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Transgression
     

Transgression

4.0 2
by Fear Factory
 

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When Fear Factory's Archetype LP came out in April 2004, the adversity surrounding it (personnel departures, fleeting breakups, record company woes) fueled the album's most ferocious moments. The band's 2005 effort, Transgression, shares that ferocity, but it's more loosely applied -- it isn't as desperate or on edge as

Overview

When Fear Factory's Archetype LP came out in April 2004, the adversity surrounding it (personnel departures, fleeting breakups, record company woes) fueled the album's most ferocious moments. The band's 2005 effort, Transgression, shares that ferocity, but it's more loosely applied -- it isn't as desperate or on edge as Archetype, instead precision-channeling its rage into ambitious and efficiently written songs. Best of all, Raymond Herrera's totally insane drumming continues to drive the band's explosive heart. Opener "540,000° Fahrenheit" overlays its rhythmic chop with sputtering guitars and a typically mirthful vocal from Burton C. Bell, while "Spinal Compression" crosses and sparks the tension wires of thrash and death metal. The continued, focused intensity of Transgression is evident in the way Fear Factory manages its volatile nature against keyboard lines that glower with drama and turns toward more accessible song structure. Bell himself is a barometer for that volatility. As usual he shifts between a vengeful bark and a contemplative singing voice. But it's where he chooses to use either style that makes songs like songs like "Empty Vision" and "New Promise" really effective. They might not be as immediately heavy, but they're powder kegs of potential. Producer Toby Wright understands where Fear Factory needs some echo, and where they absolutely don't. So Bell's vocals hit some Queensrÿche highs, but he's direct and pissed off when Herrera's at his most vicious and Christian Olde Wolbers' guitar starts scratching barbed wire on steel. Whether at its loudest or most dramatic, Transgression is Fear Factory at their most confident. Whereas on Archetype they delivered a searing take on Nirvana's "School," Transgression features a surprisingly faithful version of Boy-era U2 classic "I Will Follow." The introduction's so close it could almost be a remaster of the original, Bell's just a throatier Bono, and the only real metal concession is the chunkier rhythm guitar and some screaming to punctuate the backgrounds. Now how's that for confident?

Product Details

Release Date:
08/23/2005
Label:
Calvin Spain
UPC:
0846052003725
catalogNumber:
37

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Fear Factory   Primary Artist
Burton C. Bell   Vocals,Group Member
Raymond Herrera   Drums,Group Member
Byron Stroud   Bass,Bass Guitar,Group Member
Christian Olde Wolbers   Guitar,Group Member
Russell Ali   Guitar

Technical Credits

Burton C. Bell   Composer,Engineer
Adam Clayton   Composer
Raymond Herrera   Arranger,Composer,Engineer
Larry Mullen   Composer
Toby Wright   Producer,Engineer,Audio Production
Tom Jermann   Visual Design
Christian Olde Wolbers   Arranger,Composer
Steve Tushar   Engineer
Chad Michael Ward   Still Pictures
Shaun Thingvold   Engineer
Matt Prine   Visual Direction
Jeremy Coleman   Composer
Martin Glover   Composer

Customer Reviews

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Transgression 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fear Factory has done it again. From the first moments of the blistering opener, you know this is going to be another great CD. FF make the two cover songs thier own and "Supernova" is a nice refreshing change of pace. another great CD from a great band
Guest More than 1 year ago
Fear Factory have written another worthy album to add to their already legendary discography. Although not all the songs are heavy, it doesn't mean they're any less enjoyable. "Supernova" sounds more like something from Burton's Ascension of the Watchers project, but puts Fear Factory in a new light. Fans may not embrace this more experimental album, but in no way does it imply that Fear Factory has lost their touch. "Moment of Impact" has one of the catchiest and most crushing guitar riffs ever conceived by Fear Factory. If you're a fan I suggest grabbing this album. Fear Factory have truely proved themselves to the world and they will continue to dominate for many years to come.