Travels

Travels

by Michael Crichton
4.4 32

Paperback(1st Perennial Edition)

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Travels 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book fascinated me. I've read most of Crichton's fiction, and I've been particularly interested in the way his characterizations of men and women have changed over time. Now I understand the background for those changes in his work, after reading this chronicle of decades of this author's personal development. 'New Age' experiences do nothing for me, but I nevertheless found it interesting to read about Crichton's perception of such experiences - and, especially, about his need to have them. The medical school chapters and the straight travel chapters engaged me best, though, because I could relate to them in a way I couldn't hope to relate to his accounts of channeling, exorcism, and so on. Worth reading for Crichton fans, although I'm not sure how much interest this book might hold for someone unfamiliar with his fiction.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a fascinating collection of vignettes, and give entertaining and surprising insights into what turned Michael Crichton into the Michael Crichton we thought we knew. Very fast read, and with mostly short and self-contained essays is perfect to keep on hand for whenever you find yourself with a few free minutes.
818Ray More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed this book quite a bit. Makes me wish I had more opportunities to hit the road more often. Planning a month-long trip in the Fall and this book came recommended from a friend. I gladly pass along that recommendation.
jkphoenix1 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the first part of the book - his experiences in med school and his initial travels - not only for the places he visited, but for the insights into himself and people he met along the way. The end of the book moved far from being a travel book - it became a how-to for meditation and "new age" experiences. I found the change in focus unexpected and disappointing.
basiaaa More than 1 year ago
Maybe because I love to travel, mabye because I love scuba diving, maybe because I love trying wacky new things - who knows - I do know that I love this book. Each chapter is an amusing tale of some kind of an experience in Crichton's life, and I was totally engaged by it.
KaClarkKaClarkBird More than 1 year ago
I am a high school student and his is my first Michael Crichton read. This book has a little something for everyone so I would suggest it to anyone. Crichton did a nice job keeping me engaged throughout the med school, and physical travel sections but lost me a bit towards the end when the book shifted towards self discovery through unusual methods. I can relate to this book because I am an avid traveler any chance I can get but other than being interesting on a personal level I did not see any education value for a high school class. Crichton used a unique writing style because I expected more of a journalistic style or for him to get lost due to his past of writing strictly fiction stories. His fictions had a large impact on this book because he learned how to use literary elements to catch the attention of a reader and not let go of it even while explaining something as seemingly boring as patient analysis in a hospital. This is a great book and think everyone should read it. Even if the only reason is just to have a better understanding on self discovery because this novel definitely hit a few points that changed how I will try to experience moments.
Kahlessa More than 1 year ago
In this book, Crichton recounts his experiences and examines the insights he gained into life as a result. He tells about attending Harvard Medical School, climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro, and directing Sean Connery in a movie, among many other things. Even people who don't care for his fiction can get something from this book. Michael Crichton lead a fascinating life that was over much too soon.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
A must read for any Crighton fan.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book! Since reading this, my boyfriend and I are already planning trips around the world just based on his descriptions and testimony. I am buying this book for a few relatives for Christmas. I thought it was wonderful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best book I've ever read. I feel lucky to have come across it. After reading books upon books yet never feeling satisfied once it was over, I have found a book I enjoyed to the very last word, and beyond that. Michael Crichton, if nothing else, highlights the importance of knowledge gained through personal experience. You may think you know yourself, but there's always more to learn. More than you ever dreamed of.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been reading Chrichton for quite some time now, but none of his books were considered mandatory reading at UCLA, until now. Travels was and still is mandatory reading under most of the psychology and metaphysics classes at UCLA, perhaps there is a lot more to the book and the Author than Jack (Terrible Review Above) so believes. I'd highly recomend this book to anyone who wants to discover either themselves, or a higher level of intellect. During my studies at UCLA, I was somewhat motivated by this book. I now work for the Warm Springs Psychology Ward, and I've witnessed some extrodinary events relating to 'parapsychology', much like the ones that Chrichton experiences in his book 'Travels'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was supremely dismayed by this book where crichton, whom I assumed to be an intelligent and logical person due to his scientifically based stories turns out to be a moron who is totally taken by sham gurus and psuedoscience and tricketsters. Crichton claims to talk to cactuses, and see auras and thinks people can bend spoons with their minds. These are all things that con artists claim to do, but that all have failed to demonstrate when carefully observed. None for example have managed to claim the $1million prize that the randi foundation offers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Being an exchange student in Japan, I can relate to a lot of the experiences in this book. Crichton always talks about discovering himself on all the trips he takes, but in the end it gets a little to odd for me. The actual travels part, and the med school part are cool, but near the end he gets into some crazy stuff, that in my opinion wasn`t totally worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was a little skeptical about this book before I read it, but it turned out to be very entertaining, thought provoking, and satisfying. Every Crichton fan should probably read it just to get the inside scoop on the man himself, perhaps to see what has driven him to write so many fascinating books, and also to see what fuels some of his philosophy that comes through in his writing. 'Travels' certainly isn't all about philosophy, as much of it consists of some very entertaining anecdotes, though there's a philosophical vein that runs through it. It's not preachy, though Crichton seems to be trying to stimulate thinking in the reader. I found myself wishing at times that there wasn't a metaphysical bent to this book, though in the end I suppose it's for the better. Overall, a very engaging read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was thoroughly enjoying the read, until the last chapters got bogged down by spoonbenders and things that were too far 'out there' for me, so I just lightly glanced through the last four or five chapters and seeing that the book only dealt with that stuff, tossed it into the trash can. A suitable expression of my opinion, I thought. I do enjoy his other books; however.