Triburbia

Triburbia

by Karl Taro Greenfeld
3.7 6

NOOK Book(eBook)

$6.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

Triburbia by Karl Taro Greenfeld

Karl Taro Greenfeld, author of the acclaimed memoir Boy Alone, delivers a stylish first novel about a group of families in a fashionable Manhattan neighborhood wrestling with the dark realities of their lives.

A book reminiscent of Tom Rachman’s The Imperfectionists and Jennifer Egan’s A Visit from the Goon Squad, Greenfeld’s Triburbia is a bold literary tour de force in which the author renders New York City’s vibrant and affluent Tribeca neighborhood as a living breathing, character, much like Armistead Maupin did with San Francisco in his acclaimed Tales of the City. Winner of the PEN/O Henry Prize, Greenfeld dazzles as a debut novelist, marking the beginning of a brilliant career in long-form literary fiction.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062132413
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 07/31/2012
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 1,020,115
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Karl Taro Greenfeld is the author of seven previous books, including the novel Triburbia and the acclaimed memoir Boy Alone. His award-winning writing has appeared in Harper's Magazine, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Best American Short Stories 2009 and 2013, and The PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2012. Born in Kobe, Japan, he has lived in Paris, Hong Kong, and Tokyo, and currently lives in Pacific Palisades, California, with his wife, Silka, and their daughters, Esmee and Lola.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Triburbia: A Novel 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
mshoni More than 1 year ago
Triburbia is another one of those novels set in the rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods of New York City where the incoming hipster set sometimes clashes with the "natives". Usually they feature latte-sipping, stroller-pushing, organic food-eating mothers lamenting the loss of their youth, careers, and independence. All of that appears here also, except the main characters are men. A group of men with seemingly nothing in common form a sort of bond when they see each other everyday dropping off their children at school. They get together for breakfast afterwards in a coffee shop mainly for the companionship since most of the men are self-employed. Even though they go through this daily ritual, we get the feeling that they really don't know each other well despite their need for this connection. Told in the form of connected short stories (a popular tool in this genre), we see inside the lives of these men and the people around them that they are hesitant to share with each other. I don't read a lot of literary fiction that center around men, so it was interesting to get insight into the various insecurities that these men carry.
Chowbell More than 1 year ago
I found this book very entertaining, and I found it a fun, fast read. I recommend it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago