Tokyo Heist

Tokyo Heist

by Diana Renn
4.4 12

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Overview

Tokyo Heist by Diana Renn

The perfect mystery for fans of Ally Carter's Heist Society

When sixteen-year-old Violet agrees to spend the summer with her father, an up-and-coming artist in Seattle, she has no idea what she's walking into. Her father's newest clients, the Yamada family, are the victims of a high-profile art robbery: van Gogh sketches have been stolen from their home, and, until they can produce the corresponding painting, everyone's lives are in danger—including Violet's and her father's.

Violet's search for the missing van Gogh takes her from the Seattle Art Museum, to the yakuza-infested streets of Tokyo, to a secluded inn in Kyoto. As the mystery thickens, Violet's not sure whom she can trust. But she knows one thing: she has to solve the mystery—before it's too late.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780670013326
Publisher: Viking Juvenile
Publication date: 06/14/2012
Pages: 384
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.32(h) x 1.22(d)
Lexile: 710L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Diana Renn grew up in Seattle and now lives in Boston. She has taught ESL and writing, most recently at Boston University. She has published numerous short stories and essays, and she is also the Fiction Editor at YARN (Young Adult Review Network), an award-winning online magazine featuring short-form writing for teens. She is the author of several ESL textbooks, as well as the YA mystery novels Latitude Zero and Tokyo Heist. She is an avid traveler.

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Tokyo Heist 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I could not even finish it. The author kept going back to manga and it made the book choppy. Also the characters were predicatable and the plot was mediocore. But for a debut the idea was not too bad.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bookworm1858 More than 1 year ago
4.5/5 stars Source: Received an ARC from Jen Ryland/YA Romantics. "A Missing van Gogh Painting A Burglarized Mansion A Ransom Note Two Japanese Gangsters on the Loose Four Destroyed Paintings An Unexplained Suicide And Two Girls who must solve the mystery, save the art, and catch the criminals." This caught my interest for being a YA relatively uninterested in romance as well as for its contemporary Japanese setting. Though there's more to the story, these statements are fairly accurate. Our main character is Violet and she adores manga, so much so that she is drawing her very own incorporating some of her real-life interests into the art. She plans to continue adding to it over the summer while staying with her father and working at a comic book store. However it seems that her father was unprepared for her arrival, not even telling his girlfriend about Violet's existence! This does not start the holiday off well but the situation picks up when Violet discovers she is going to accompany her father to Japan so he can paint a mural. She also gets to flex her detecting muscles when she learns about a missing van Gogh painting and sketches and the Japanese mobsters who are after her father's patron. Can Violet crack the case? While writing my summary above, I realized that there are so many little threads in this book (including several I didn't feel like could fit in that already stuffed synopsis). I think that one of my big enjoyments was seeing them all come together especially since they seemed so bewildering in the beginning. Of particular enjoyment to me was Violet's attempts at detection, which she incorporates into a new manga, allowing her to puzzle items out. My disappointment though was that while the drawings are described in depth, they are not included. This is a great example of how artwork could enhance a reading experience and I feel like this was a missed opportunity. As I mentioned, there are a lot of threads in this book and though most are juggled and brought in well, I would have liked a lot more about two in particular. One was Violet's relationship with her father. He hasn't been very present in her life since she lives with her mom but he also loses himself in his art even when she is around. She is able to challenge him on his disengagement but I wasn't fully satisfied. The other element was Violet's romance. For a long time, she's been in love with her best friend but is afraid to jeopardize their friendship. Consequently, when there are movements toward romance, it is not swoony and dreamy but is instead based on their solid longstanding but mostly unseen and unfelt by the reader friendship. Overall: A really fun ride through artwork, deception, and love with an exciting Tokyo/Japan backdrop. Highly recommended!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was ok but was sometimes boring
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
katarinasmama More than 1 year ago
*Review published on Mundie Moms on 7/15/2012* [...] I love heist plots. They're my absolute favorite and what I like best about reading them is the anticipation in wondering just how all the pieces of the puzzle will fall. My favorite theme in stories is anything involving families. Diana Renn combines both of those in Tokyo Heist. What I loved most about Diana's book is that it's not told from the traditional heist point-of-view (usually the people pulling off the heist), rather it's told from the character who is trying to solve the mystery of who stole the sketches. The character of Violet, the sleuthing protagonist, is downright adorable. I loved her voice and her inner determination. I also loved how her skills in drawing her graphic story, Kimono Girl, gave her a better understanding of her artist father. Her father, a single dad who is paid handsomely to create a mural for a wealthy, Japanese businessman (the very one whose Van Gogh sketches were stolen), immerses himself in his art and demands no distractions. This leaves Violet and her quirky friend, Reika, free to pursue leads on the investigation. Diana also creates believable stakes. After all, Violet and Reika are teenagers and yet, they find themselves stumbling upon and logically connecting clues that the adults investigating the crime missed or simply didn't know existed. I liked the fact that they worked hard at finding the logic thread in the mystery. I must admit that I fell for a red herring or two and when the crime was solved by Violet, I did breathe out a relieved, "HA! I knew it!" I think that's all part of the fun of second guessing this type of plot. As for art, well, the theme is handled so well. The book is carefully researched and the Author's Note in the back explains how Diana was inspired to write the history of the artwork mentioned. For those of us who love a little romance, don't worry, there's just enough of it in Tokyo Heist to make it interesting. And those moments are presented with a sweetness that still makes me smile when I remember it. If you're looking for a good mystery with a great setting (it makes me want to visit Tokyo even more), and an artistic protagonist who will not give up until the right criminal is found, you will love Tokyo Heist. This heist story is beach-bag worthy. Be sure to pick it up at your favorite bookstore or library.
emont More than 1 year ago
Suspenseful, quirky, and expertly paced, TOKYO HEIST is a sophisticated mystery with just the right amount of romance. Manga-obsessed Violet is an endearing and feisty heroine who finds herself navigating the criminal underworld of Japan on the track of a missing Van Gogh. Meanwhile, she's trying to bridge the gap between her estranged father, tame her outspoken best friend, and recapture the interest of her best friend back home. Side characters with suspicious motives abound, and I love how Vi...more Suspenseful, quirky, and expertly paced, TOKYO HEIST is a sophisticated mystery with just the right amount of romance. Manga-obsessed Violet is an endearing and feisty heroine who finds herself navigating the criminal underworld of Japan on the track of a missing Van Gogh. Meanwhile, she's trying to bridge the gap between her estranged father, tame her outspoken best friend, and recapture the interest of her best friend back home. Side characters with suspicious motives abound, and I love how Violet incorporates them all into her own manga creation, KIMONO GIRL. Violet's sarcastic yet kind narrative voice grounds the mystery in a sweet coming of age story. Highly recommended and suitable for all ages!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Violet is uncertain about spending the summer with her "emerging" artist father while her mother is in Italy. Almost 16, she is an appealing emerging artist of Japanese Manga herself. With the theft of 3 Van Gogh sketches, a summer in Seattle turns into a summer in Japan. Her father to paint a mural while she is on a mission to find the stolen sketches and a missing Van Gogh. She'll need all her ingenuity, her artistic eye for detail, and imagination to decipher the clues left by an artist 20 years ago. This fast moving, entertaining novel is a fun read for teens and adults alike.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sasha Miles Mr.Cherney English honors 12/1/14 Tokyo heist Do you enjoy mystery books with a nerdy heroine then this is the book for you, if you just enjoy mystery novels then I still recommend ‘Tokyo Heist’ by Diana Renn. Tokyo heist is about Violet Rossi, she is 16 and is in to manga, anime, and all things Japanese. So she is more than excited to go on a once in life time trip with her distant father to Japan. But before she steps foot anywhere near Japan she’s already caught up in the mystery of the missing van Gogh sketches in California. It started when she first meets the Yamadas, a nice Japanese couple who told her of their missing van Gogh and as time went on she grew more curious and got deeper in the mystery. When she finally reached Japan each clue unlocked more mysteries such as a possible suicide and a possibility of a nonexistent painting hidden somewhere in Japan. The real question is how far are you willing to go to protect your friends, family, and what’s right .Read it!
TheFloatingDesk More than 1 year ago
Diana Renn's impressive debut YA novel, "Tokyo Heist," transports heroine Violet from the comfort of her Seattle home to Tokyo's criminal underworld in a gripping, beautifully rendered mystery that engages the reader from start to finish. Renn blends artful characterization, fast-paced plotting, and acute cultural insight in a way that allows for a deep understanding of Violet's personal journey, along with broader truths about art and culture in the U.S. and Japan. In "Tokyo Heist" we witness the emergence of a major new talent in the YA genre. Violet and Reika, along with the Yamadas, will win your heart and engage your senses. Well done!