The Tiger Warrior

The Tiger Warrior

by David Gibbins
3.5 35

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Tiger Warrior 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
JDubWB More than 1 year ago
The cover of this novel by David Gibbons has an unattributed quote which says "What do you get if you cross Indiana Jones with Dan Brown? Answer: David Gibbins." This book is as intricate as Brown tries to be with even less success. It is convoluted and the main character is less Indiana Jones and more boring Jones. This book is page turner escapism. The dialogue is so dull that you turn the page just to escape the excruciating monologues meant to provide the meat and back-ground. The premise--a "what-if" Roman legionaires traveled across Asia 2000 years ago and encountered the various cultures along their quest to return to Rome--could be incredibly interesting. The writer tries to incorporate Rome, India, China, Afghanistan along with the Taliban. Except there is no flavor, just tedium. If I wanted an anthropoligical description of Asia 2000 years ago, I would be better off reading Conn Iggulden's series on Genghis Khan. If I wanted a complex plot, with outstanding characterization followed by intense action I would far prefer to read something by Stephen Hunter. All in all, this was a waste of $8. Too bad, because when I like a writer, I tend to buy and read all of his or her works.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Having read David Gibbins first three novels, I thought that I would enjoy his fourth work as much. Was I mistaken! It was reminiscent of being back in a college auditorium listening to an ancient professor ramble on about ancient history, wondering when he would cut to the chase. This was the same thing that I was waiting for Mr. Gibbins to do. I resolved myself to finish the book, all 483 pages, hoping that the next chapter would keep me from falling asleep. No chance! The few morsels of action weren't enough to keep me plodding through his "diversions" into the history lessons and I too longed to be in Hawaii long before I read the last page. Mr. Gibbins first three novels, Atlantis, Crusader Gold and The Lost Tomb, were page turning homeruns, which I recommend reading. The Tiger Warrior is not!
ChrisinGVille More than 1 year ago
This is one of those books where one reads the jacket and gets taken in by the premise only to find out that it's dull as dirt! The first 100 pages are possibly the most tedious text that I've struggled through... Clive Cussler is no Ernest Hemingway but Gibbens makes him seem comparable! A very shallow, transparent take off on Pitt and Giordano... The "Giordano" character, Costas, serves as the dumb guy to whom every dull and tedious detail need be explained so the rest of us readers have a remote clue as to what the egg-heads are talking about! Sorry, but I just could not grasp the significance of the "Roman-Silk Route-China" connection. In the first 100-150 pages, I must have exclaimed out loud "So what? Who cares?" literally 50 times. And the technique of having the main characters over-react to some arcane discovery that is purported to be of monumental significance to the history of mankind would be laughable if it wasn't so excruciatingly boring! "Jack reacted as if he'd been physically struck... The Periplus of the Erythraean Sea! It can't be!" Huh? Zzzzzzzzzz.....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The stories have all been fabulous, and the writing has become more compact and easily read, the characters are better developed, which makes each book better than the last
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ProfesorPaco More than 1 year ago
Gibbins' attempt to inject a convoluted and complicated plot into a readable novel falls way short of the mark! Unless, of course, one is interested in some sort of historical vingette of that genre, then fine. I found it very difficult in getting "into the book," much more than usual, maybe because I did not find the theme to my liking or because the author expends much to much energy trying to convey some sort of mythical/historical background. Sadly, I did not finish the bood because it just did not "grab me" like other novels have.