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The Trench (Meg Series #2) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)
     

The Trench (Meg Series #2) (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

4.4 59
by Steve Alten
 

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Steven Alten once again unleashes the power of the MEG in a new heart-stopping thriller. THE TRENCH takes us into the zone of the unknown and the primal terror of what is "own there." Tense, realistic and action-filled, it will hold you in its grip until last chilling page…

Overview

Steven Alten once again unleashes the power of the MEG in a new heart-stopping thriller. THE TRENCH takes us into the zone of the unknown and the primal terror of what is "own there." Tense, realistic and action-filled, it will hold you in its grip until last chilling page…

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
So how bad is this spawn of Meg, which Doubleday declined to publish (albeit perhaps in an earlier version)? About as bad--and as good--as its predecessor. Alten can still write a mean giant prehistoric shark scene, but he flails like a fish out of water at nearly everything else (of his #1 human villain, psycho billionaire Benedict Singer, he writes, "Benedict stood before the window, his arms outspread, emerald eyes blazing as he reveled in his glory"). It's four years after the bloody doings of Meg, and Angel, the daughter of the Carcharadon megalodon of that novel, is now terrifying tourists at a Monterey aquarium. She escapes, however, and starts eating them--munching on yacht-goers, a kayaker, a submariner--and swallows other animals, including a media-darling whale named Tootie, before she returns to her home in the Pacific's Mariana Trench. The novel isn't all d j -vu shark action, though, since Alten bifurcates the narrative. While paleobiologist Jonas Taylor, who killed Meg, pursues Angel across the seas, his wife, Terry, suffers misadventures galore in the Trench as she tries to uncover exactly what that billionaire (who's in partnership with her father, who owns Angel), is up to 35,000 feet down: nasty work involving nuclear fusion supplies for terrorists, it turns out. Alten's evocation of the Trench and its dangers (including more prehistoric beasts), and of the machinery--subs, minisubs and a giant underwater station--that would challenge them, is evocative and backed by rigorous scientific detail. His human vs. human conflict is screechingly melodramatic and his dialogue littered with exclamation points, but when Angel rolls back her eyes and opens her jaws for the kill, readers will remember with a thrill why they picked up this novel in the first place. (July) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
VOYA - Joanna Morrison
Paleo-biologist Jonas Taylor has encountered the shark from hell. A Cacharodon megalodon, this living fossil is believed to be the ancestor of sharks such as the Great White. At sixty feet long, armed with seven-inch teeth, the Meg is the fiercest predator ever known. And hell is the Mariana Trench, the huge underwater canyon that is the deepest part of the planet. In Alten's first book, Meg (Doubleday, 1997), Taylor encountered this underwater nightmare. Not only did Taylor find and kill the Meg, he managed to capture a young Meg, which, when put on display, becomes even more popular than the killer whales of Seaworld. The young Meg, a female, manages to escape from the Tanaka Institute and wreak havoc along the Pacific coastline, engulfing--among other victims--an entire seagoing wedding party. Taylor vows to either recapture or kill it. Meanwhile his wife, Terry, has joined mysterious mogul Benedict Singer aboard a ship whose ostensible purpose is to investigate a recent accident in the Mariana Trench. Terry becomes aware that Singer's motives are not pure and must save herself from both Singer and his nefarious crew as well as... more prehistoric munchers from the Trench! Teens will eat this up. The Trench is recommended for readers who want non-stop suspenseful action, and who can also suspend a sense of disbelief. If Peter Benchley's Jaws (Crest, reissue 1991) or White Shark (St. Martin's, 1995) is in your school library, you will also want Alten's books. VOYA Codes: 3Q 4P S A/YA (Readable without serious defects; Broad general YA appeal; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult and Young Adult).
Library Journal - Library Journal
The Meg (Carcharodon megalodon, a really, really big shark) is back in this sequel to Meg (LJ 5/1/97), which picks up right where Alten's last killer thriller left off (in the second chapter there's even a two-page synopsis recapping the previous action and plot to bring new readers up to speed). Angel, the female offspring of the Meg killed last time around, is being held in captivity and displayed by hero Jonas Taylor and aquarium-owner Masao Tanaka. But Angel is huge and deadly; when she escapes from the aquarium, the predictable rock 'em-sock 'em mayhem ensues. So Jonas must face death and his own fears once again and return to the Marianas Trench in another attempt to rid the world of this prehistoric menace. Nearly a carbon-copy of Meg, this action-packed technothriller reads like a movie script and won't provoke many thoughts but will satisfy fans of Meg and Peter Benchley. Recommended for most fiction collections.--Rebecca House Stankowski, Purdue Univ. Calumet Lib., Hammond, IN Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A sequel to the riveting Meg (1997), continuing the adventures of a prehistoric shark with a mouth like a garage door that marauds in the ocean's upper waters along the California coast. In the previous installment, a supposedly extinct shark species was kept alive by the thermal warmth of smokers on the sea-bottom. When Meg and a pregnant female broke through the sludge and rose topside, all hell broke loose until the pregnant female's offspring was drugged and imprisoned in a Marine showcase near Monterey. Now, four years later, oxygen-rich waters and overfeeding have nurtured the captive Meg to a size larger than either her father or mother. She's in estrous and unfathomably hungry, can smell male sharks and tasty whales offshore, and at last breaks through the steel bars that have been placed between her and the open sea. Since she's just swallowed three young boys, she also has a taste for human flesh. Her rage to feed leads to some startling effects, including a female photographer's being bitten in half in her kayak, with Meg coming back to swallow the kayak and the body's other half. The humans, meanwhile, are total stereotypes, and some of their drama and its setting appear to have been borrowed from James Cameron's film The Abyss. Readers who saw Godzilla know that the climax must involve a whole family of monsters spreading about, although the present tale involves, as well, another extinct species: a reptile that's four or five times larger than Tyrannosaurus Rex doesn't get along with Meg. But don't think Alten will kill off his golden gobbler. Best scene: Meg copulating with a smaller male, than eating him—just a bridal whiff from Melville and D.H. Lawrence.Not exactly taxing on the intellectual side, but a nail-biting summer read. (Author tour)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780613503839
Publisher:
Turtleback Books
Publication date:
06/28/2000
Series:
Meg Series , #2
Edition description:
THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 6.75(h) x 1.25(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

Meet the Author

Steve Alten is the author of the New York Times bestseller, Meg. A native of Philadelphia, he now lives in South Florida with his wife and children.

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The Trench (Meg Series #2) 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 60 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Steve Alten isn't the best writer, in fact the books have a tendency to be formulated, repeat unnecessary information, and can be a bit tedious in spots. However, if you are just looking for a fun read, something to break up reading more informative and well-written books, you could do worse than this.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book, while immensely enjoyable, instilled in me one of maybe three things in my life that have ever truly terrified me: deep, cold, black water, with something, some unknown beast out there just waiting....God, it's scary.
hcw03 More than 1 year ago
Alten continues where he left off. A riveting tale that will keep you on edge. Note for parents -- This book is a little more adult themed than the first novel. Overall, an engaging tale that you won't want to put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's so amazing that I'm going to do a rhyme about it. Here Goes. I couldn't put the book down through and through, I always loved the non-stop action, too. The scenes were great, the characters ever better, not to mention that the shark was always very clever.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A great sequel! More complex and in dpeth than the first. Alten dosen't dissapoint.
jlgc More than 1 year ago
The Trench is the second in the Meg adventure series written by Steve Alten. Tanaka Oceanographic Institute has been housing the young female megalodon for several years. The meg has continued to grow and mature. It is now trying to escape, and escape it does. At the same time, Tanaka’s company has been maneuvered into working with a questionable Russian billionaire, Benedict. Jonas, Mac, and Celeste, Benedict’s protégé, are running up and down the Pacific coast trying to catch the meg, named Angel. They fail epically and people are killed. For some reason, all the blame continues to fall upon Jonas Taylor. Terry, now, Jonas’ wife, ends up underwater with Benedict in the Mariana Trench. Benedict is secretly working with the Iranians and searching for something in the Trench under the guise of relaunched the failed UNIS project. Celeste on a mission to get some specific information from Jonas and Terry is in danger practically from the minute she boards the support ship. I like shark movies, even the silly ones. They are quite humorous. With none of them am I overly concerned about the science of the story. It’s the same with this story. There’s a lot of science in it that I don’t understand. There are feats of strength that are unbelievable. There are episodes of luck that are almost unbelievable unless you are willing to just believe. Some reviewers condemn this book because of that. However, I don’t. The story was well written and cohesive. However, the unsuccessful chasee of Angel seemed to take such a long time and they never even caught the meg. How many stupid ideas can they come up with to catch this animal when they should have just killed it? Jonas knew this but was outvoted and outmaneuvered to the point of death. One thing that I had just a bit of problem with is how fast Jonas healed from his various adventures and was able to continue. Celeste just annoyed me. I didn’t particularly care for Jonas accepting all the blame that was directed at him and then some for a situation he continually tried to stop without the help of those who should have been helping him. I also didn’t care for the relationship between Jonas and Terry. I believe that Terry went into the marriage with eyes wide open and shouldn’t have been giving Jonas flack within a few years of marriage. Especially when Jonas was continually concerned with the fact that it was a matter of time before Angel escaped and nobody else would listen his warnings. However, I was happy to see fidelity in both Jonas and Terry when they were tempted and tested. And Jonas was very much tested by Celeste. I could have done without the interaction between Sergei and Terry. However, I understand that with bad guys, sometimes you have to show just how bad they are. Overall, I would recommend this book if you like deep sea adventures, giant shark stories, and interesting pseudo-science. It’s not great literature, but it’s a good yarn.
Bastett More than 1 year ago
Action packed and full of great scenes, this was one book I could not put down. After the first book I was on the edge of my seat. This book pushed me over the edge and wouldn't stop. If you haven't read Meg, put this on your short list. This is one series I am happy I took a chance on. It's worth your time.
aprilmrm More than 1 year ago
This installment in the Meg series isn't nearly as good as the first, but it entertains nonetheless. It picks up a few years later in Jonas and Terry's lives. Is it the best writing? No. Is it incredibly far-fetched? Yes. But I enjoy aquatic predator plots, and this book qualifies. There is great attention to detail and plenty of startling action. Not the best in the series but not the worst either.
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Booktraveler More than 1 year ago
The Plot is compelling. The characters face issuses with all the realistic inner conflits that all people feel, when they are being tested. A good read...it kept me up way past my bed time.