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Overview

Leading media scholars consider the social and cultural changes that come with the contemporary development of ubiquitous computing.

Ubiquitous computing and our cultural life promise to become completely interwoven: technical currents feed into our screen culture of digital television, video, home computers, movies, and high-resolution advertising displays. Technology has become at once larger and smaller, mobile and ambient. In Throughout , leading writers on new media—including Jay David Bolter, Mark Hansen, N. Katherine Hayles, and Lev Manovich—take on the crucial challenges that ubiquitous and pervasive computing pose for cultural theory and criticism.

The thirty-four contributing researchers consider the visual sense and sensations of living with a ubicomp culture; electronic sounds from the uncanny to the unremarkable; the effects of ubicomp on communication, including mobility, transmateriality, and infinite availability; general trends and concrete specificities of interaction designs; the affectivity in ubicomp experiences, including performances; context awareness; and claims on the “real” in the use of such terms as “augmented reality” and “mixed reality. ”

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262017503
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 11/02/2012
Series: The MIT Press
Pages: 664
Product dimensions: 9.00(w) x 7.20(h) x 1.60(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Ulrik Ekman is Associate Professor in the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies at the University of Copenhagen. He is the organizer of the research network The Culture of Ubiquitous Information.

Jay David Bolter is Wesley Chair of New Media and Codirector of the Augmented Media Lab at Georgia Institute of Technology. He is the author of Remediation: Understanding New Media (with Richard Grusin), Windows and Mirrors: Interaction Design, Digital Art and the Myth of Transparency (with Diane Gromala), both published by the MIT Press, and other books.

Mark B. N. Hansen is Professor of Literature at Duke University.

N. Katherine Hayles is Professor of English and Design/Media Arts at the University of California at Los Angeles.

Larissa Hjorth, an artist ethnographer, is Professor in the School of Media and Communication at Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT).

John Johnston is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Emory University in Atlanta. He is the author of Carnival of Repetition and Information Multiplicity. Susan Kozel is Professor of New Media at the School of Art and Culture, Malmö University, Sweden.

Timothy LENOIR is the Kimberly Jenkins Chair for New Technologies and Society at Duke University. He has published several books and articles on the history of biomedical science from the nineteenth century to the present, and is currently engaged in an investigation of the introduction of computers into biomedical research from the early 1960s to the present.

Lev Manovich is Professor of Visual Arts, University of California, San Diego. His book The Language of New Media (MIT Press, 2001) has been hailed as "the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan. "Malcolm McCullough is Professor of Architecture at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Abstracting Craft: The Practiced Digital Hand , Digital Ground: Architecture , Pervasive Computing, and Environmental Knowing , and Ambient Commons: Attention in the Age of Embodied Information , all published by the MIT Press.

Michael Nitsche is Assistant Professor at the School of Literature, Communication, and Culture at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Dietmar Offenhuber is Assistant Professor in the Departments of Art + Design and Public Policy at Northeastern University, where he heads the Information Design and Visualization graduate program.

Christiane PAUL is Adjunct Curator of New Media Arts at the Whitney Museum of American Art and Director of Intelligent Agent, a service organization dedicated to digital art. She has written extensively on new media arts and her book Digital Art was published in 2003.

Simon Penny is Professor of Art at the Claire Trevor School of the Arts at the University of California, Irvine, teaching mechatronic art, media art history and theory, and interdisciplinary seminars interfacing contemporary cognitive science and philosophy of mind with the arts. Trained as a sculptor, he has spent much of his career building interactive art environments with custom robotic and sensor-based systems.

Roberto Simanowski is a scholar of media and cultural studies and the author of Digital Art and Meaning , Data Love , Facebook Societ y, Waste: A New Media Primer , and The Death Algorithm and Other Digital Dilemmas (the last two published by the MIT Press).

Kristin Veel is Associate Professor at the Department for Arts and Cultural Studies at the University of Copenhagen.

Bernadette Wegenstein is Research Professor in the Department of German and Romance Languages and Literatures at Johns Hopkins University, where she also directs the Center for Advanced Media Studies. The author of Getting Under the Skin: Body and Media Theory (MIT Press, 2006), she is also a documentary filmmaker.

Mitchell Whitelaw is Lecturer in New Media at the School of Creative Communication, University of Canberra.

Matthew Fuller is Professor of Cultural Studies at the Digital Culture Unit, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of Media Ecologies: Materialist Energies in Art and Technoculture (MIT Press), Software Studies (MIT Press), and, with Andrew Goffey, of Evil Media (MIT Press) as well as Behind the Blip: Essays on the Culture of Software and other books.

Table of Contents

Foreword Matthew Fuller xi

Acknowledgments xxxiii

Introduction Ulrik Ekman 1

I Sense and Sensations 1: Image 61

1 Ubiquitous Sensation: Toward an Atmospheric, Collective, and Microtemporal Model of Media Mark B. N. Hansen 63

2 The Ubiquity of Photography Arild Fetveit 89

3 The Family Photo Album as Transformed Social Space in the Age of "Web 2.0" Mette Sandbye 103

4 Calm Imaging: The Conquest of Overload and the Conditions of Attention Kristin Veel 119

II Sense and Sensations 2: Sound 133

5 Losing Your Voice: Sampled Speech and Song from the Uncanny to the Unremarkable Joseph Auner 135

6 The End of Flânerie: iPods, Aesthetics, and Urban Experience Michael Bull 151

7 Virtual Space and Atmosphere in Electronic Music Torben Sangild 163

8 Ambience and Ubiquity Ulrik Schmidt 175

III Communications 189

9 Text as Event: Calm Technology and Invisible Information as Subject of Digital Arts Roberto Simanowski 191

10 The Novelty of Being Mobile: A Case Study of Mobile Novels and the Politics of the Personal Larissa Hjorth 205

11 Transmateriality: Presence Aesthetics and the Media Arts Mitchell Whitelaw 223

12 Infinite Availability-about Hypercommunication (and Old Age) Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht 237

IV Interaction Designs 247

13 Reflections on the Philosophy of Pervasive Gaming-with Special Emphasis on Rules, Gameplay, and Virtuality Bo Kampmann Walther 249

14 Trying to Be Calm: Ubiquity, Cognitivism, and Embodiment Simon Penny 263

15 Of Intangible Speed: "Ubiquity" as Transduction in Interactivity Ulrik Ekman 279

16 Interaction as a Designed Experience Lev Manovich 311

V Being Moved Live 321

17 Liveness, Presence, and Performance in Contemporary Digital Media Jay David Bolter Blair Maclntyre Michael Nitsche Kathryn Farley 323

18 Sinews of Ubiquity: A Corporeal Ethics for Ubiquitous Computing Susan Kozel 337

19 Affective Politics in Urban Computing and Locative Media Anne Galloway 351

20 Machinic Sutures: From Eighteenth-Century Physiognomy to Twenty-First-Century Makeover Bernadette Wegenstein 365

VI Context Awareness 383

21 Feeding the Serpent Its Own Tail: Counterforces to Tactile Enclosure in the Age of Transparency Inke Arns 385

22 Contexts as Moving Targets: Locative Media Art and the Shifting Ground of Context Awareness Christiane Paul 399

23 Intimacy and Self-Organization in Hybrid Public Spheres Söke Dinkla 419

24 Kuleshov's Display-on Contextual Invisibility Dietmar Offenhuber 431

25 Inscribing the Ambient Commons Malcolm McCullough 443

VII Mixed Reality 455

26 The Space of Bodily Presence and Space as a Medium of Representation Gernot Böhme 457

27 Toward a (Re)Constructed Endosemiotics? Art, Magic, and Augmented Reality Jacob Wamberg 465

28 Teleologies of the Snail, or the Errancies of the Equipped Self in a WiMax Network Bernard Stiegler 479

29 The Indexing of Things Bernard Stiegler 493

30 Radio-Frequency Identification: Human Agency and Meaning in Information-Intensive Environments N. Katherine Hayles 503

31 The Philotechnic Blind: Ubiquity, Relapse, Mutation (Notes on Bernard Stiegler's "Nanomutation") Tom Cohen 529

32 Digital Gaia John Johnston 549

33 Contemplating Singularity Timothy Lenoir 563

Contributors 587

Index 597

What People are Saying About This

Adam Greenfield

Chock-full of timely meditations on what it is to be a body and an embodied self in an age of ubiquitous technical mediation, Throughout is the richest sort of lode. You'll nod, you'll jot down thoughts, you'll think of exceptions and argue back in the margins. A resoundingly useful resource.

Jonathan Dovey

This ground breaking collection is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the relationship between technology and culture in the next twenty years. The rich mix of approaches begins to define a field for understanding the world of pervasive media that is emerging out of ubiquitous computing.

Endorsement

This ground breaking collection is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the relationship between technology and culture in the next twenty years. The rich mix of approaches begins to define a field for understanding the world of pervasive media that is emerging out of ubiquitous computing.

Jonathan Dovey, Professor, Digital Cultures Research Centre, University of the West of England

From the Publisher

Chock-full of timely meditations on what it is to be a body and an embodied self in an age of ubiquitous technical mediation, Throughout is the richest sort of lode. You'll nod, you'll jot down thoughts, you'll think of exceptions and argue back in the margins. A resoundingly useful resource.

Adam Greenfield , Managing Director, Urbanscale

This ground breaking collection is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the relationship between technology and culture in the next twenty years. The rich mix of approaches begins to define a field for understanding the world of pervasive media that is emerging out of ubiquitous computing.

Jonathan Dovey , Professor, Digital Cultures Research Centre, University of the West of England

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