Truly Understood

Truly Understood

by Christopher Peacocke

Paperback

$39.95
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Want it by Wednesday, October 24  Order now and choose Expedited Shipping during checkout.

Overview

Truly Understood by Christopher Peacocke

In Truly Understood, Christopher Peacocke argues that truth and reference have a much deeper role in the explanation of meaning and understanding than has hitherto been appreciated. Examination of specific concepts shows that a grasp of these concepts has to be characterized in terms of reference, identity, and relations to the world. Peacocke develops a positive general theory of understanding based on the idea that concepts are individuated by their fundamental reference rules, which contrasts sharply with conceptual-role, inferentialist, and pragmatist approaches to meaning. He treats thought about the material world, about places and times, and about the self within the framework of this general account, and extends the theory to explain the normative dimensions of content, which he believes are founded in the network of connections between concepts and the level of reference and truth. In the second part of the book, Peacocke explores the application of this account to some problematic mental phenomena, including the conception of many subjects of experience, concepts of conscious states, mental action, and our ability to think about the contents of our own and others' mental states.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780199581979
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date: 06/06/2010
Pages: 360
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Christopher Peacocke is Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and Wollheim Professor of Philosophy at University College London.

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction
Acknowledgments and Sources
Part I: A Theory of Understanding
1. Truth's Role in Understanding
2. Reference and Reasons
3. The First Person as a Case Study
4. Implicit Conceptions
Part II: Applications to Mental Concepts
5. Conceiving of Conscious States
6. 'Another I': Representing Perception and Action
7. Mental Action
8. Representing Thoughts
Conclusion

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews