Truth, Lies, and O-Rings: Inside the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster

Truth, Lies, and O-Rings: Inside the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster

by Allan J McDonald, James R. Hansen
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Truth, Lies, and O-Rings: Inside the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
DrMWB More than 1 year ago
For three years in the 1970's Mr McDonald was my manager in Thiokol's propellant development department. Mr. McDonald was well respected as an engineer but those of us who were propellant development chemists (many PhD's) first reaction was "What the heck does he know about propellants?" We soon found out that he knew plenty and what he did not know, he learned fast. When I found out that his book had been published, I drove 80 miles (round trip) to buy a copy and finished reading it in 2 days. I was well rewarded for the effort. Al managed to combine the elements of a political thriller, a treatise an solid rocket motors, and a case study on professional ethics into one book. Although I left Thiokol's employ before the tragedy of the Challenger, I had contacts at my former employer and elsewhere in the rocket industry that kept me informed of the inside story. Everthing in the book is consistent with that which I was able to uncover. Make no mistake the technical material is "heavy duty". However one can still enjoy the book by just skipping over it. Now as to some criticisms. It was true that Roger Boisjoly and Al were treated like lepers not only by their management but also the rank and file. For management their is no sympathy but for the rank and file he does not point out that they were petrified that he might have cost them all their jobs. I also feel that he was unnecessarily harsh on one of his fellow engineers, Jack Kapp. I knew Mr. Kapp (deceased) albeit not well and did know that he enjoyed a stellar reputation both professionally and in the community. His funeral was attended by more than 400 people. I believe that his comments detailed by Al on pp 288-9 were made to rally the troops not for self-aggrandizement as implied by the author. Finally, I wish Al had included a chapter entitled "What to do if you have to blow the whistle". Not all of us have powerful congressional friends. It is unfortunately true that the "average" whistle blower ends up on the scrap heap of the unemployed and usually branded with a "S" for snitch. This is powerful inducement to keep ones mouth shut. My criticisms aside, this is a terrific book. You won't be sorry you spent the money, time and effort to read it.
EvKH More than 1 year ago
This may be the most accurate book I have ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
McDonald's book is hard to put down once you start reading. It is the first written on Challenger by an involved person, an insider. Exhaustive details from the thorough notes he kept are presented. There are numerous lessons to be learned from his experience, which hopefully, will prevent future disasters in space. The details of how bureaucracies can screw up and cover up serve as an alert to those currently working in this field. It is a "must read" for everyone in the space launch or rocket business.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Picks up the hare and takes it to camp.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book i had to read. For one, i love the shuttle program and i found the topic interesting, and second it was written by one of my grandparent's close friends. He was staying with them when this all occurred and they are mentioned a few times in the book/
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago