×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Twenty Year Blues
     

Twenty Year Blues

5.0 1
by The Nashville Bluegrass Band
 
Twenty Year Blues marks the 20th anniversary of the Nashville Bluegrass Band, and they're still at the top of their game. The sound is pure bluegrass, but they aren't afraid to stray from tradition, and remain one of the only bluegrass bands to incorporate songs from the black

Overview

Twenty Year Blues marks the 20th anniversary of the Nashville Bluegrass Band, and they're still at the top of their game. The sound is pure bluegrass, but they aren't afraid to stray from tradition, and remain one of the only bluegrass bands to incorporate songs from the black string band tradition as well as black gospel music. Traditional tunes and Bill Monroe tunes sit very nicely with their covers of "Travelin' Railroad Man Blues" and "Sitting On Top of the World," both old string band songs, originally performed by the Alabama Sheiks and the Mississippi Sheiks, respectively, in the '30s. They also do a fine vocal gospel version of "Hush (Somebody's Callin' My Name)," which goes back to the '20s in a recording by the Wiseman Sextette. Then they turn around and cover "Luckiest Man Alive," which talks about the Vietnam War (not common bluegrass subject matter). They know the tradition, and understand how to expand it without ruffling any purist feathers. The playing is stellar, as would be expected from these longtime session men, and their close harmony singing is wonderful. Here's to another 20 years.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/10/2004
Label:
Sugarhill
UPC:
0015891395920
catalogNumber:
3959
Rank:
103678

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Nashville Bluegrass Band   Primary Artist
Mike Compton   Mandolin,Vocals,Baritone (Vocal),Group Member
Dennis Crouch   Bass,Group Member
Stuart Duncan   Fiddle,Vocals,Baritone (Vocal),Tenor (Vocal),Group Member
Pat Enright   Guitar,Vocals,Tenor (Vocal),Group Member
Alan O'Bryant   Banjo,Bass (Vocal),Vocals,Baritone (Vocal),Group Member

Technical Credits

Bill Monroe   Composer
Nashville Bluegrass Band   Producer,Audio Production
John Hartford   Composer
Bill Carlisle   Composer
Mike Compton   Composer
Shelly Lee Alley   Composer
Dennis Crouch   Personal Assistant
Tim Roberts   Engineer
Autry Inman   Composer
Lonnie Glosson   Composer
Bill Dale   Composer
Traditional   Composer
Niall Toner   Composer
Don Poythress   Composer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Twenty Year Blues 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Playing Time – 41:59 -- Calling this project “Twenty Year Blues,” the Nashville Bluegrass Band celebrates two decades picking extraordinary bluegrass that has garnered them IBMA Awards for Vocal Group of the Year (multiple times), Entertainer of the Year, and Song of the Year. Banjo-player Alan O’Bryant actually started his professional music career a decade earlier in 1974 with James Monroe, while co-founder and guitarist Pat Enright had previously performed with Tasty Licks (from New England) and Phantoms of the Opry (from San Francisco). A fateful day in 1984 brought these two together to launch the Nashville Bluegrass Band. The band’s current configuration still includes fiddler Stuart Duncan, seventime winner of the IBMA Fiddler of the Year Award. The band’s original mandolinist, Mike Compton, returned to the group in 2001, and he reinvigorates the band’s sound with his solid picking and vocals (singing lead on three cuts, and baritone on another). Compton also composed the fiery instrumental, “Pretty Red Lips.” A new addition to the band is talented bassist Dennis Crouch. A few other 20-year highlights in the Nashville Bluegrass Band’s history include Grammy awards, touring to Red China, touring with Lyle Lovett, recording with actress/singer Bernadette Peters, performing on a soundtrack with Johnny Cash, Enright’s yodeling being featured in the “O Brother Where Aart Thou” movie, and touring as part of the high-profile Down From The Mountain and Great High Mountain tours. “Twenty Year Blues” is really much more of a cause for joyous celebration than it is any cause to be sorrowful or sad, a theme found in many of the songs presented. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)