Trends In International Migration

Trends In International Migration

by Oecd Publishing

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9789264019447
Publisher: Turpin Distribution Services (OECD)
Publication date: 02/02/2004
Pages: 388
Product dimensions: 8.25(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

General introduction15
Part IMain Trends in International Migration
Summary22
A.Migration and population trends23
1.Trends in migration movements23
2.Change in the foreign population42
B.Immigrants and the labour market49
1.The status of foreigners in the labour markets of OECD countries in 200249
2.Foreign labour in the past decade58
C.An overview of migration policies67
1.Policies for controlling flows and fighting irregular migration67
2.Renewed interest in selective labour-related migration policies72
3.Improving measures to facilitate the labour market and social integration of immigrants77
4.The emergence of a European immigration policy80
Part IIRegional Aspects of Migration
Summary90
Introduction90
1.The choice of residence of immigrants: an overview of the main issues91
2.Implementation of regional programmes for migration106
Conclusion109
Annex 1The Adjusted Geographic Concentration index (AGC)111
Annex 2Immigrant and non-immigrant flows and stock of foreign-born persons: distribution of immigrants by state of intended residence, for various admission categories and places of birth, United States, 2000112
Part IIIThe International Mobility of Health Professionals: An Evaluation and Analysis Based on the Case of South Africa
Summary116
Introduction116
1.Movements of highly skilled workers to and from South Africa: a historical perspective117
2.A review of the human resources situation in the healthcare sector in South Africa: the role of international mobility121
3.Causes and consequences of international mobility of health professionals128
4.Some aspects of South African government policies to stem emigration by the highly skilled131
5.The lessons of the South African experience with regard to the international mobility of health professionals: greater international co-operation and policy coherence135
Conclusion139
Annex 1Distribution of official migration flows by occupation, 1988-2000146
Annex 2List of countries and regions for which NHS decided not to actively recruit health professionals150
Part IVRecent Changes in Migration Movements and Policies (Country Notes)
Australia154
Austria158
The Baltic States162
Belgium168
Bulgaria172
Canada176
Czech Republic181
Denmark185
Finland189
France193
Germany199
Greece203
Hungary207
Ireland211
Italy216
Japan220
Korea225
Luxembourg228
Mexico233
Netherlands237
New Zealand242
Norway246
Poland251
Portugal255
Romania259
Slovak Republic263
Spain267
Sweden272
Switzerland277
Turkey282
United Kingdom285
United States290
Statistical Annex
Introduction295
A.Sources and comparability of migration statistics295
1.Sources of migration statistics297
2.Measurement of migration flows298
3.Stocks of migrants and characteristics of the immigrant population300
B.Statistical series303
List of SOPEMI correspondants385
List of Maps, Charts, Tables and Boxes
Part IMain Trends in International Migration
Charts
I.1.Inflows of foreigners in some OECD countries, 1980-200124
I.2.Permanent and long-term immigration flows into selected OECD countries by main categories in 200133
I.3.Change in inflows of migrants by country of origin to selected OECD countries, 1990-2000 and 200138
I.4.Stocks of foreign and foreign-born populations in selected OECD countries, 200143
I.5.Total stock of foreigners and foreign-born in OECD countries by region of origin, 200145
I.6.Components of total population growth in the European Union and selected OECD countries, 1960-200147
I.7.Participation rate of foreigners by country or region of nationality, selected OECD countries, 200252
I.8.Proportion of foreigners or foreign-born in total unemployment, relative to their share of the labour force, 2001-2002 average53
I.9.Changes in foreign and total employment during economic recoveries59
I.10.Unemployment of foreigners and contribution of foreign employment to the increase of total employment between 1994 and 2002 in selected OECD countries60
I.11.Employment and unemployment rate for selected categories of workers according to nationality, 2001-2002 average63
I.12.Composition of foreign non-employment by sex and proportion in total non-employment in 2002 in selected OECD countries65
I.13."Atypical" employment by nationality in selected European OECD countries and in the United States, 200266
I.14.Naturalisation rate in selected OECD countries, 1990-200179
Tables
I.1.Entries of temporary workers in certain OECD countries by principal categories, 1992, 1998-200128
I.2.Intracompany transferees in selected OECD countries, 1996-200131
I.3.Cross-border workers in selected OECD countries, 1996-200132
I.4.Inflows of asylum seekers in 200234
I.5.Stock of foreign students in selected OECD countries, 200136
I.6.Relative importance of the top 5 countries in the total immigration flows and stocks of foreigners in selected OECD countries40
I.7.Foreign or foreign-born population in selected OECD countries, 1996 and 200144
I.8.Foreign or foreign-born labour force in selected OECD countries, 1995 and 200250
I.9.Participation rate and unemployment rate of nationals and foreigners by sex in selected OECD countries, 2001-2002 average51
I.10.Foreign and national adult (25-64) populations classified by level of education in selected OECD countries54
I.11.Additional jobs required to equalise national and foreign unemployment rates in selected OECD countries, 200255
I.12.Employment of foreigners by sectors, 2001-2002 average56
I.13.Distribution of education attainment between foreign entries and exits from the labour force between 1994 and 2002, compared to that of nationals and all foreigners in the labour force in 1994, selected OECD countries61
I.14.Main regularisation programmes of immigrants in an irregular situation in selected OECD countries, by nationality71
Boxes
I.1.Migration statistics26
I.2.The growing importance of foreign workers in providing care for the elderly and children57
I.3.Bilateral labour agreements and other forms of recruitment of foreign workers: evaluation and prospects73
I.4.The economic and social aspects of migration78
Part IIRegional Aspects of Migration
Maps
II.1.Foreign population in the European regions, 200192
II.2.Foreign-born population in the Australasian regions, 200193
II.3.Foreign-born population in the Canadian regions, 200193
II.4.Foreign-born population in the United States, 200094
II.5.Income per household in the United States, 1999100
II.6.Distribution of the foreign-born population by state in the United States, 2000102
II.7.Distribution of the foreign population in the European regions, 2001103
Charts
II.1.Geographic concentration of foreigners, 200195
II.2.Size and concentration of the foreign population, 200196
II.3.Regional attractiveness and concentration of foreigners, 200198
Tables
II.1.Geographic distribution of foreigners, 200196
II.2.Concentration of foreigners by type of regions, 200197
II.3.Visas delivered in the framework of the regional programmes, Australia, 1996-2003107
II.4.Distribution of inflows and stocks of immigrants by states/territories, selected SSRM Initiatives, Australia, 2002-2003108
Boxes
II.1.The OECD Regional Typology98
II.2.Cross-border workers in the European Union99
Part IIIThe International Mobility of Health Professionals: An Evaluation and Analysis Based on the Case of South Africa
Charts
III.1.Migration flows in South Africa, 1971-2001 (official data)118
III.2.Emigration of South African professionals, 1980-2000 (official data)118
III.3.Evolution of migration flows in South Africa, 1989-2001 (official and adjusted data)119
III.4.Migration flows of health professionals in South Africa, 1988-2000 (official data)123
III.5.Migration flows of health professionals in South Africa by categories, 1988-2000 (official data)124
III.6.Requests for certificates of qualification by South African nurses, 1991-2002125
III.7.Intentions declared by young South African doctors for assignment at the end of community service, 1999-2001125
III.8.Diagram of the principal axes of international mobility of health professionals between the old Commonwealth countries, the United States and Cuba (by country of birth)128
Tables
III.1.Numbers and breakdown by educational level of persons aged 15 and over born in South Africa and residing in certain OECD member countries120
III.2.Number of health professionals registered with their respective councils, 1996-2001122
III.3.Number of South African-born workers practising a medical profession in certain OECD member countries in 2001126
III.4.United Kingdom recruitment of South African nurses126
Boxes
III.1.The reliability of migration statistics119
III.2.Forecasting the emigration of highly skilled South Africans120
Part IVRecent Changes in Migration Movements and Policies
Tables
IV.1.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign-born population, Australia155
IV.2.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Austria159
IV.3.Components of population changes since 1990, Baltic States163
IV.4.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Belgium169
IV.5.Current figures on foreign flows and stocks, Bulgaria174
IV.6.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign-born population, Canada177
IV.7.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreigners, Czech Republic182
IV.8.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Denmark187
IV.9.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population, Finland190
IV.10.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, France194
IV.11.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Germany200
IV.12.First results of the 2001 Population Census, Greece204
IV.13.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population, Hungary208
IV.14.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Ireland212
IV.15.Current figures on foreign population, Italy217
IV.16.Inflows of foreigners by status of residence, 1998-2001, Japan221
IV.17.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Japan223
IV.18.Foreign workers by category, 1998-2001, Korea226
IV.19.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Luxembourg229
IV.20.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population, Mexico234
IV.21.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Netherlands238
IV.22.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign-born population, New Zealand243
IV.23.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population, Norway247
IV.24.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreigners, Poland252
IV.25.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Portugal256
IV.26.Current migration figures, Romania261
IV.27.Current migration figures, Slovak Republic264
IV.28.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Spain268
IV.29.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Sweden273
IV.30.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, Switzerland278
IV.31.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population, Turkey283
IV.32.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign population and labour force, United Kingdom286
IV.33.Current figures on flows and stocks of foreign-born population, United States291
Boxes
IV.1.Working Holiday Makers245
IV.2.The new quota system270

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