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Tropic Moon
     

Tropic Moon

4.7 12
by Georges Simenon, Norman Rush, Marc Romano
 

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Newly translated for this edition.

A young Frenchman, Joseph Timar, travels to Gabon carrying a letter of introduction from an influential uncle. He wants work experience; he wants to see the world. But in the oppressive heat and glare of the equator, Timar doesn’t know what to do with himself, and no one seems inclined to help except Adèle, the

Overview

Newly translated for this edition.

A young Frenchman, Joseph Timar, travels to Gabon carrying a letter of introduction from an influential uncle. He wants work experience; he wants to see the world. But in the oppressive heat and glare of the equator, Timar doesn’t know what to do with himself, and no one seems inclined to help except Adèle, the hotel owner’s wife, who takes him to bed one day and rebuffs him the next, leaving him sick with desire. But then, in the course of a single night, Adèle’s husband dies and a black servant is shot, and Timar is sure that Adèle is involved. He’ll cover for the crime if she’ll do what he wants. The fix is in. But Timar can’t even begin to imagine how deep.

In Tropic Moon, Simenon, the master of the psychological novel, offers an incomparable picture of degeneracy and corruption in a colonial outpost.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Attention should be paid to the New York Review of Books' continuing reissues of Georges Simenon. Simenon was legendary both for his literary skill–four or five books every year for 40 years–and his sexual capacity, at least to hear him tell it. What we can speak of with some certainty are the novels, which are tough, rigorously unsentimental and full of rage, duplicity and, occasionally, justice. Simenon's tone and dispassionate examination of humanity was echoed by Patricia Highsmith, who dispensed with the justice. So far, the Review has published Tropic Moon, The Man Who Watched Trains Go By, Red Lights, Dirty Snow and Three Bedrooms in Manhattan; The Strangers in the House comes out in November. Try one, and you'll want to read more.”
The Palm Beach Post

"These three roman durs, and the ones that will follow them, including the insouciantly gruesome The Man Who Watched the Trains Go By, another tale of a husband on the run, and Tropic Moon, a frightening study of lust and violence in the Belgian Congo, are superb and polished works of art masquerading as pulp fiction."
— John Banville, The New Republic

“A sleek, feverish read, perfect for a summer afternoon indoors, all the windows open wide and the fans on high.” —Open Letters Monthly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590175620
Publisher:
New York Review Books
Publication date:
11/23/2011
Series:
NYRB Classics Series
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
152
Sales rank:
617,556
File size:
276 KB

Meet the Author

Georges Simenon (1903–1989) was born in Liège, Belgium. He went to work as a reporter at the age of fifteen and in 1923 moved to Paris, where under various pseudonyms he became a highly successful and prolific author of pulp fiction while leading a dazzling social life. In the early 1930s, Simenon emerged as a writer under his own name, gaining renown for his detective stories featuring Inspector Maigret. He also began to write his psychological novels, or romans durs—books in which he displays a sympathetic awareness of the emotional and spiritual pain underlying the routines of daily life. Having written nearly two hundred books under his own name and become the best-selling author in the world, Simenon retired as a novelist in 1973, devoting himself instead to dictating several volumes of memoirs.

Norman Rush was raised in Oakland, California, and graduated from Swarthmore College in 1956. He has been an antiquarian book dealer, a college instructor, and, with his wife Elsa, he lived and worked in Africa from 1978 to 1983. They now reside in Rockland County, New York. His stories have appeared in The New YorkerThe Paris Review, and Best American Short Stories.Whites, a collection of stories, was published in 1986, and his first novel, Mating, the recipient of the National Book Award, was published in 1991. Mortals is his second novel.

Marc Romano is a writer living in New York City. He has translated two other novels by Georges Simenon, both published by New York Review BooksDirty Snow (with Louise Varèse) and Three Bedrooms in Manhattan (with Lawrence G. Blochman).

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Tropic Moon 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading Paul Theroux's great travel book "Ghost Train the Eastern Star " and noticed that he put a stack of George Simenon books in his backpack for the long trip. I don't think there could be a better recommendation than that! I plan to read many more Simenon novels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Thank you, Moon." Stardust said, then started to graze.|~•Stardust•~|
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The books were kind of ironic, being about boring books and all. I mentioned this to tom and he laughed. Maybe i could be friends with someone here, i thought. Then tom told it to emily and maddy and they both smiled at the truth. One kid who overheard this raised his hand and when mr.mark called on him he told him the exact same thing. After class, that boy had a detention slip to carry around for the rest of the day. Our next class was weapons and health, and everybody was excited to get to move around for once. Here on the decker, there is no recess time in the day, or any kind of big open space to move around. Until now. We came up to a door that had two words printed in bright dripping red. ENTER = WORK. We entered, preparing for something to happen that would requre work, and our precautions paid off. Just as maddy, who was at the head of the group, started to take another step, the floor slid out underneath her dropping foot. She let out a yelp and flaled her arms as she started to fall into the darkness of the outside asteroid belt. I lept forward and caught her arm just as she was about to topple over into nothingess. Then tom and emily gabe me a hand and helped her back up to safe ground. Thanks, i almost fell. Thank you alot, maddy had told me. I blushed and waved it off, saying it wa nothing. But i knew it was something. I had saved a life. First try. After all, there ar no second trys for that kind of stuff. As we peered over the edge into the open space we heard running footsteps coming closer. I whirled around to see a kid who was late for class after using the bathroom run straight of the edge, a look of surprise on his face as he toppled down into space. Next part coming! Darksunstar
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I cant rp here anymore. I dont come on often, and im rly busy. Good bye everyone. ~Purity
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Shivers slighty as the storm outside rages on
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She grazed
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Heyo!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She jerked up her head.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Dragon sighes and loooks for someone to talk to. She sees the new stallion. She walks over. "Hello. Where did you come from?" Jay whinnies and prances in a circle. He then looks up at the mare who approached. Purity. "Yeah! He is hanging with us stallions!" He puffs his chest out. Heaven tilts her head. "No name?"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
IM A PONY