Tuck (King Raven Trilogy Series #3)

Tuck (King Raven Trilogy Series #3)

by Stephen R. Lawhead
4.2 119

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Tuck (King Raven Trilogy Series #3) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 119 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In the late eleventh century they fled to the forests of the March from the invaders who routed Rhi Bran y Hud and his loyal Grellen fighters from their home Elfael; William the Conqueror gave their land to Abbot Hugo. Although the forest outlaws have become a powerful force due to their skill with the longbow inside the dense forest, they know they are losing the war outside the March. Hugo accompanied by traitorous Guy of Gysburne and their ferocious Ffreinc barbarians assault Bran¿s subjects with a brutality never seen before as women and children are expendable to this ruthless horde.

Robin and the Grellen feel helpless while their loved ones are being butchered. They know they must confront a much more powerful enemy not as outlaws hiding behind trees in the forest, but as a freedom fighting force. Bran has strong allies like Will Scarlet the forester, Angharad the seer, Merian the warrior and especially the diabolical Friar Tuck. Leaving Will and the seer behind with the Grellen inside the March to continue the guerilla tactics, Bran and Tuck leave the forest to rally the collapsing Ffreinc forces under the rallying cry of the return of the heir. At the same time Lady Merian learns her father is dead and her brother is a puppet married to the enemy. Their efforts look even more hopeless than when they started the end game.

The final tale of the King Raven trilogy (see SCARLET and HOOD) is a terrific finish to a great retelling of the Robin Hood legend. The story line is fast-paced keeping the sense of desperate franticness that the heroes face while their people are being butchered. Fans of the saga will relish Stephen R. Lawhead¿s excellent rendition but should first read the previous books to obtain a better understanding of what inspires Bran and his loyal teammates to keep on going though they are dispirited and confronting overwhelming odds to become living legends instead of dead outlaws; as even the myths are written by the victors.

Harriet Klausner
emmi331 More than 1 year ago
Stephen Lawhead wraps up his Robin Hood saga masterfully in this final installment. Bran and his men (and women) continue to fight valiantly for Bran's kingship, from the Welsh greenwood which hides them to the King's Road. As in earlier books, the band must rely not only on their deadly longbows, but on quick wits and inventiveness. As the title suggests, in this part of the tale Friar Tuck plays a crucial role. An epilogue and author's notes at the end enrich the reader's understanding of how this legend grew. Not to be missed by readers who loved the first two books!
LN_Adcox More than 1 year ago
Lawhead brings new twists to the Robin Hood legend in this trilogy by making Robin Hood or Bran ap Brychan heir to the Welsh cantref Elfael. This twist is not without irony as the remnant of the original Britons had been driven into Wales and Normandy by invading Saxons long before the Norman invasion. Incidentally, this is one of those books that are more historical fiction than science fiction and fantasy but you will find it under the latter heading simply due to the reputation of the author. Norman invaders kill Bran's father and his father's war band and take possession of Elfael. Bran's enemies in "Tuck" are the very unholy Abbot Hugo and his minions Sheriff de Glanville and Marshal Guy of Gysburne and the treacherous English King William Rufus. The first two books of the series, "Hood" and "Scarlet" , introduced us to Iwan (or "Little John" as he was called by Friar Aethelfrith), Friar Tuck (as he was called by Iwan), Merian, Will Scarlet, and the wise and ancient bard, Angharad. They also introduced us to the Raven King - the dark birdman phantom created by Bran to terrify the Normans. "Tuck" continues to illustrate how such legends spread widely, grab the imagination of the local population and serve to unify their opposition. I waited with great anticipation for this third book of the series and was initially disappointed. "Tuck" lacked the freshness of "Hood" and the novelty of Will Scarlet telling his story from prison to the naïve and simple monk Odo in "Scarlet". King Raven was less active, and the villains seemed less villainous in this third book. The scope also seemed smaller as Bran's war band seemed to have shrunk to a very small scale - half a dozen archers against no more than a couple score of Norman knights. However, the scope widens as "Red William", the English King, leads an army through the Marsh to make an example of the unruly Welsh. Friar Tuck also earns the right to have his name on the final book of the series. The ending serves to explain how the legend of Robin Hood spread from the Welsh roots Lawhead gives it and ties up all the loose ends in a very satisfying manner.
Anonymous 7 months ago
See above
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Good read.Believable and entertaining. The author sets the legend in Wales based on research he has done into the Robib Hood legends.
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R_Lythgoe More than 1 year ago
My curiosity was piqued when I discovered this was set in the Welsh borderlands and in an earlier time period than we are accustomed to, but Lawhead's notes make perfect sense of his choice. The people in the book are wonderfully characterized, particularly Robin/Bran, who starts out as a spoiled, spineless annoyance. The book moved along at a good pace most of the time, and I was not put off by the slower parts. I found the details surrounding who was in charge (William Rufus) and what was going on (the Franks in Wales) a little confusing, as though it was assumed that this was information everyone automatically knows. While the author's notes at the end clarified, I wish I'd read them first. Even so, I already bought 'Scarlet,' the second book in the series.
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