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Tomb of the Ten Thousand Dead
     

Tomb of the Ten Thousand Dead

4.0 4
by L. Ron Hubbard, R.F. Daley (Narrated by), Ralph Lister (Read by), Jim Meskimen (Read by), Joey Naber (Read by)
 

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Before Indiana Jones and the Lost Ark were even a gleam in Spielberg’s eye, one intrepid pilot flew out of the sky in search of treasure . . . only to find a bit of hell on earth.

Captain Gordon lives like he flies—by the seat of his pants, taking on any job and all comers.  Now he’s bound for the forbidding mountains along the shores of

Overview

Before Indiana Jones and the Lost Ark were even a gleam in Spielberg’s eye, one intrepid pilot flew out of the sky in search of treasure . . . only to find a bit of hell on earth.

Captain Gordon lives like he flies—by the seat of his pants, taking on any job and all comers.  Now he’s bound for the forbidding mountains along the shores of the Arabian Sea, transporting a team of anthropologists on the trail of Alexander the Great.  But ancient history is about to come to dangerous life with the discovery of a long-buried map—a map leading to high adventure, untold treasure, and cold-blooded murder. . . .

Gordon’s headed deep into The Tomb of the Ten Thousand Dead—unearthing a secret that could bury him.

Not only was Hubbard steeped in the history of the ancient world, he was also an avid adventurer—both in his own right and as a respected member of the famed Explorers Club.  As such, he brought a wealth of insight, experience and authenticity to all his tales of adventure. 

Also includes two additional adventures: The Price of a Hat, in which the key to the Russian Czar’s life is hidden in a most unexpected place, and Starch and Stripes, the story of a U.S. Marine who sets a trap for a tropical warlord that reverberates all the way back to Washington.

The title story in this trio . . . (all of them published in 1936) has a very strong Indiana Jones feel to it, even though it predates Indy by nearly five decades. —AudioFile Magazine

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The three stories reprinted in this volume are solid examples of what passed for thrilling adventures (not coincidentally the name of the pulp fiction magazine in which two of them appeared) in the pre–Indiana Jones days. In the title tale, an expedition to the Pakistan desert to locate the lost loot of Alexander the Great erupts in murder and mayhem when greed gets the better of its members. “Price of a Hat,” set in revolutionary Russia, concerns a Cossack hat that carries a secret so significant a dozen people die trying to acquire it. “Starch and Stripes” tells of a Marine officer at a Caribbean outpost whose scheme to apprehend a wily bandit is nearly undone by corps bureaucracy. Though minimally plotted and matter-of-factly narrated, all three stories have the action, violence, and derring-do that made pulp fiction the escapist entertainment of its day." —Publishers Weekly

"The title story in this trio of Hubbard's pulp fiction (all of them published in 1936) has a very strong Indiana Jones feel to it, even though it predates Indy by nearly five decades....an exciting story, told at a brisk clip, with characters and dialogue that keep readers glued to the page: Hubbard at his best."—Booklist

"...full-cast audio, beautifully rendered with cinema-quality music and sound enhancements. This exciting style of production can really bring an audiobook to life, and makes you feel like you’re right there in the middle of the action. L. Ron Hubbard does adventure stories as well as anyone I have read. Don’t miss these three thrilling tales." —Audiobook Heaven

“Hubbard’s trio offer vintage action, adventure, and romance….These full-cast productions quickly become addictive. Their brevity also makes for perfect commuter fare. Anyone who enjoys hard-boiled pulp writing or old-time radio will be rewarded.”—Library Journal

"...stories have the action, violence, and derring-do that made pulp fiction the escapist entertainment of its day.”—Publishers Weekly

“The excellent narrators, sound effects, and music will have listeners imagining themselves traveling the globe in search of adventures.”—AudioFile

“As with any well written story these stories will sweep you away and take you to these lands and leave you on the edge of your seat the whole way. This is especially true if you give the audiobooks a listen.”—Gil Wilson, Gil-T Pleasures Blog

