Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain: How a New Science Reveals Our Extraordinary Potential to Transform Ourselves

Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain: How a New Science Reveals Our Extraordinary Potential to Transform Ourselves

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Overview

Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain: How a New Science Reveals Our Extraordinary Potential to Transform Ourselves by Sharon Begley, Eliza Foss

Is change possible? Everyone who has tried and failed, wished they could be happier, or has been told they were too old to learn something, has wondered why we just seem to be stuck with ourselves. But this amazing and hopeful audiobook shows us that it is not only possible for us to control our brains but also for us to rewire them.

In late 2004, the Mind and Life Institute brought Western Scientists together with the Dalai Lama and other distinguished Buddhist masters to discuss the cutting edge research being conducted in neuroplasticity, which examines whether neurons can be changed and even grown.

The findings are as astonishing as they are helpful. Flying in the face of previous assumptions, the current research shows that not only is it possible for us to change the physical brain, but it is within reach of every single one of us.

Through research into neuroplasticity, it has been shown that we can:

• Reset our happiness meter

• Heal from depression, even major episodes

• Learn new skills even in old age

• Learn—and even teach—compassion, a critical finding for personal happiness and a more peaceful world

Surprising, encouraging, and full of good news that we all want to hear, Sharon Begley's Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain will help us not only change our brains but also the way we approach our lives—for the better.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781593979515
Publisher: Macmillan Audio
Publication date: 02/27/2007
Edition description: Abridged
Sales rank: 1,117,356
Product dimensions: 5.44(w) x 5.79(h) x 0.79(d)

About the Author

Sharon Begley is the science editor of the The Wall Street Journal and was formerly a senior editor at Newsweek magazine for twenty-five years. She has won many awards for her articles and is a frequent guest on radio and television, discussing science topics on The Charlie Rose Show, Today Weekend, the CBS Morning Show, the Imus Show, Fox & Friends and others.

Eliza Foss has performed in numerous theaters both in New York City and around the country. She's performed in Ten Unknown, Natural Selection, and Angels Don't Dance, among others. She has appeared in the films Split Ends and Chutney Popcorn as well as on television in Law & Order and The Merrow Report. She holds a M.F.A from the New York University Graduate Acting Program. Eliza has narrated over thirty audiobooks and short stories, including The Mermaid Chair by Sue Monk Kidd, The Beck Diet Solution by Judith S. Beck, and Big Love by Sarah Dunn. She was featured in AudioFile magazine as one of “audio’s hottest romance narrators.”

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Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain: How a New Science Reveals Our Extraordinary Potential to Transform Ourselves 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It gave an ample information and examples of how the brain works and can be reset. It is not precisely a guide on how to achieve it.
danielle shelton More than 1 year ago
This book ties together disparate fields of study, Western neuroscience and Tibbetan Buddhism, to demostrate the power of the mind to overcome its 'wiring.' Begley's writing is understandable to one with neither a scientific nor a Buddhist backround. Now, however, I am anxious both to share this book with friends who treat the mentally ill and to learn to meditate to gain deeper awareness and compassion.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For nearly a century, scientific dogma held that the brain is immutable, fixed by genes and early upbringing. Wall Street Journal science writer Sharon Begley recently visited the frontiers of neuroscience and returned with a news flash: The dogma is wrong. Researchers have discovered that the brain remains plastic, lifelong. This creates new frontiers: Stroke victims can rewire their brains using challenging exercises deaf people can repurpose dormant auditory cortexes for other tasks and blind people can begin to ¿see¿ patterns of Braille dots using a seemingly dead visual cortex. Suspecting that they were on to a general pattern, researchers soon looked for similar changes in ¿normal¿ brains. Working repetitively on your golf swing, playing the piano or learning a language, they found, also change your brain in lasting, important ways, as does practicing compassion toward others. Begley arrives with heavyweight friends: a foreword by the Dalai Lama and a preface by Daniel Goleman of Emotional Intelligence. If you want to understand how the brain keeps working, and how to make yours do more of what you want it to, we think you should start here. Your brain will thank you.
countryboy22 More than 1 year ago
This is one of the book can help any person . And the new science reveals our extraordinary potential to transform ourselves .
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this book looked interesting (from a book club suggestion) but it was very difficult to understand. I am an educated reader but gave up reading it after the first chapter. I donated it to the library book sale.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Filled with interesting stories, quotes, and ideas about Buddhism and the evolution of the field of neuroscience, this book is truly a pleasure to read. My field of study as a graduate student at Johns Hopkins, the somatosensory areas of the brain that are responsible for our sense of touch, is described in some detail. Indeed, much of what we know about neural plasticity comes from studies of the somatosensory system, including the work of Merzenich, Sur, and others that is described in this book. I also think the reader comes away with the feeling that neuroscience and Buddhism are not mutually exclusive ways of understanding the brain and the mind, but are actually complementary. And, as Francis Collins has pointed out, science and spirtuality in general are not mutually exclusive.
Beverly_D More than 1 year ago
This book is an excellent collection of stories and studies on how it appears that animals - and humans - can rewire their brains. Rewire in case of damage, rewire in cases of missing senses (sight, sound), rewire via training to compensate for certain learning disabilities like dyslexia. If you don't know much about this field *raises hand* it's exciting, and Begley's writing is excellent. But in many ways it feels like a first quarter report card. There's still so much we DON'T know, that the overall impact is impossible to truly measure, yet, and to the author's credit, she doesn't try to tie up all the loose ends. I recommend this read, and at the same time, maybe it's me being used to instant gratification, I feel frustrated because I know people whose brains could use rewiring (including mine) but am pretty sure I can't invest tens of thousands of hours in meditation like a Buddhist monk. If you're looking for a self-help formula to make your own life better, this isn't it... There are hints, there are ideas, but there is no spoon feeding, and no guarantees.
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