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Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and The Artistic Temperament
     

Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and The Artistic Temperament

4.8 12
by Kay Redfield Jamison
 

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From the author of the New York Times bestseller, An Unquiet Mind, Touched with Fire is an authoritative look at the relationship between manic-depressive illness and the artistic temperament. Psychiatrist Jamison advocates a restrained, humanistic approach to treatment that does not "cure" the disorder at the expense of artistic inspiration.

Overview

From the author of the New York Times bestseller, An Unquiet Mind, Touched with Fire is an authoritative look at the relationship between manic-depressive illness and the artistic temperament. Psychiatrist Jamison advocates a restrained, humanistic approach to treatment that does not "cure" the disorder at the expense of artistic inspiration.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Drawing from the lives of artists such as Van Gogh, Byron and Virginia Woolf, Jamison examines the links between manic-depression and creativity. (Oct.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780029160039
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
02/29/2000
Pages:
370
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 8.27(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Kay Redfield Jamison, PhD, is the bestselling author of An Unquiet Mind, Touched with Fire, and other books. She is a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and has been named a “Hero of Medicine” by Time.

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Touched with Fire: Manic-Depressive Illness and The Artistic Temperament 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unfortunately reading this I had in mine Kay Redfield Jamison's classic memoir 'An Unquiet Mind' That in my opinion is a truly great,classic work. The present work is more an academic study.It does not have the vital element of her own experience as center. There is a sense that many of the things return upon themselves, and many are already well -known. She writes very well . But for me the book did not really give insight into what might be called the ' heart of the mystery' why of all the millions of depressives in the world do a few emerge as great literary creators. By the way it seems to me a far deeper work would center on the all- time master of dark moods, anxiety certainly, Kafka .In these realms he has no equal, and takes us to places no one else has gone before him. Perhaps it is unfair to ask for a book that the writer did not write. There is no doubt that there is much to be learned and understood from this work. Forgive me for saying again that her memoir is a truly great work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have biopolar I and have had my share of mood swings for years. These always happened when I tried to ease myself off one of my medications, for I was tired of feeling like a zombie. Down and down I went to the point that, if I were more creative, I could have written a poem the likes of which the world has yet to read. I am not ashamed to admit that many of the poetry selections in the book moved me to tears. Perhaps only a person who has gone through the hell of depression can experience such emotion. Dr. Jamison made a very impressive argument for the link (gene) between manic-depressives and creative genius. It was astonishing to learn that I am in such great company as Lord Byron, Walt Whitman Samuel Clemens, Joseph Conrad, Sergey Rachmaninoff and so many others. Alas, I lack the talent to create such astonding works as they have, but, at least, I do possess the sensitivity to appreciate what they have given to the world. Although the book contains many facts, figures and graphs, it is still a book to be read and cherished, especially by those who have been 'touched with this fire.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
My mother has manic-depressive illness. She was in and out of psychiatric wards and it was difficult growing up with people talking about how 'crazy' she was. I read this book and it gave me a whole new perspective on her illness and the many great minds that have experienced the same intensity of emotions. Before, I thought of it as purely a negative disorder. After reading this book, I believe that the science of genetic testing should not be used to filter out manic-depressive genes. Those same genes also carry the potential for qualities that are vital to the human race, as pointed out in the link to creative genius. Our world would become too boring without people like my mother.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kay provides compelling evidence that there is indeed a connection between creativity and bipolar disorder. She has written a very interesting and well-researched book. Highly recommended.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You are an over achiever - a star in your profession - honors in academics - and suddenly you find yourself loosing your grip - you plunge - and you plunge and you plunge - Jaminson leads you to the understanding of your 'Fine Maddness' - and enlightens you to the choices you can make to control the gift of 'Fine Maddness'
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SUZYQ22 More than 1 year ago
I found this book about Bipolar Disorder to be very helpful. I have found it helpful to read as many books as possible about this disorder as my daughter has Bipolar 1. Another new book just released I found inspiring and has given me great hope is a new memoir called I just want my daughter back - coming to terms with Bipolar 1 by BC Levinson that I found on Amazon.com . Seeing how others cope with bipolar disorder has made a big difference in our journey. It gives hope to those of us walking in these shoes. I actually found the new book through Twitter.com.. you can even chat with the author @BIPOLARSMOM2 . Very nice lady.. Hope this helps Sue
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