The Tombs of Atuan (Earthsea Series #2)

The Tombs of Atuan (Earthsea Series #2)

by Ursula K. Le Guin
3.9 54

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The Tombs of Atuan (Earthsea Series #2) 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 54 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a tale about a young girl named Tenar and her survival in the bleak and surturnine world of the Tombs of Atuan. However, the experinced mage named SparrowHawk/Ged goes there to try to find a lost art and to free Tenar from the groping madness of the ANCIENT ONES. I think that this has a mysterious plot because you never really know what will happen next in this story. I found this extremely satisfying and i recommend this for people 13 and over. I give this book FIVE STARS OUT OF FIVE.
extreme-reader08 More than 1 year ago
Wow, I wasn't expecting a story like this. The beginning doesn't relate at all to the previous book. I was thinking of returning it because I wasn't familiar with any of the characters. But the first book was so good, that I just continued to plow through. It was an interesting read I have to say. Not what I expected at all, which is a good thing from a critic's point of view. But to my disappointment none of the characters from the first book, except for Ged himself, make any second appearances. I was especially disappointed that Ogion didn't make a second appearance, he and Estarriol are my absolute favorites. But if your looking for an interesting read, this is the book your looking for.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. It's a beautiful love story and so much more. I read it before the Wizard of Earthsea and I think it made it even better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It starts off a little slow, but gets better when Ged comes into the story
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this book could be for 13 and up. There is some material in this book that is just a little bit violent for children such as animal and human sacrifices unfortunately. Not the best book.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This sequel to The Wizard of Earthsea took a while to get going. The first half or so almost feels like a summary of the main character's life up to the main portion of the story. The character, herself, is a little difficult to like until very near the end. Still, this second Earthsea book is just as beautifully written as the first. It feels less like a sequel and more like a seperate story in the same world with an appearence by the previous book's main character. You'll want to have read the first book before picking up this one, but you don't need to read then back-to-back like you do with a traditional fantasy series. Beautiful, just not quite as good as the first.
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K_Dawn More than 1 year ago
While this is part of the Earthsea series, it is not as good as the rest of Earthsea and does not really have the same feel. I still enjoyed it as a short and fun beach read.
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eagleck More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book. It's 4 stars just because not every book is going to be Lord of the Rings. I think this book would mean much more to girls coming into adulthood, but every fan of fantasy should read this entire trilogy.
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A rare early Le Guin book written entirely from a female point of view, this second installment of the Earthsea Cycle introduces a very different civilization. Tenar is a young priestess who was chosen from birth to serve the Nameless Ones. Ged comes looking for the ring of Erreth-Akbe and is captured by Tenar in the labyrinth; they must learn to trust each other and eventually he takes her away with him and gives her a new life in the Archipelago. Reading this for the first time as a teenage girl (and many times since) it was easy to identify with her confusion and loss of her own identity. There's a very subtle love affair between the two of them that can't become more as he is a celibate mage; she is much yoiunger but they meet as equals and develop trust in each other.