Library Journal - AUDIO
Hubbard's trio offer vintage action, adventure, and romance. The Falcon Killer (1939), the longest of the group, follows Bill Gaylord, an American-born pilot who became known to the locals as Tzun Kai after joining the Chinese air corps to help fight the Japanese invaders. When his plane is downed, Gaylord is hidden from the enemy by American industrialist Henry Thompson and his beautiful daughter (can you say love interest?), who stand to lose it all if the Japanese prove triumphant. A spy in their midst could spell disaster, so Gaylord has to sniff him out while trying to elude capture and keep his head.Greed (1950), which also includes the short stories "Final Enemy" (1950) and "The Automagic Horse" (1949), represents Hubbard's numerous sf writings. In the distant future, man has turned to the stars to hunt for precious stones and metals, and there are billions to be made if you have the stomach for space travel and raping planets and their inhabitants of their natural resources. "Final Enemy" has a clever twist ending as Earth learns that the long-feared invader from space is man himself. "The Automagic Horse" is a humorous story of movie special effects genius Gadgett O'Dowd's mission to build a realistic fake equine for a film. When a hard-nosed studio accountant starts nickel-and-diming him, O'Dowd picks up some extra scratch racing his creation at the track.Tomb (1936), the standout of the bunch, is like a good Indiana Jones adventure. Gordon, a pilot hired to fly archaeologists on a dig, is framed for a team member's murder. He escapes but is prodded into helping the group's guide locate Alexander the Great's fortune in buried treasure. The loot is guarded by Alexander's troops, but they're long dead—or are they? This title also includes the shorts "The Price of a Hat" and "Starch and Stripes" (both 1936), offering more adventure. These full-cast productions quickly become addictive. Their brevity also makes for perfect commuter fare. Anyone who enjoys hard-boiled pulp writing or old-time radio will be rewarded.
Publishers Weekly
The three stories reprinted in this volume are solid examples of what passed for thrilling adventures (not coincidentally the name of the pulp fiction magazine in which two of them appeared) in the pre–Indiana Jones days. In the title tale, an expedition to the Pakistan desert to locate the lost loot of Alexander the Great erupts in murder and mayhem when greed gets the better of its members. “Price of a Hat,” set in revolutionary Russia, concerns a Cossack hat that carries a secret so significant a dozen people die trying to acquire it. “Starch and Stripes” tells of a Marine officer at a Caribbean outpost whose scheme to apprehend a wily bandit is nearly undone by corps bureaucracy. Though minimally plotted and matter-of-factly narrated, all three stories have the action, violence, and derring-do that made pulp fiction the escapist entertainment of its day. (Oct.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592123230
Publisher:
Galaxy Press, LLC
Publication date:
06/21/2011
Series:
Historical Fiction Short Stories Collection Series
Edition description:
First Edition, Unabridged
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 5.70(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
11 Years

Meet the Author

With 19 New York Times bestsellers and more than 230 million copies of his works in circulation, L. Ron Hubbard is among the most acclaimed and widely read authors of our time.  As a leading light of American Pulp Fiction through the 1930s and ’40s, he is further among the most influential authors of the modern age. Indeed, from Ray Bradbury to Stephen King, there is scarcely a master of imaginative tales who has not paid tribute to L. Ron Hubbard.

 

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Tomb of the Ten Thousand Dead 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
mandymarie20 More than 1 year ago
I have to say I have never read any of L. Ron Hubbard's books. Not a huge fan of sci-fi and there is that whole Scientology issue, but I have to say this was a ripping good read. I'm glad I received an Early Review copy because I had no idea what an exciting author Hubbard was. "Tomb of the Ten Thousand Dead" is an action-packed adventure ride centered on a treasure map from Alexander the Great. He left jewels in the Indian desert in a tomb which has yet to be found. Captain Charles Gordon's quest is incredibly exciting and fast paced. Loved it. The book also includes two other short stories, "Price of a Hat" and "Starch and Stripes". In "Price of a Hat", a Russian hat brings death wherever it goes, but what is the mysterious secret it hides? The fall of the Russian Monarchy takes center stage in a classic question of "What if?". I found this story utterly fascinating and a wonderful read. I'm not much of a fan of military stories so I wasn't a huge fan of "Starch and Stripes", but it was well written. On the whole, this was a great adventure read and a must for anyone who is a fan of pulps, life myself. The cover looks exciting and definitely captures the feel of the book. A wonderful glossary and section of L. Ron Hubbard's contribution to pulp literature accompanies the book. A definite keeper. I can't wait to read the rest of the series!
tomjohnson1940 More than 1 year ago
“Adventure Yarns By A Master Storyteller.” “Tomb of The Ten Thousand Dead” was published in the October 1936 issue of THRILLING ADVENTURE. Pilot Captain Gordon finds himself among crazed scientists when they discover the lost treasure of Alexander The Great. Alone in a cavern with the thousands of dead soldiers left to guard the treasure when Alexander couldn’t take it with him. All ready one man has been killed, and three more will kill to obtain the treasure. “Price of A Hat” was an interesting tale told by Stuart as a group set at a card table, the discarded cards tossed into a strange hat called a kubanka. Stuart had been assigned to spy on Russia in 1917, and in Siberia he witnesses the murder of a Mongol rider. He chases the killers off, and the Mongol tells him to carry the hat to the Czar, and then dies. Stuart loses the hat and regains it several times before having an intelligence operator examine the hat. Hidden in the seams is a coded message warning Czar Nicholas II and his family that they are to be murdered if they don’t flee to safety. The message was not delivered on time, and Czar Nicholas II and his family were murdered. “Starch & Stripes” is another yarn about marines training blacks in Africa to be soldiers. Gunnery Sergeant Eddie Edwards, wearing captain bars, is in charge of the local unit. He has set a trap for the local rebel leader, but before the trap can be sprung, Lt/Col Cramer arrives to order his men prepare for inspection. A top marine general and senators are coming for an inspection. Not having a clean uniform, Captain Edwards runs into town to have his clothes cleaned and pressed by a local black woman. Unfortunately, while in town he’s captured by the rebel leader. In an escape, he turns the tables and gets the rebel. They get to camp just in time for the inspection and the general is ready to bust him back to corporal until the senators take charge of the situation. The three stories were fun reads. I kind of liked “Price of A Hat” better than the other two, but each had their own merits. Hubbard was an excellent writer of adventure tales, as well as other genres during his pulp years. Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm a big fan of adventure heroes so this book was right up my alley. I was quickly wrapped up in Captain Gordon's big adventure. I also liked that the book included a glossary. Its the nerd in me but I having the meaning of words not used in everyday contemporary language is helpful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago