The Traitor's Wife: A Novel

The Traitor's Wife: A Novel

by Kathleen Kent

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316068642
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 09/26/2011
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 503,796
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Kathleen Kent is the author of The Heretic's Daughter. She lives in Dallas.

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The Traitor's Wife: A Novel 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
BookHounds More than 1 year ago
LOVED IT Originally titled, The Wolves of Andover, The Traitor's Wife is a prequel to The Heretic's Daughter. The new title is more befitting since the wolves are a minor detail throughout the story. This is the story of Martha Allen and her romance with Thomas Carrier during colonial times in the newly colonized America. If you have read the Crucible and know anything about the Salem witch trials, you are already familiar with bits of this tale. The author is a decedent of the Carrier family. Martha is sharped tongued and strong willed, characteristics undesirable as wife. Thomas is actually strong enough to deal with her and finds himself intrigued with this strong woman. Their daughter Sarah, is the main focus of The Heretic's Wife. While this could be considered a romance, it is much more than that. The historical background is astounding and brought to life through the love of this subject by Kent. It is written in period language which at first bothered me and then I really got into the story and it really took off. I couldn't stop reading until I was finished. If you enjoy Philippa Gregory or Alison Weir, you are sure to love this one!
TheLostEntwife on LibraryThing 5 months ago
While I haven¿t read Kathleen Kent¿s previous books (that apparently give the ending to the story of The Traitor¿s Wife), I was intrigued enough to pick this one up and give it a shot. To give you an example of how much I loved this book, I¿ve now purchased Kent¿s other book.The Traitor¿s Wife was originally published under the name The Wolves of Andover ¿ and in a way, I wish that title had stuck. I picked up this book thinking that the title would make sense, and.. while it does in a very subtle way, I just think it gives the wrong impression.This is the prelude to Kent¿s The Heretic¿s Daughter. It explores the relationship between Martha Allen and Thomas Carrier and I loved every single sentence of the book. I was completely immersed in history, surrounded by lush descriptions and found the heroine to be strong, stubborn and strong-willed without having any of the cloying, disgusting whimpering that historical heroines in these types of books can often end up having.The love story between Martha and Thomas was so realistic as well. Not always is love all titters and secretive looks and sneaking out into the barn, it¿s also harsh, it has to be worked at, and there has to be mutual respect between the two people. Although there was not a whole lot of affection shown, I never once doubted that these two were in love with each other and that the marriage would work. A strong relationship like that speaks well for both the characters and the author who puts them to paper.Kathleen Kent has a prominent place in my ¿authors to watch for¿ list. A good historical fiction writer, especially one writing about the early days of America, is not easy to come by but Kent has knocked it out of the ballpark with The Traitor¿s Wife. Put this one on your list to read.
MaryinHB on LibraryThing 5 months ago
LOVED ITOriginally titled, The Wolves of Andover, The Traitor's Wife is a prequel to The Heretic's Daughter. The new title is more befitting since the wolves are a minor detail throughout the story. This is the story of Martha Allen and her romance with Thomas Carrier during colonial times in the newly colonized America. If you have read the Crucible and know anything about the Salem witch trials, you are already familiar with bits of this tale. The author is a decedent of the Carrier family. Martha is sharped tongued and strong willed, characteristics undesirable as wife. Thomas is actually strong enough to deal with her and finds himself intrigued with this strong woman. Their daughter Sarah, is the main focus of The Heretic's Wife.While this could be considered a romance, it is much more than that. The historical background is astounding and brought to life through the love of this subject by Kent. It is written in period language which at first bothered me and then I really got into the story and it really took off. I couldn't stop reading until I was finished. If you enjoy Philippa Gregory or Alison Weir, you are sure to love this one!
jo-jo on LibraryThing 5 months ago
In The Traitor's Wife, Kent takes us back even further in history than she did in The Heretic's Daughter. We are taken back to 1649 England in an effort to help us understand why Thomas Carrier fled from that country and tried to live as secretly as possible when arriving in America.Martha Allen is already living in America with her family, and as a young woman her father only hopes that she will marry soon. He sends her away to help her pregnant cousin Patience maintain her household, but little does Martha know that she will be treated like a common slave upon her arrival. It is at her cousin's home where Martha crosses paths with Thomas Carrier, and it is only a matter of time until they become one anothers friend and confidant.A good portion of this story is about Thomas Carrier and the secret of his past that will follow him for the rest of his life. I will not give this part of the story away, except to say that it really was sad that this conspiracy against Thomas would always follow him. I couldn't help recalling the story of The Heretic's Daughter and realizing that Thomas' secrecy, along with Martha's no-frills attitude and her home remedies, helped persuade all of the neighbors to convict her as a witch.Life for Martha was hard as she tried to help her cousin the best that she could. Patience very quickly makes it known that she is the woman of the house and everyone will abide by her rules. When Martha makes suggestions or blends a special concoction of herbs to make the pregnancy easier for Patience, she finds that Patience no longer trusts her and even thinks that Martha may be harboring ill feelings or spells towards her. I can only imagine how hard life was back then and to add a long and cold winter on top of it, yikes! I'm sure it wouldn't take much for tempers to flare.I loved how this story was written in a way that showed how gentle, but yet strong Thomas was. Although we know the hardships that Martha endured during this time, I feel that I came to know Thomas more for some reason. This was a great story with themes of love, secrecy, and loyalty that would make for either a great book club selection or to read for personal leisure.
astults on LibraryThing 5 months ago
Originally published under The Wolves of Andover, The Traitor's Wife is a prequel of sorts to The Heretic's Daughter as some of the characters are in both books. Though I heard a lot of good things about The Heretic's Daughter, I never got around to reading it. I'll definitely make the time now. The Traitor's Wife was an engrossing read and I didn't want to put it down. Martha is sent to live with her cousin, Patience, who is pregnant with her third child and requires assistance while her husband travels to do trading. Living on the land with them are two hired hands, Thomas and John. Martha is strong-willed and particular in her wants. Thomas immigrated to America from England and is rumored to have executed King Charles I. The chapters alternate between Thomas's pursuers and the developing romance. Set in historic Massachusetts, Kent gives the reader a peek into the difficulties of travel by ship and living on a homestead without any of the conveniences we have today.
OHARADN More than 1 year ago
Absolutly fabulous!!!! Just as great & engaging as The Heretic's Daughter. While a "pre-quel" this volume should not be read first. I loved HD and was not disappointed in the least by The Traitor's Wife. Kent's writting is layered with complex characters, a real feel for the harshness of the then frontier, her characters grow and respond just as know they should. The influences that shapped the young Martha to the woman who went to her death with courage and her head high are clear to see unfolding but, no less interesting. When Martha's father tells her she was not raised to bend and go-along but, to be a person"to be rekoned with" you can fairly feel her spine straighten. Thomas' love and admiration are palpable with barely a word from this stoic welshman. There were times I wanted to slap her cousin, and wondered again at Martha's restraint. I will be passing this one along and highly recommending it to everyone I have already recommended HD to. Oh, & the "secrets' of the red book? No worries, it's all very satisfyingly here!