The Training of Socket Greeny

The Training of Socket Greeny

by Tony Bertauski

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Overview

A year has passed since the Paladin Nation was exposed to the public. 

Their mission is still to protect humanity from whatever may threaten them. Previously, it was the human duplications, but now that they've been extinguished their biggest challenge is dealing with the complications of public image. Socket Greeny, now 17 years old, has been a Paladin cadet for the past year and is nearing the final test. But that's the least of his problems. 

He's trying to live two lives: one as a superhero while hanging onto his normal life. While fearlessly dealing with his masochistic trainer, he's trying to salvage his deteriorating relationship with his girlfriend back home. But Socket's greatest challenge is to find his true enemy. 

He discovers that fear has many faces.


INTERVIEW WITH THE AUTHOR

When did you start writing?
My first effort started with Socket Greeny. It was a story I started for my son because he hated to read. It didn't work, but this character – Socket – took root. It was the first time I felt possessed by a character with a story to tell. It took me 5 years and countless rewrites to get it right. I waited by the mailbox after that, but the giant paycheck never arrived.

If you can't make money, why write fiction?
I didn't say you can't make money. There are a lot of people out there with a good book, whether it's romance, dystopia, science fiction or young adult. I'm just a minnow in a crowded pond. It took a good deal of networking and research to realize just how hard it is. 

Thanks to epublishing, I can get the book out. That frees me up to write what inspires me. Writing is the true love. There's something deeply satisfying to have characters come to life in your mind and watch their stories unfold. It's a deeper experience than reading someone else's story.

What do you want readers to get from your stories?
I've always been inspired by fearless writing that asked poignant questions; questions like who am I and what is the universe? Things that made me look at life slightly different; books that exposed a layer of reality. Writing in the young adult genre appealed to me most because that's the age I really craved those questions and answers.

I want readers to see the world slightly different.

What is your favorite character?
I love a bad, bad antagonist that you can't entirely hate; there's some smidgeon of redemption you feel inside this demented, sorry character. Heath Ledger's Joker. A despicable character that didn't deserve an ounce of pity, but, for some reason, I didn't hate him as much as I should have. It's that character I find most intriguing. In The Socket Greeny Saga, the character Pike was my Joker.

Product Details

BN ID: 2940153214689
Publisher: DeadPixel Publications
Publication date: 06/06/2013
Series: Socket , #2
Sold by: Draft2Digital
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 385 KB

About the Author

I grew up in the Midwest where the land is flat and the corn is tall. The winters are bleak and cold. I hated winters.

I always wanted to write. But writing was hard. And I wasn’t very disciplined. The cold had nothing to do with that, but it didn’t help. That changed in grad school.

After several attempts at a proposal,  my major advisor was losing money on red ink and advised me to figure it out. Somehow, I did.

After grad school, my wife and my two very little children moved to the South in Charleston, South Carolina where the winters are spring and the summers are a sauna (cliche but dead accurate). That’s when I started teaching and writing articles for trade magazines. I eventually published two textbooks on landscape design. I then transitioned to writing a column for the Post and Courier. They were all great gigs, but they weren’t fiction.

That was a few years later.

My daughter started reading before she could read, pretending she knew the words in books she propped on her lap. My son was a different story. In an attempt to change that, I began writing a story with him. We made up a character, gave him a name, and something to do. As with much of parenting, it did not go as planned. But the character got stuck in my head.

He wanted out.

A few years later, Socket Greeny was born. It was a science fiction trilogy that was gritty and thoughtful. That was 2005.

I have been practicing Zen since I was 23 years old. A daily meditator, I wanted to instill something meaningful in my stories that appeals to a young adult crowd as well as adult. I hadn’t planned to write fiction, didn’t even know if I had anymore stories in me after Socket Greeny.

Turns out I did.

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Training of Socket Greeny 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
recupefashion on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The book starts about where the first one left off. Greeny has now been in full training for the past year, discovering his powers.With his trainer, he tries to gain control over all his powers so he can become one of the strongest Paladin.The Paladins all think he is very special and put their hopes in him.It's been a year now that the public knows about the Paladin nation and their main goal is to protect the humans. Before it was from the duplicates, but now something worse is working itself along the top of the Paladin nation, but no one has a clue yet except Greeny who has another gift which he doesn't yet control. He sees into the future. Greeny is now 17 years old. He has to pass the final test that will make him a true Paladin.Greeny rarely gets the chance to go back home and see his friends, Streeter doesn't go to school anymore because he's hooked on his skin mode permanently, until Greeny succeeds in helping him out but not without some problems. Everytime he goes out to see his girlfriend back home, something bad happens.But Greeny tries to hold on to his old life while trying to become a Paladin which his trainer says is impossible and he has to be forgotten by everyone. But Greeny doesn't see it that way.Through his endless trainings with a tough trainer, Greeny must find his true enemy and he will learn that it can have many faces.Will he succeed the final test?I really loved this read, though there are some technical wording, it won,t keep you from understanding the story. The weird thing is at first when I started to read the first book, I didn't know if I would be enticed by this type of book, but I surprisingly was, goes to show you that even at 47 years old, youshould never be put off by any type of reading. Can't wait to read the final book in this trilogy.I give this book a 4.5 stars.
hideandread on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of Socket Greeny continues. In The Training of Socket Greeny, Socket works on developing his powers as a Paladin, while maintaining some sense of self. As his old life begins to slip away, however, he finds himself struggling to meet the needs of his loved ones and the demands of a race that sees human attachments as little more than hindrances. As he fights to preserve all that he holds dear, he uncovers a sinister plot that could very well end the world as we know it. Quite the plateful for the average seventeen-year-old. Fortunately, Socket Greeny soon shows that he is anything but average.In the second installment of the Socket series, readers are promptly dropped back into the world of Paladins and servys and grimmets. For those who remember the original novel, the sequel makes it easy to fall back into the story without all of those pesky reminders that plague many a book from a series. For the uninitiated, however, the lack of explanation will likely prove frustrating; I highly recommend reading The Discovery of Socket Greeny first. It makes for a much more cohesive tale.For the first two-thirds of the novel, my assessment was that this book is better than Discovery, in terms of connection to the protagonist and the accessibility of his internal and external conflicts. Bertauski showed that he has grown as a storyteller and improved upon his ability to make the reader care. With that said, the last third of the novel was something like a confused blur, or a stream-of-consciousness relaying of a psychedelic experience: limited in comprehensibility and kind of trippy. It brushed upon the metaphysical, but for a young adult novel, the questions of presence and understanding may be a bit much; it was certainly heavier than I'd anticipated. Incidentally, much of it reminds me of Buddhist concepts of worldview, but I digress.Mind-bending descriptions aside, the novel is easy to read, as the language is accessible and quite adept at sticking to the story. While there is some profanity, I have little doubt that it is verbiage to which the average teenager has already been exposed. My only real gripe is that last few chapters of the novel felt sloppy compared to the rest, with confusion of words such as eminent/imminent and allude/elude, as well as the loss of some grammatical correctness and consistency in tense. Many may not care; unfortunately, I found that it detracted from what was shaping up to be an enjoyable experience.When it comes down to it, The Training of Socket Greeny is about the maturation and development of a teenage world savior, rather than a basic rundown of the boy's schedule and a trite recitation of how it tired it made him feel. It is this aspect that allows young adult readers to connect with the work and invest in its characters. The superpowers and the heroism simply are, to make use of a terribly hackneyed cliche, icing on the cake.Hide and Read(Review copy provided by the author)
wrighton-time on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Article first published as Book Review: The Training of Socket Greeny by Tony Bertauski on Blogcritics. Having been involved in the destruction of the Duplicates, those copies of the human race, out to destroy the human population, Socket Greeny is back. In The Training of Socket Greeny, Tony Bertauski has further developed his story of Socket Greeny and brought us another installment of a great science fiction tale. Socket is the protagonist and now very involved in the training program for the Paladin Nation.The training is harrowing involving many techniques we associate more with martial arts and mind control than actual physical power. Socket struggles to understand why his trainer, Pon, continues to use Duplicates as targets. Eradicated during the first war, why are they still considered the enemy? Trying to clear his mind of such questions, he must concentrate to win this latest round, which involves a replicate of his mother.This exercise is to get him to a level where he can destroy the Duplicate before it murders his replicated mother. Even as Socket continues his attacks, the program learns his process making it more difficult to beat. Trying to use the different techniques learned through his trainer, he hopes this time to win. His day is not complete until he beats the program. He must be ready for the Realization testing, which will determine whether he becomes a Paladin.After succeeding at saving his replicated mother, Socket takes the time coming to him to return to his home and look up his friends Chute and Streeter. As he relaxes, he realizes that he feels different. Is the stress of training causing his entire system to break down?When he struggles to locate his friends, he finds that Streeter is going through an addiction, one he must control himself, and that Chute has made a life of her own, one that does not involve her friendship with either Streeter or himself. Yet the connection is still there. As usual, unable to leave things alone, Socket ends up using his new skills when he and his friends are threatened.Punishment for using his skills is swift restricting further leave until after testing. Socket Greeny is returned to base to continue his training. When Pon steps in as a sparring partner, anger sparks within Socket, which unleashes a power that creates major damage to Pon. But Socket cannot remember what he has done or how. After he heals, Pon continues as trainer but only with instruction, Socket no longer sees him. What did happen and how did Socket cause it?Pon is hiding a secret; one the Paladin Nation must see themselves. When the discovery occurs, a new war breaks out. Can Socket help the Paladins save the human population a second time?Socket has grown and developed new and frightening abilities while working and training with Pon. Chute and Streeter too have grown, creating a chasm in their relationships that will be difficult to redress. As Socket tries to bridge the gap, he continues to break rules initiated by the Paladin Nation, which puts him at odds with everyone involved. He is beginning to lose himself, beginning to become invisible to those he is close to, which is a result of becoming a Paladin.Pon has become a force in Socket¿s life. He is trustworthy and loyal, and yet Socket is not sure of him. He does not understand the forces behind Pon, which drive him. Pon is a strong and charismatic trainer; he brings to mind the training received by David Carradine in Kung Fu. Pon is elusive, brave and above all, full of wisdom.The characters continue to grow and develop, and while you miss who they were, you enjoy watching the changes. They are still the same group of kids, but have developed more into separate individuals, and with Socket being the pivotal character, he keeps them safe and together.The Paladin Nation seems a lot like boot camp with the officers and rules. It has its positives as well as negatives, and sets high expectations for its recruits.Tony Bertauski has done an a
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing book,worth reading again and again. If you liked the matrix you will love this
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love the ending and twisted plot lines
hide-and-read More than 1 year ago
The story of Socket Greeny continues. In The Training of Socket Greeny, Socket works on developing his powers as a Paladin, while maintaining some sense of self. As his old life begins to slip away, however, he finds himself struggling to meet the needs of his loved ones and the demands of a race that sees human attachments as little more than hindrances. As he fights to preserve all that he holds dear, he uncovers a sinister plot that could very well end the world as we know it. Quite the plateful for the average seventeen-year-old. Fortunately, Socket Greeny soon shows that he is anything but average. In the second installment of the Socket series, readers are promptly dropped back into the world of Paladins and servys and grimmets. For those who remember the original novel, the sequel makes it easy to fall back into the story without all of those pesky reminders that plague many a book from a series. For the uninitiated, however, the lack of explanation will likely prove frustrating; I highly recommend reading The Discovery of Socket Greeny first. It makes for a much more cohesive tale. For the first two-thirds of the novel, my assessment was that this book is better than Discovery, in terms of connection to the protagonist and the accessibility of his internal and external conflicts. Bertauski showed that he has grown as a storyteller and improved upon his ability to make the reader care. With that said, the last third of the novel was something like a confused blur, or a stream-of-consciousness relaying of a psychedelic experience: limited in comprehensibility and kind of trippy. It brushed upon the metaphysical, but for a young adult novel, the questions of presence and understanding may be a bit much; it was certainly heavier than I'd anticipated. Incidentally, much of it reminds me of Buddhist concepts of worldview, but I digress. Mind-bending descriptions aside, the novel is easy to read, as the language is accessible and quite adept at sticking to the story. While there is some profanity, I have little doubt that it is verbiage to which the average teenager has already been exposed. My only real gripe is that last few chapters of the novel felt sloppy compared to the rest, with confusion of words such as eminent/imminent and allude/elude, as well as the loss of some grammatical correctness and consistency in tense. Many may not care; unfortunately, I found that it detracted from what was shaping up to be an enjoyable experience. When it comes down to it, The Training of Socket Greeny is about the maturation and development of a teenage world savior, rather than a basic rundown of the boy's schedule and a trite recitation of how it tired it made him feel. It is this aspect that allows young adult readers to connect with the work and invest in its characters. The superpowers and the heroism simply are, to make use of a terribly hackneyed cliche, icing on the cake. Hide and Read (Review copy provided by the author)
1000-Plus-Books-to-Read More than 1 year ago
Socket Greeny, the most powerful cadet in the Paladin Nation, is set to take his final test. The pressure is on for Socket, trying to live two lives, one in the Paladin Nation and one in the regular world where his Girlfriend and friends exist. Socket's final test may become his final day in the Paladin Nation and Earth. Lets Talk About It: Book 2 - The Training of Socket Greeny I was really happy to get back into the Paladin Nation and to read more about Socket. I felt really bad for Socket in this book. He had so much on his shoulders. The weight of the final test, the pressure from his trainer, the stress of his girlfriend and of Streeter. I was proud of him too. He came through it all and ended up being the one, yet again, to save the Paladins from total destruction. I was pretty shocked by the final test and what happens (won't spoil it for you). I'll just say I totally didn't see it coming. You won't be disappointed if you pick this one up, in fact make sure you pick up all 3! Melissa Reviewer for 1000 + Books to Read