The Trial: A Thriller

The Trial: A Thriller

by Larry D. Thompson

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429927345
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 03/29/2011
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 400,254
File size: 360 KB

About the Author

LARRY D. THOMPSON is a managing partner of the Houston trial firm he founded. He is the proud father of three grown children and admiring brother of the late author Tommy Thompson. He lives in Houston, Texas


LARRY D. THOMPSON is a managing partner of the Houston trial firm he founded. He is the proud father of three grown children and admiring brother of the late Tommy Thompson, author of the classic Blood and Money. He lives in Houston, Texas.

Read an Excerpt

The Trial


By Larry D. Thompson

St. Martin's Press

Copyright © 2011 Larry D. Thompson
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4299-2734-5


CHAPTER 1

The elevator doors opened at the penthouse level of Ceventa Pharmaceutical's headquarters just outside Washington, D.C., and a group of executives from the lower floors stepped into the executive suite. They talked among themselves as they waited for the CEO's assistant to end a phone call. When the blond assistant hung up, one young man grinned. "Hey, beautiful, what's going on? Why the command performance with only fifteen minutes notice?"

"You'll have to ask Dr. Kingsbury," she replied. "Please join the others in the boardroom. Coffee and sodas are on the credenza."

The penthouse housed Dr. Kingsbury's office along with a private health club, a gigantic boardroom, and the reception area. The reception area was thirty feet by twenty. At one end was the assistant's desk guarding the door to Kingsbury's inner sanctum. The remainder of the area was covered with antique chairs and sofas from the eighteenth century, part of Kingsbury's private collection. The burnt gold carpet was thick enough to absorb all but the loudest voice. At the end opposite the assistant's desk were two double doors with ornate brass handles.

The group walked to the double doors and opened them to find the boardroom full of other Ceventa executives. Some were seated in the twenty-four leather chairs around the long oval conference table. Others stood behind the chairs, drinking coffee from porcelain cups, also burnt gold in color. The room was filled with an expectant buzz of conversation and questions. Several managers speculated on why they were summoned to the penthouse. A few merely drank their coffee and waited quietly as they gazed out the windows on the panoramic view of green Maryland hills and the Washington Monument in the distance. All conversation stopped when both doors flew open and the man himself entered, trailed by three assistants.

Dr. Alfred Kingsbury was an imposing figure. Six feet six inches tall, he had long gray hair that he parted in the middle and combed back above his ears. A Vandyke beard gave him a decidedly European look. In fact, he was originally from England, where he had graduated thirty-odd years before with two degrees, one in medicine along with a PhD in pharmacology. Shortly thereafter he joined Ceventa and rose through the ranks to become CEO of the North American subsidiary. His next step to the top of the ladder would be at Ceventa's global headquarters in Copenhagen, where he expected to be placed in charge of the one-hundred-billion-dollar pharmaceutical giant. With no apology for the delay, he stood at the front of the room, unbuttoned the jacket of his Armani three-piece suit, and spoke in a clipped British accent.

"Good morning. We have some exciting news. James, please lower the screen and start the PowerPoint."

The screen dropped silently from the ceiling at the opposite end of the boardroom. The projector came into focus with the company logo, a blue and green globe showing CEVENTA in burnt gold script looping around the earth.

The logo disappeared and was replaced by EXXACIA.

"Most of you are familiar with Exxacia. It's an antibiotic proven efficacious for pneumonia, bronchitis, sinusitis, tonsillitis, and several other infectious diseases. We developed Exxacia at our research and development facility in Copenhagen. It took ten years and nearly a billion dollars before we were ready to take it to market."

As Kingsbury spoke he walked around the table to stand beside the screen, motioning James to bring up slides designed to emphasize the points Kingsbury was making.

"We launched Exxacia in South America originally, and with some carefully crafted promotion, it soon was bringing in over a billion dollars a year on that continent alone. Next we took it to Europe, and combined sales approached five billion."

A self-satisfied grin crossed Kingsbury's face as he extended his arms, palms up. "Now, my dear colleagues, it's 2007 and we are ready to market in the United States. We will be —"

Kingsbury was interrupted by a young researcher who had been standing, arms crossed and leaning against the side wall. He dropped his arms as he spoke. "Dr. Kingsbury, haven't we had some significant problems with that drug in other countries? I've read some of our internal reports that describe liver failure, heart problems, and even death following use of Exxacia. Don't we need to be studying this drug, maybe halt sales in Europe and South America until we figure out what's causing these problems?"

"What's your name, young man?"

"Kinney, sir, Ralph Kinney. I'm a statistician on the third floor."

"Mr. Kinney, your concerns are misplaced," Kingsbury replied sternly. "We all know that any drug has side effects, complications. It's true that some of the people who have taken Exxacia are very sick. Many are elderly, and in flu season no matter what the treatment the elderly will die from the flu." Kingsbury's eyes darted around the room to look for any disagreement with his comments. Blank stares were all he saw, except from Kinney.

"Do you really think we should be selling a drug that may cause liver failure and death just to cure a sinus infection?"

"Mr. Kinney, no one has proved with certainty that Exxacia causes liver problems. Undoubtedly, those who took the drug and died from liver failure had a compromised liver that would have failed in spite of any drug. We can expect to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the United States alone. And I should add that our financial people expect United States sales of between five billion and ten billion dollars three years after FDA approval. That process will start within three months. Our timetable calls for the drug to be approved in eighteen months. No more questions. This meeting is adjourned."

Kingsbury left the boardroom. He stopped briefly at his assistant's desk and in a low voice said, "Get me the personnel file on an employee named Kinney who works on the third floor. I want it this afternoon."

As he turned to walk away his assistant said, "Oh, Dr. Kingsbury, don't forget that tomorrow is Teddy's sixth birthday."

Kingsbury looked back. His scowl had turned to a smile. "Don't worry. I never forget a grandchild's birthday. I'll stop at Toys 'R' Us on the way home this evening, and I'll be leaving early tomorrow for Teddy's party."

CHAPTER 2

Lucas Vaughan parked in an open lot across the street from the old Harris County courthouse in downtown Houston. As he came to a stop, he looked in the rearview mirror and studied his face. I don't like what I'm seeing, he thought. It's only 2004. I'll be forty next month. My hair is turning gray, and I've got dark circles under my eyes. The lines on my face make me look fifty. No wonder. I was up half the night with stomach cramps. Maybe it's time to be doing something else. Luke sighed at the mirror, reached for a bottle of Maalox in the cup holder of his Toyota Sequoia, and took a giant swig. As the Maalox settled into his stomach, a determined look crossed his face. Last day. It's the biggest case of my career. Time to win it.

He grabbed his oversized briefcase from the back, tossed the Maalox in it, waved at the parking attendant, and waited at the corner for the light to change.

"Morning, Luke." Another lawyer approached. "You in trial?"

"Hi, Jock. Yeah, I'm in the third week of a products case against Ford. My client's husband was killed in a rollover."

"I thought the tire manufacturers were responsible for all those SUV deaths. Who's up today?"

"We settled the tire case for a large but confidential amount, enough to pay back six-figure expenses that I borrowed from the bank and put some money in my widow's purse. Hopefully, today is my payday. My experts say that Ford has at least equal responsibility, maybe greater. I'm crossing the Ford design engineer this morning."

Luke entered the courthouse, walked through a metal detector, and boarded the decrepit elevator that creaked and moaned its way to the sixth floor. When he stepped into the hall, he found it crowded with lawyers and clients. He smiled at two jurors and entered the courtroom.

Luke's client was seated on the back row, obviously deep in thought. "Morning, Nancy," he greeted her. "This should be the last witness. Good chance we can argue this afternoon." Pain shot over Luke's face, and he grabbed his stomach.

"Luke, you okay?"

"I'm fine. Just some indigestion. Happens a lot during trial. Let's get seated." Luke led the way to their counsel table.

"All rise."

Judge Ruby O'Reilly came through the back door as the jurors entered from the side.

"Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Mr. Vaughan, you may recall Mr. Alberson for cross-examination."

A slender, graying gentleman who could have been a college professor rose in the first row of the audience and made his way to the witness stand. He had done an excellent job the day before, establishing that the plaintiff's car had some risk of rolling over, but no more than any other SUV. He blamed the crash on a tire that had lost its tread after only twenty thousand miles. As to the roof design, which was a major issue in the case, it met every federal standard. Fred Ayers, Ford's lead lawyer, knew that he had some problems in the case, but was satisfied that Alberson had managed to handle all of them quite nicely.

"Mr. Alberson, you would agree that Ford markets these cars as SUVs that are safe and passenger friendly?" Luke asked.

"Yes, sir. I certainly would."

"You understand that we're not here to talk about tires?"

"Sorry, Mr. Vaughan, but I disagree." Alberson shook his head. "The jury has already heard that the accident was caused when the tire tread on the right front came completely off."

Several jurors had puzzled expressions, wondering why the tire manufacturer was not in the case. Of course, they didn't know that the Texas rules of evidence barred them from learning that the tire company had settled.

Luke put his hands in his pockets and walked away from the witness to stand at the rail behind his client. Switching gears to get away from a discussion about tires, he continued, "You know, don't you, that my client's husband died from a fractured skull, following the crash?"

"Mr. Vaughan, I'm very sorry for your client's loss," the professional witness said sympathetically.

"And you automotive engineers have to anticipate that a crash may happen. You've got to meet certain federal standards with regard to crashworthiness of various parts of the vehicle, including the roof."

"If that's a question, Mr. Vaughan, the answer is yes."

"Yet you folks at Ford twice reduced the roof strength on this vehicle to save a few bucks on each one, right, Mr. Alberson?"

"Mr. Vaughan, the roof was changed in an overall design overhaul. Money was not the issue," Alberson said, exasperation in his voice.

"Still, Mr. Alberson, the design of the car driven by my client's husband just barely met federal standards most of the time, and, allowing for manufacturing variance, some of the cars came off the assembly line with roofs that were below federal guidelines, true, sir?"

Alberson folded his arms and looked to his lawyers for some help, but they had their faces buried in documents. "Probably so."

"And those design changes saved Ford tens of millions of dollars that went to bottom line profit, right, Mr. Alberson?"

"Yes," the witness answered, but before he could explain his answer, Luke's legs buckled as he broke out into a sweat. He managed to take a seat before he collapsed. Judge O'Reilly saw his condition and called for an early morning recess.

As the jury left the courtroom, the bailiff rushed over to Luke. "What can I do, man?"

"I'll be okay in a minute. Just get me some water and that bottle of Maalox from my briefcase."

After a half hour Luke assured the judge that he could proceed and then, to her surprise and that of the defense lawyers, said that he had no more questions. The defense team sized up where they were and elected to rest, satisfied that Luke's cross had barely scratched the surface.

Luke had worked hard on his closing argument, even rehearsing it before his mirror three different times. He had been prepared, but not for what had just happened. He had no fire, no enthusiasm, no thunder. It was a bland and ineffective closing statement, causing a number of jurors to switch their attention from Luke to the minute hand on the clock on the back wall. Three hours after retiring, the jury returned a verdict in favor of Ford. Luke could only apologize to his client. At least he had recovered on the tire case. That would give Nancy enough to raise her children, but after the gigantic expenses of a fight against Ford, Luke knew there would be little left for his three years of work. Certainly not the big payday he had anticipated. Then he collapsed on the courtroom floor.

CHAPTER 3

Luke was wheeled on a stretcher from the ambulance into the emergency department of Memorial Hermann Hospital, conscious but in severe pain. After a cursory examination, the emergency physician admitted him to a medical unit. Over the next twenty-four hours, Luke was put through a battery of tests. Finally, Dr. Vincent Lee, a general surgeon, entered Luke's room for the first time. After introducing himself, he said, "Mr. Vaughan, all of our tests are conclusive. You have a perforated ulcer. Surgery is the only solution."

"Then let's get it over with." Luke nodded in agreement. "The sooner the better."

Lucas Vaughan had been born and raised in San Marcos, Texas, a college town perched on the edge of the Texas Hill Country about halfway between Austin and San Antonio. His father was a real estate agent who sold rural land suitable for second homes. His mother worked as a nurse in the community hospital. By the time he graduated from high school, he was six feet tall and pushed two hundred pounds. His undergraduate grades at the University of Texas were barely good enough to get him into UT Law School, where he graduated in the lower half of his class three years later.

Unlike those at the top of his class, he didn't have offers of summer internships with big firms, and no job offers came as he completed his senior year. When he graduated, he figured that Houston was the biggest city in the state and there had to be room for one more lawyer. After pounding the pavement for weeks, he moved in with a plaintiff personal injury lawyer who had billboards on most of the freeways. All he got was an office and a promise of cases that the billboard lawyer didn't want. Still, it was a start. He leased an efficiency apartment close to the office and learned to move the small cases with a minimum of expense. Within three years he was making a decent living and opened his own law firm, putting up a few of his own billboards. The cases produced enough fees to pay his landlord and his secretary and to live comfortably but not lavishly. He taught himself to try lawsuits. At first he was clumsy and ill prepared, but he eventually developed a reputation as a fender-bender lawyer who could try a very respectable case when the need arose.

He tried to find time for sports, even signing up for a flag football league one fall, but his trial schedule interfered. By the time he was in his early thirties, his weight had ballooned to well over two hundred pounds. One day he looked at himself in the mirror after a shower and was disgusted. He postponed work while he took a slow jog around the neighborhood. Thereafter, he squeezed forty-five minutes out of his hectic day for an early morning run, and the pounds disappeared in a year.

Luke really had very little interest in getting married and chose to have no serious girlfriends. There were a few one- night stands, but that was it. Then he made what turned out to be a colossal mistake. He had a few too many drinks on a Friday night at the Inns of Court Club in downtown Houston and picked up an eighteen-year-old waitress at closing. They had a few more drinks and ended up in his bed, where they had boozy sex. Three months later she called to tell him that she was pregnant and he was the father. Luke wasn't sure that she hadn't just chosen him from a number of lovers and anointed him as the father of her child, but he had no proof to the contrary. So he did what he considered the right thing and married Josie. Six months later they had a daughter they named Samantha.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Trial by Larry D. Thompson. Copyright © 2011 Larry D. Thompson. Excerpted by permission of St. Martin's Press.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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The Trial 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Ronrose1 on LibraryThing 3 days ago
Luke Vaughan gave up his fast track, ulcer causing career as a trial lawyer to start a small practice in his home town of San Marcos, Texas. When his teenage daughter, Samantha rebels at the lifestyle changes, Luke finds he has traded an ulcer for a major headache. Years of alienation follow until Samantha starts college. In order to make a few dollars, Sam signs up for a clinical drug trial of a major new medication being administered through a rather shady local doctor"s office. The drug is touted to be a promising rival to the current crop of antibiotics on the market. In a matter of weeks, Sam starts exhibiting signs of illness indicative of liver failure. As the symptoms rapidly worsen, Luke convinces Sam that they should sue the doctor and the drug company to recover enough money to pay for a liver transplant. What they don't know is that the drug company fronted by Dr. Kingsbury, is risking billions of dollars on this new drug and will stop at nothing, including bribing an official in the Food and Drug Administration, to see it succeed. Lies, bribery, threats, violence and perhaps worse are all options in his quest for success. The trial that ensues will test the limits of friendship and family for Luke and Samantha. I found the scenario interesting, even compelling. The small town lawyer fights the multinational drug company in order to get his dying daughter enough money to pay for a liver transplant. I thought the relationships as expressed through the dialog were weak at times. I didn't find any singular twists or surprises that would raise the story above an average courtroom suspense drama. The story was solid, but I just didn't feel it had the spark to make it exceptional. The book was provided for review by the author.
shearon on LibraryThing 3 days ago
Begin with a greedy pharmaceutical company. Add a sympathetic victim, her father-lawyer, a small town, a corrupt bureaucrat, a bombing, a murder, a kidnapping, some courtroom theatrics ¿ and middle aged guys on Harley-Davidsons ¿ and that¿s what you have in The Trial. Overall, a well-paced, attention maintaining, (modest) thriller, this novel is combination family drama (father and daughter somewhat estranged rediscover how much they respect and love each other) and David and Goliath (big pharma pushes very profitable antibiotic despite clear evidence of its danger and small town lawyer takes them on). Good and justice prevail. A little more editing, especially in some of the dialogue, would improve the flow, but overall, it works fine.A John Grisham page-turner this is not, but it is entertaining and engrossing. Clear from the get-go what the end result has to be, it keeps the reader engaged with a few twists and turns and more detail on the litigation process than customary. Thanks to the author, and Library Thing Member Giveaway for the chance to read and review this book.
polarbear123 on LibraryThing 3 days ago
A courtroom drama here, The Trial concerns a case between a small town lawyer who defends his daughter against a powerful drugs company. The scene is set well with an opening prologue detailing two incidents integral to the plot. We are then transported back in time to learn about the main characters. Chapters follow both the lawyer and his daughter and running parallel to those we have the chapters about the pharmaceutical company and its drug production and tests. This background continues for half the book until the two strands meet each other and then the rest of the book concerns the resulting courtroom clash.The writing is concise and fluid with decent dialogue and the author certainly knows his way around the American courtroom system- I learned a lot about this. The plot is predictable although this does not detract from the enjoyment of the story.I would have liked the characters to have a little more depth to them and to not perhaps be so black and white, good or evil. It also seemed that the case was always a foregone conclusion and there are some out of character collapses of testimony in the witness stand towards the very end of the book. I read this book over two days and I did enjoy it there is no doubt about it. It was however like watching a tv courtroom drama movie on a Sunday afternoon. Tell me the name of the film and I will tell you the plot line. Predictable but well written nonetheless. Many thanks to the author for providing me with a free copy.
halo776 on LibraryThing 3 days ago
The stress of being a Houston trial lawyer is getting to Luke Vaughn, so he decides a lifestyle change is in order. He and his teenage daughter, Samantha, move to his hometown of San Marcos, Texas. There, he works in an office at home, mainly on wills and contracts. He develops a romantic interest with a girl from his school days, and his relationship with his daughter improves dramatically. Small-town life seems to agree with the pair until Samantha gets sick. She's diagnosed with hepatitis as a result of a clinical trial she participated in for money. When Luke gets the news that she needs a new liver, he decides to sue the pharmaceutical company for enough money to pay for Samantha's care. With each passing day, Luke and his team (which includes his girlfriend and an eccentric history professor, Whizmo)uncover more and more dark secrets about Ceventa, the pharmaceutical giant that produced the drug. The plot includes murder-for-hire, kidnapping, payoffs to the FDA, and other twists and turns that will keep you reading late into the night.It's hard to read this book and not compare it to John Grisham. The small-town trial lawyer who goes up against a big-city firm is a common theme. What makes this book so outstanding are (1)the characters, and (2)the suspense. Larry Thompson has gathered an interesting group of characters who are so real, it's hard not to become absorbed in their story. Whizmo is unforgettable, and the kind of history professor I wish I'd had. As Samantha's condition deteriorates, it is described in such detail (particularly the scene where the doctor has to remove fluid from her abdomen) that as a reader, you now have a vested interest in the trial's outcome.The conclusion (for both the trial and the novel) comes as no surprise, but all the same it is satisfying. I fell in love with these characters and would gladly read another story about a father-daughter practice involving these same characters (hint hint, Mr. Thompson?).
txwildflower on LibraryThing 3 days ago
When the daughter of a lawyer falls ill with liver failure they realize the problem stems from a powerful drug study she participated in and was covered up by the drug company and the FDA. Her father decides to take on the drug company and get the drug off the market before more people become sick or die. This book will make you understand how corrupt the drug companies are and to what lengths they will go to make money off new drugs they are trying to push on the public. How they pay doctors to promote these new drugs and then make millions of dollars off of them. This book will make you think!
plunkinberry on LibraryThing 3 days ago
At first, I wasn¿t sure what to make of this book and I don¿t regularly read stories about lawyers and trials, but this one was good. This book was similar to a Grisham novel. I enjoyed the characters and the plot was quite good. It went right down to the wire as to which way the outcome was going to go. It was a compelling, fast-moving story that I got emotionally involved in without realizing it. It could have involved more romance or sex, but it wasn't necessary; it could have involved more action and physical drama, but that wasn't necessary either. Mr. Thompson is an author I will keep my eye open for in the future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Predictable,thin plot and poorly told.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ronrose More than 1 year ago
Luke Vaughan gave up his fast track, ulcer causing career as a trial lawyer to start a small practice in his home town of San Marcos, Texas. When his teenage daughter, Samantha rebels at the lifestyle changes, Luke finds he has traded an ulcer for a major headache. Years of alienation follow until Samantha starts college. In order to make a few dollars, Sam signs up for a clinical drug trial of a major new medication being administered through a rather shady local doctor"s office. The drug is touted to be a promising rival to the current crop of antibiotics on the market. In a matter of weeks, Sam starts exhibiting signs of illness indicative of liver failure. As the symptoms rapidly worsen, Luke convinces Sam that they should sue the doctor and the drug company to recover enough money to pay for a liver transplant. What they don't know is that the drug company fronted by Dr. Kingsbury, is risking billions of dollars on this new drug and will stop at nothing, including bribing an official in the Food and Drug Administration, to see it succeed. Lies, bribery, threats, violence and perhaps worse are all options in his quest for success. The trial that ensues will test the limits of friendship and family for Luke and Samantha. I found the scenario interesting, even compelling. The small town lawyer fights the multinational drug company in order to get his dying daughter enough money to pay for a liver transplant. I thought the relationships as expressed through the dialog were weak at times. I didn't find any singular twists or surprises that would raise the story above an average courtroom suspense drama. The story was solid, but I just didn't feel it had the spark to make it exceptional. The book was provided for review by the author.
Brockakers More than 1 year ago
This is a very exciting, interesting legal thriller that had me on the edge of my seat, and on occasion a tear in my eye. It is written by a real trial lawyer, and that shows. Too often, books in this genre are written by people who have little to no experience in the trenches. Larry Thompson is just the opposite--an accomplished and highly respected trial lawyer with a knack for capturing the reality of the drama in a civil lawsuit. What this well crafted book shows is that one does not need to invent phoney structures to make the story flow. The reality of what really happens is exciting enough. And Thompson aptly describes the unique goings on at the rural Texas county courthouse. In so doing, he tells a tale with developed characters that is well worth the time. This is a delightful book, that I highly recommend.
Reepijoy More than 1 year ago
This book is a very suspenseful legal thriller. Small town lawyer takes on giant drug company when his daughter develops a fatal condition due to being a subject of a clinical drug trial. How far would you go to save your child? Though the writing was stilted at times I could not put the book down. I can see this novel becoming a blockbuster movie. Great book for a first time author! If I ever need an attorney, I'd want Vaughn!
Vail-Book-Reviewer More than 1 year ago
Larry Thompson out-does himself again. Once you get into this book time will fly and you won't want to stop until you've finished it. It held my attention throughout and am already looking forward to Thompson's next book.
PennyTerk More than 1 year ago
THE TRIAL, by Larry D. Thompson, is a wonderful read... and very timely, indeed! With all the testing shenanigans being pulled by the drug companies, it seems we should all be questioning some of the drugs being prescribed today. Larry is not only a great writer (it is in his DNA!), but he is also a trial attorney who often is involved in medical related lawsuits. He KNOWS his subject well and he brings to life a story so relevant that it seems it could happen to any of us! After reading his previous novel, SO HELP ME GOD, I could not wait to get my hands on his latest book, THE TRIAL. Get it! Read it! You will then be another of his growing number of fans who can't wait for his next book. Remember this author's name! He is gonna be famous.. SOON!
RexSpivey More than 1 year ago
A new and exciting treatment of the pharmaceutical industry, its government watch-dogs and big-league crime. All combined with compelling characters and an intricate and compelling plot. Keeps you sweating to the end.
Dexter_Stone More than 1 year ago
Totally riveting, couldn't put it down.
CET777 More than 1 year ago
The characters become part of your family. The drama is real life, NWO timely. The court room is written as only an outstanding attorney with a lifetime of experience can write it. Having read So Help Me God by Larry Thompson, I see he is adept at increasing the pace with every page, kind of like our lives with each passing day. Be ready to go for a speed ride through the dramatic events demonstrative of our current world.
CaseySollock More than 1 year ago
The Trial is a fun ride that shouldn't be missed by anyone! Thompson knows the courtroom like the back of his hand and engages the reader in high drama and suspense! You will connect with each and every character in this book as each page comes alive. Get this book and enjoy every minute! Start it when you have some free time because you won't be able to put it down. Enjoy!
Vermontcozy More than 1 year ago
Attorney Luke Vaughn..Texas Born and now back in his hometown. Setting up a small Practice..in his home..Which he share's with his teenage daughter Samantha,,,Life takes an unexpected turn..Luke finds himself up against a Global Pharmaceutical Co...Larry Thompson was able to put me... in the courtroom..He never wasted a word or a sentence in this disturbing case...Armed with an amazing amount of evidence.that The High Powered Cosmopolitan Lawyers.could not phathom...We see Luke..calm composed..A True Southern Gentleman..Fighting for his daughters life,,I look forward to more by Larry D.Thompson...I would like a series,,of course..Surely Mr.Thompson has other untold stories.Excellent Character Development as well..Susan..
harstan More than 1 year ago
Teenager Samantha Vaughn learns that her liver is failing at the same time someone murders an executive with incriminating disks. Samantha's father, former Houston lawyer Luke Vaughn, is shocked with his nineteen years old daughter's illness as liver problems do not run in the family and she was okay recently. The single dad who just returned home to San Marcos due to a perforated ulcer finds out the cause of her failing health is a trial test of a new antibiotic Exxacia that she was given. Learning more and concluding there was fraud by the firm and a cover-up by the FDA occurred. Raging over what he believes is potentially lethal negligence; Luke sues the giant Ceventa Pharmaceutical and its CEO Dr. Alfred Kingsbury, and goes after the FDA especially the Director Dr. Roger Boatwright for failing to protect the public. However, Luke never expected murder and abduction as the reaction by the enemy. This is an exciting medical-legal thriller that grips the audience from the moment Samantha asks Dr. Hartman whether she will live to see her twentieth birthday and never slows down. The story line is fast-paced and at its best when the focus is on the FDA-pharmaceutical industry symbiotic relationship and in the court room; when the plot turns to homicides and abduction, it loses steam as that feels over the top of Guadalupe Peak. Still in spite of a post game coda that feels out of place and the homicidal subplot, overall fans will enjoy the doubly apt titled The Trial. Harriet Klausner