Tower-102

Tower-102

by Alexander Dupuis

Paperback

$12.95
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Overview

Tower-102 is a tragi-comedy set at a small radio station in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California during the mid-1980s. The rest of the country is riding the self-indulgent wave of the prosperous Reagan years, but the air staff, the disc jockeys and newscasters of KTWR-FM, Tower-102 are struggling just to keep body, soul and head together and manage their variously troubled lives. The fate of Robert Bury, a young newscaster at the station, reflects the fates of his friends and co-workers as he, like they, engages in the struggle to move on up...or just to move on.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780595100743
Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date: 08/05/2000
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.58(d)

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Tower-102 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If this is Alexander Dupuis' first novel (and this is the first time I've come across his name) I certainly hope it isn't his last. This tongue-in-cheek look at the world of small-town radio is both riotously funny and heartbreakingly sad. Set in northern California during the mid-1980's, the years when the Yuppies were just starting to put material excess 'on the map,' this tale ironically features a cast of characters who are anything BUT Yuppies--the somewhat marginalized characters of a small-town radio station who divide their time between dreaming of the bright lights and dealing with the bitter business of trying to manage life in the low-pay, low-rent world of commercial radio's 'single-A' leagues. The book's hilarious climax, in which a disaffected ex-deejay who has been fired from 'Tower-102' commits an outrageous act of 'audio vandalism' against his former employers, is at the same time a brilliantly funny and outrageous scene. Dupuis gets 'inside' his characters very well, the story being told by a narrator who is a member of the crew, a reporter/broadcaster in the station's shoestring news department. He's an observer of all that's going on around him, and a fellow celebrant in the mysteries of life as a bottom-feeder in the broadcast business, a self-conscious member of that group whose rallying cry, in the face of miserable pay, broken relationships and trouble with the IRS, remains always 'What? And give up showbiz?' I really enjoyed this book. I recommend it.