Tudors Versus Stewarts: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary, Queen of Scots

Tudors Versus Stewarts: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary, Queen of Scots

by Linda Porter
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Overview

Tudors Versus Stewarts: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary, Queen of Scots by Linda Porter

The war between the fertile Stewarts and the barren Tudors was crucial to the history of the British Isles in the sixteenth century. The legendary struggle, most famously embodied by the relationship between Elizabeth I and her cousin, Mary Queen of Scots, was fuelled by three generations of powerful Tudor and Stewart monarchs. It was the marriage of Margaret Tudor, elder sister of Henry VIII, to James IV of Scotland in 1503 that gave the Tudors a claim to the English throne—a claim which became the acknowledged ambition of Mary Queen of Scots and a major factor in her downfall.

Here is the story of divided families, of flamboyant kings and queens, cultured courts and tribal hatreds, blood feuds, rape and sexual license, of battles and violent deaths. It brings alive a neglected aspect of British history—the blood-spattered steps of two small countries on the northern fringes of Europe towards the union of their crowns. Beginning with the dramatic victories of two usurpers, Henry VII in England and James IV in Scotland, in the late fifteenth century, Linda Porter's Tudors Versus Stewarts sheds new light on Henry VIII, his daughter Elizabeth I and on his great-niece, Mary Queen of Scots, still seductive more than 400 years after her death.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781466842724
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Publication date: 07/01/2014
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 544
Sales rank: 163,170
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Linda Porter has a Ph.D. in history from the University of York, England. She was the winner of the 2004 Biographers Club/Daily Mail prize in England and is the author of The Myth of "Bloody Mary", also available from St. Martin's Press. She is married with one daughter and lives near London.


Linda Porter has a doctorate in history from the University of York, England. She was the winner of the 2004 Biographers Club/Daily Mail Prize in England and is the author of The Myth of “Bloody Mary,” and Katherine the Queen: The Remarkable Life of Katherine Parr, the Last Wife of Henry VIII. She is married with one daughter and lives near London.

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Tudors Versus Stewarts: The Fatal Inheritance of Mary, Queen of Scots 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books that havd come out this year. Linda Porter includes everything from the politics to the violent backgrounds and religious factors that molded each character and also interest facts about, in this case for me since I had not read a lot on the Stuarts, on James IV, James V and Mary Queen of Scots. She was the Tudor era Tomboy and not Elizabeth and like her grandfather James IV, she was an expert needlewoman. James V was the less educated of all these three Stuart monarchs but this was not his fault when hsi mother's second husband, Angus and yman others had kidnapped him or tried to use him against her or for her so their families could become powerful. He spent stmo of hks life seeing his country torn apart by factions and lived a nomadic life, moved palace from palace. But he became one of the best kings in this period and it is only unfortunate that he died of illness following Solway Moss. Like his father, he spent a lit no building palaces, expanding his old ones, remodeling them and mkre than any other king during this tine, he had an intimate connection with his people as he would constantly go on progresses and stop to greet the commons. Under him a lot of artists and acholars found patronage and Scotland became well known as a center of culture. The great pioneer was his father who was a lover of chivalry and intellectual works and poems (which he often used to impress James V mother, Margaret Tudor) but James V expanded on that. The author doesn't forget the Tudors. There is equal amount spent on them as on their rivals, the Stuarts and explains the origins of their complicated relationship with their Northern neighbor, and how each Tudor handled that relationship.