unwed teenage mother headed to Moscow to seek a new life. A cruel-hearted soldier looking furtively, forcibly, for sex. An infant disappearing without a trace.

So begins Martin Cruz Smith’s masterful Three Stations, a suspenseful, intricately constructed novel featuring Investigator Arkady Renko. For the last three decades, beginning with the trailblazing Gorky Park, Renko (and Smith) have captivated readers with detective tales set in Russia. Renko is the ironic, brilliantly observant cop who finds solutions to heinous crimes when other lawmen refuse to even acknowledge that crimes have occurred. He uses his biting humor and intuitive leaps to fight not only wrongdoers but the corrupt state apparatus as well.

In Three Stations, Renko’s skills are put to their most severe test. Though he has been technically suspended from the prosecutor’s office for once again turning up unpleasant truths, he strives to solve a last case: the death of an elegant young woman whose body is found in a construction trailer on the perimeter of Moscow’s main rail hub. It looks like a simple drug overdose to everyone—except to Renko, whose examination of the crime scene turns up some inexplicable clues, most notably an invitation to Russia’s premier charity ball, the billionaires’ Nijinksy Fair. Thus a sordid death becomes interwoven with the lifestyles of Moscow’s rich and famous, many of whom are clinging to their cash in the face of Putin’s crackdown on the very oligarchs who placed him in power.

Renko uncovers a web of death, money, madness and a kidnapping that threatens the woman he is coming to love and the lives of children he is desperate to protect. In Three Stations, Smith produces a complex and haunting vision of an emergent Russia’s secret underclass of street urchins, greedy thugs and a bureaucracy still paralyzed by power and fear.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780330444941
Publisher: Pan Books Limited
Publication date: 06/28/2011
Series: Arkady Renko Series , #7

About the Author

Martin Cruz Smith’s novels include Gorky Park, Stallion Gate, Polar Star, Stalin’s Ghost, Rose, December 6, Tatiana, and The Girl from Venice. He is a two-time winner of the Hammett Prize, a recipient of Britain’s Golden Dagger Award, and a winner of the Premio Piemonte Giallo Internazionale. He lives in California.

Ron McLarty has appeared on Broadway in That Championship Season, Our Country's Good, and Moonchildren. His film credits include Two Bits, The Postman, and The Flamingo Kid. He has starred on television in Spenser for Hire and Cop Rock. Mr. McLarty is also a novelist and an award-winning playwright.

Hometown:

San Rafael, California

Date of Birth:

November 3, 1942

Place of Birth:

Reading, Pennsylvania

Education:

B.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1964

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Three Stations (Arkady Renko Series #7) 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 178 reviews.
Sean_From_OHIO More than 1 year ago
Without a any hyperbole, I can honestly say I love Martin Cruz Smith. His writing style is so different than every other cookie cutter mystery writer out there. His characters all seem reasonable and distinct. I have never been anywhere remotely close to Russia but Smith makes it so easy to see. I feel like I've been there. Renko is classically sarcastic without even trying and a great hero without any reason to be. My only qualm with this novel is that the other Renko novels seemed to spend more time with the red herrings and here there were only a handful of possible killers. I still really enjoyed it!
DaleGPS More than 1 year ago
I have anticipated each new book from Cruz-Smith until now. Unlike some of his other books, this one seems as if it was written purely to capitalize on the author's name. People wander in and out of the story and have no real relation to the plot. They are put there to add pages to the book which is already only about 200 pages long. Then at the end of the book, the author says "times up" and just wraps up the story. There is no evolving to the conclusion. He just writes a terse ending. Save your money and hope Martin Cruz Smith returns to serious writing. His earlier books were well worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yikes. Disjointed characters, unresolved plot lines, abrupt conclusions, random prose... Not what i came to expect from the Renko series.
AH54 More than 1 year ago
It was basically a waste of money to buy this for my Nook. The beginning of the story sets the hook, but then it is as if the author lost interest. At about the same time, the reader does also. Characters wander in, are introduced, and then vanish. For the first time in a Renko novel, the plot seems forced as if the author forgot how to integrate the characters and plot. The book is essentially a ghost of Gorky Park, Polar Star, Red Square, and Havana Bay. Save your money and re-read the other novels in the series, which are much more complicated and engaging.
glauver More than 1 year ago
Martin Cruz Smith has been writing about Arkady Renko off and on for more than 30 years. The seventh book in the series was a real disappointment to me. If Smith had stuck with the original premise, a teenage mother trying to find her stolen baby, this might have been a gripping book. I envisioned an exploration of rich Americans adopting Russian children for big money. Instead, we go to subplots involving millionaires, serial killers, mob hit men, street urchins, and Renko's corrupt superiors. To top it off, Arkady goes from hapless bozo to being a James Bond superman in the space of a few pages. It's all much too much in a little more than 230 pages.
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