Transformers and Philosophy: More Than Meets the Mind

Transformers and Philosophy: More Than Meets the Mind

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Transformers and Philosophy: More than Meets the Mind 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dun dun duuuuuuuunnnnn.................
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OMG your dad wrote this book! Do you think he could help me with my TRANSFORMER books oh im sorry my name is hailey portzer im a TRANSFORMERS collecter and book writer im working on my very first TRANSFORMERS book and i really meed some help with it my Autobots name is Demonheart i was thinking since my Autobot in my book talks to Optimus - Prime Optimus tells my autobot that there is another way to become a prime and so my Autobot finds it and it turns her into a prime the first ever shapeshifting prime i dont know if that was a good idea because my autobot is a shapeshifter do you think you can talk to your dad and see if he can help me out please oh and the name of my book is called (THE NEW AGE OF PREDICONS) do you think he could help because its a follow up after Transformers Prime BeastHunters please ask him if he could help me. (Demonheart out!)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
100% all the way
Rabe More than 1 year ago
I have enjoyed many volumes of the Popular Culture and Philosophy series with a few notable exceptions, such as Family Guy and Philosophy and now Transformers and Philosophy. One of the reasons for a lack of enjoyment is that 13 of the essays are either about or must first argue the same discussion: can robots have souls or be considered "living". After the third such essay, the horse was thoroughly dead and flayed but each essay had to reargue the same point over and over again to come to the same conclusion before moving onto other topics. It was rather unenjoyable to continue having the same argument as if the book were a Thanksgiving dinner version of 'Groundhog Day'. Other volumes in the series, when presented with the need to first postulate a stance before delving into another area of discussion will simply refer back to an encompassing essay that discussed the stance and then move into this author's discussion. Not so here. While I can see many interesting discussions regarding the nature of artificial life, xenographic ethical mores, human ethics in regards to other life, a discussion of 'life as we know it', personal identity in changing bodies, et. al., I found those discussions weak because of the pages required to, once again, discuss whether or not Transformers could be considered 'alive'. The basic premise of the book, however, is to introduce philosophical concepts to fans of the subject (here, Transformers). The basic premise does not need to be continuously proven as the audience of this book must already accept the possibility of non-organic, robotic life as fans of the subject. Additionally, with a wide ranging cast of characters, and themes, to choose from, most of the book is dedicated to discussing Optimus Prime and Megatron exclusively. They discuss the same episodes/issues/movies nearly exclusively. In a series that has such broad ranging characters/situations, it was conspicously lacking in depth. Now, I'm not against Megatron or Optimus, I did find the two of them to be among my favorite cast of characters in all the various media depictations of Transformers, but the Transformers, like many successful toy series, had an ever changing cast in order to accommodate new toy lines. In fact, it would have been nice to have seen a philosophical discussion on the morality of half-hour cartoon shows/feature length movies as being little more than grandiose commercials for a product line. This book was a chore to read through, taking multiple days to get through. After reading yet another 'introductary argument' as to whether or not philosophy can apply to 'robots' and/or 'artificial life' for almost every essay, I found my attention wandering to other pursuits. I immensely enjoy the series and still hope to see even more subjects given the treatment, I would just like Blackwell and Open Court publishing to return to original concept of using the subject matter to introduce and explain philosophical concepts as was the case in the first volumes of this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago