Two Moon Princess

Two Moon Princess

by Carmen Ferreiro-Esteban

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781515095286
Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date: 09/21/2007
Pages: 302
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.68(d)
Age Range: 12 - 18 Years

About the Author

CARMEN FERREIRO-ESTEBAN was born in Galicia (Northern Spain), a land of rolling hills and green valleys lulled by the ocean, that was thought in medieval times to be 'Finisterre,' the place where the world came to an end.
After completing her Ph.D. in Biology in Madrid, she lived in California for four years before returning to Spain. She now lives in Pennsylvania as a Science writer and translator.
Like all first books, Two Moon Princess, is autobiographical, but for the medieval setting, the magical cave, and the two moons. It was first published by Tanglewood Press in 2007. She is also the author of Immortal Love, a paranormal romantic story.

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Two Moon Princess 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
summerskris on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Like many girls, Andrea doesn't want to act like a girly girl. She yearns to be a knight whereas her parents expect her to act like the fourth princess that she is. It is when she crosses over to our world that she finally feels as though she is somewhere she belongs; only, she returns too early and to a home more unfamiliar to her than before, for her actions have become the catalyst for war.The characters aren't all nice. There are many misunderstandings that could have been resolved if only characters opened up and said what was really on their mind; however, real life isn't easy. When I became frustrated with characters, I asked myself how I would have acted in their positions, and I couldn't hate them as much as I wanted. There is romance. It is sweet; it is bitter. Andreas has her heart broken a couple times.Two Moon Princess is a coming-of-age story. It is unique and intriguing. It is about growing out of childhood dreams and realizing who you really want to become. War opens Andrea to the brutal reality of knighthood, and she learns more about what she wants to do with her life over the course of the novel. I recommend this for tweens, who will be able to relate to Andrea's struggles relating to her self-identity and getting the people around her to see her for who she really is.
Andreat78 on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Two Moon Princess is the story of Andrea, a princess in an alternate world, who longs to break free from the confines of the royal life. If I understand correctly, the people of Andrea's world are the ancestors of the Spanish people. I found the fact that Andrea is, for all intents and purposes, a Latina heroine, to be a nice change. As there are far too few Latina main characters in most of the books I read. Two Moon Princess got off to a fairly slow start for me. I found the description of the daily life of a princess to be a little boring. But as the interaction between the two worlds increases, so did my interest. The author did a great job of portraying the confusion Andrea feels as she experienced the modern world. Imagine not knowing what a watch or television are. The confusion was portrayed well. I have to admit, Andrea was the only character who appealed to me at all throughout the first two-thirds of the book. Her parents were distant. Two of her sisters were sweet but rarely used in the story. The other sister was cruel, almost beyond redemption. The man who Andrea thinks she loves in the first half of the book is clueless. But, this book was redeemed by the last 100 pages. Andrea becomes a strong, worthwhile hero in her own right. A man who I completely dismissed in the first portion of the book becomes gallant and loveable. There is tons of adventure, wrongs that are righted, and misunderstandings explained. Two Moon Princess had an ending that I felt was "just right".
bkwormblogger on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Our story takes us on an adventure of Princess Andrea. Stubborn and hearty she wants to be a Page only to have her father turn down her request. He wants her to join her mother and learn to be a Lady as is fitting of her status.Andrea is gutsy, intelligent and quick witted. She meets her Uncle at some rocks near a beach and is soon to discover that the cave/archway is actually a portal to another world. Andrea resumes her life and learns her Lady skills to a degree but she is not completely happy in her world.When she accidently goes over to the other side she meets her Uncle again and discovers his other life, meets his daughter and gets to know John, a boy that catches her fancy.This book captured me from the beginning and I was expecting something else if I'm honest. It started like Alanna by Tamora Pierce and ended completely NOT like Alanna.I thought the descriptive writing was superb, this author has such a flare for english and can captivate you with the story.It doesn't matter that some of the characters are downright annoying (Kelsey for instance) I think that was the authors intention.Andrea does at times act much younger than her age, she is sometimes a little slow (but we can forgive that) and she's impulsive. But that's what I like in a heroine. She's still growing up after all. Altogether I thought it was a great read. I'm not sure about the target market as originally I though 10-12 years, but then ended up being 14-16 years, however I'm sure the older audience will enjoy this book also. Thank you to Net Galley for allowing me to read this exceptional book!
Jibar on LibraryThing 21 days ago
So, when I started the book I was a little underwhelmed to be quite honest. I wasn't sure I would like it when I requested the Galley, but it did sound interesting.Then, I started to read and after a while it really grew on me.The plot of one or more parallel worlds isn't new, but it was executed well enough and backed with "fact" (I didn't check whether it checks out, but it does sounds geniune). Actually, I thought most of the novel would take place in California. Although, now when I re-read the synopsis it's kind of obvious that most of the novel takes place in the "country" Xaren-Ra.I'm having a hard time finding things to criticize, although the novel wasn't "readreadreadread" like some others were this year. It was a good read, it kept me entertained, even though it seemed to be kind of slow sometimes. Don't get me wrong, a lot of stuff happens in it, sometimes several months are covered in one chapter but it dragged sometimes.But the last few hundred of pages I read with ease, I desperately wanted to know with whom Andrea would "end up" because my suspects continually changed ranks, which is a good thing. I hate it when the boyfriend is predictable. Oh and Andrea's (royal) family! So much coldness ... Andrea being afraid of her parents, having such a cold mother and such a *insert unflattering word* for a sister. Definitely not an easy family to deal with. I think she managed all right. She's 17, she was bound to be jealous and most probably fall in love with the first guy she's not related to ... or something like that.In any case, if you like romance novels with a touch of fantasy (although the only fantasy is really the fact that two worlds exist obliviously next to each other) and like princesses, this novel is definitely for you!But for me, there ought to be more sci fi and more fantasy -- I can't blame the novel for this fact, though. I knew it isn't the usual story I read and I liked it. But I don't usually go out of my comfort zone like that. So I probably won't be repeating this experience. I'm trying to be objective. I liked it enough to consider buying it, but not enough to pick up other books with the same genre description.
cleoppa on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Was bored almost from the beginning. Read some reviews and decided to keep slogging through it. I finally read about half of it and just couldn't finish it. The characters seem so stereotypes. It's like the author said, "I want the sisters to be different. This sister will be the mean sister, this sister will be the sweet sister, this sister will be confiding sister." I mean, Jane Austen created unique sisters that were real characters. These just felt like stereotypes. And that's sort of how the whole book went.
theepicrat on LibraryThing 21 days ago
As the youngest out of four princesses, Andrea does not have to worry about ruling the kingdom any time soon. She'd much prefer to be a knight anyway. Yet her parents want her to start focusing on being a lady as polished and desirable as her sisters. Instead Andrea decides to run away and somehow gets transported to modern-day California. When she returns back home, Andrea finds out that her father has engaged in a war with a neighboring kingdom over a broken engagement. Will Andrea be able to save the kingdom and fix the enemy king's broken heart by promising to share the secret entry to another world?Two Moon Princess starts off slow to the point that I kept wondering where the story was heading. Her California experience was not terribly exciting. I expected a 90210-type deal, but Andrea did not stay that long to fully experience this new world. I did not really get into the story until 2/3 into the book when Andrea returns home and tries to stop a war. This was partly due to the romance that unfolded and tugged at my heartstrings as someone finally saw Andrea for herself - not quite ladylike, not quite knightly, but wholly courageous and strong and beautiful - and loved her. I am curious to see how the sequel plays out for Andrea and the two worlds.
alana_leigh on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Two Moon Princess by Carmen Ferreiro-Esteban is a time/space traveling YA fantasy novel, colored with the influence of Spanish culture and Californian history. Princess Andrea, the fourth and youngest daughter of the King and Queen, dreams of being a knight but fears her father will not allow her to continue her training now that she's getting older. As suspected, even after she wins an archery contest, Andrea is told that it is now time for her to set such masculine things aside and study to be a lady with her mother's guidance. What the king says is law, so really the only thing that will get her out of this is a magic portal to another universe. Funny how that can happen in fantasy novels, right? After struggling to be what she is not, Andrea discovers her kingdom's long-hidden secret, a portal that opens once a month and allows travelers to pass between worlds. Of course, she doesn't totally know what it is until she stumbles through to present day California, where the slightly strange uncle (who would occasionally visit court for short sojourns) turns out to be from this (the real/reader's) world and he's not terribly pleased to have his otherworld niece suddenly appear. In addition, Andrea's mom is actually from California and chose to stay in the other universe for love of Andrea's father, but her uncle bops back and forth between the two worlds, writing off his long absences from his University of California archaeology professorship as "time in the field." Her uncle insists that Andrea must go back to her country/universe when the portal opens again, but that means she's got a month to explore life in our world. As Andrea acclimatizes to California (it helps that her people have ridiculously awesome memories that allow her to learn English practically overnight) and its ways, she begins to appreciate the freedom this world can offer that would be denied to her back home, no matter her station. Unfortunately, though, even when she's given permission by her parents to stay in California for a while, a mistake lands Andrea and her California crush, John, back in her former home and the ultimate consequences of this action lead to war within her world. Now it's up to Andrea to find a way to stop the war and along the way, she discovers that not everything in her world is worth leaving behind, but she ultimately will have to choose between the two.First off, I really wanted to like this book. I was looking forward to the incorporation of old Spanish culture and California history. As a former California Catholic school student, the missions were a big part of grade school curriculum (my small-scale foam-board mission, btw, rocked the socks off everyone else's in the school) and I still have a soft spot for this morally questionable part of my culture. At least with the mission component in this book, I wasn't too disappointed -- these bits and the flavor they provided were interesting and I wanted more. Unfortunately, it was everything else that got annoying. Time was all wonky -- in Andrea's world (which has two moons, btw, hence the title) the calendar is longer and so she starts the book as "nearly fourteen," but in our world, this mean she's seventeen. (Let me tell you that it's a BIG difference for a reader when she blithely reads along, picturing a fourteen-year-old and then suddenly she's enrolled in college classes and thinking about kissing boys in a this-isn't-too-soon-at-all kind of way.) It was also frustrating to know the whole "the portal only opens every month" bit meant that lots of time gets skimmed over in the course of the story and it seems just a little too convenient that no one (like her uncle's real-world daughter, perhaps?) gets all that concerned when someone is unreachable for a whole frickin' month. In general, I found that this story tended to drag on in places (for the first half, I came amazingly close to setting the book aside because things were going so slowly an
ilikethesebooks on LibraryThing 21 days ago
This book is difficult for me to review because I was kind of all over the place with it. Some parts were slow, others were super fast. Some parts made my mad, others made me smile. Some characters I liked, some I didn't, some I just didn't get. Overall though, it was entertaining, and if you like these types of books, you'll like this one.Two Moon Princess follows the life of Andrea, the fourth born princess, right on the verge of her fourteenth birthday, the day when she will become a lady. Just one problem - Andrea wants anything but to become a lady. What she really wants is her family's permission to be a knight. But her father, the king, is dead set against that idea, and once the king makes up his mind, it is practically written in stone.After Andrea finds a magic portal that transports her from her Medieval world, to modern-day California, Andrea's eyes are opened. She never wants to leave. However, her trip is ended prematurely once she accidentally transports herself back to her kingdom....To her shock and dismay, her return has unexpected consequences of huge proportions.Two Moon Princess is about finding your place in a world you don't quite belong in, and learning to never give up your wants and needs to please someone else. I really liked the plot - it was different and intriguing. I thought the most interesting part about it is the culture shock Andrea faces upon returning to her homeland. It just goes to show how much she doesn't belong there. I think my problem with this book was strictly with some of the characters. I liked Andrea, she was headstrong, persevering, brave and funny. However, I did not like her parents or her uncle. Her uncle was just overly hypocritical (if you read the book you'll see why). The problem with her mother and father were that they didn't seem to really love Andrea. I know that realistic to the time, a fourth daughter would be used for political tactics, such as marriages, but you would still love your child. Maybe I understand her dad, but her mother? (I don't want to spoil a key plot point, but her mother should act differently considering...)The ending and unexpected romances did makeup partly for the characters I didn't understand. The ending was sweet, it made my mouth hurt from smiling (and got me weird stares in study hall). I mostly enjoyed this book, but I feel like it was more geared towards middle graders. If you love backwards princess tales (when the character wishes she wasn't a princess, rather than wishing she was), give this one a shot.
Bibliotropic on LibraryThing 21 days ago
I tend to like stories that have the "two worlds colide" theme going on, so when I heard about Two Moon Princess, I thought that it would be a YA book that's right up my alley.Unfortunately, it turned out to have some glaring oversights and flaws that turned what could have been a good book into one that straddles the line between "merely okay" and "blah."Princess Andrea is a girl who would much rather be a knight than a lady, and even though she seems to have the talent for it, she's denied the chance to pursue knightly training by her parents. Frustrated with her family and the way they keep trying to force her into a place for which she isn't suited, she runs away. And through a magic gateway, finds herself in modern California.It's not a story that hasn't been done before, and it doesn't see that the author did much with it that was new... unless you could the fact that Andrea was a spoiled girl who didn't know half of what she thought she did. She runs off with half-formed plans in her head and is so sure she's right about everything she does. Most of the time when characters do this, it's because they actually do know something that other people don't. In Andrea's case, it was repeatedly demonstrated to her that she doesn't know half of what's going on, that her elders actually do have a better grasp of the situation and do have experience backing what they tell her. It's not often you'll find an author who essentially says, "Yeah, kids, you really ought to listen to your parents sometimes because they may actually know what they're talking about." Sometimes adults may have appeared harsh in their treatment of Andrea, but quite honestly, I read that as them losing their patience with her determined ignorance and self-righteous attitude.The romance, at least, was also more believable than I see in many YA novels. Andrea doesn't fall head-over-heels for an impossibly handsome guy. She gets a crush... and that doesn't work out so well. She meets another guy, and crazy event stake priority, and only when she thinks she'll lose him does she start to think that she really doesn't want to. She has teenage overreactions regarding him. It was quite realistic in its portrayal of teenager affection, actually.But what really killed this book for me was the sheer amount of suspension of disbelief required. Andrea lives on another world, and her ancestors came from earth hundreds of years ago, and there are magical doorways between the worlds. Fine, that much I can accept. That's not outside my capabilities. But when a woman from this world, who trained as a doctor, who has been in the world of Gothia for 20-30 years or so, gives somebody antibiotic pills she brought with her and hid the whole time, I start to question whether the author even knows that medications have expiration dates for a reason. And when a culture has been around for over a millennium, has tamed horses and built castles with functioning drawbridges and can make good swords and armour, why is it that it took an engineering genius "who's far ahead of tis time" to build that society's first bridge over a river? They can make a drawbridge, but not a regular bridge? It smacked of clumsy editing and fact-checking, an oversight that nobody expected readers to even notice.But even if a lot of the oversights were fixed, this book still wouldn't be anything special. Not bad, but not anything that would stick out in my mind as being worthy of attention.I might recommend this book to girls between the ages of 10 and 12. Maybe. There are plenty of books, though, that I could recommend to someone in that category that are far better than Two Moon Princess, though. It could have been so much better than it was.
BookAddictDiary on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Two Moon Princess isn't what I expected. Instead of being treated to some sort of sappy teen romance, I explored the world of a young woman who finds herself caught between two worlds and struggling to find her place. Though romance is an element of Two Moon Princess, it's certainly not the key element. More than anything else, Two Moon Princess explores the very real issues that teens deal with (caught between duty and desire) and presents a fascinating character that readers can relate to. In Two Moon Princess, readers are introduced to young Andrea, a stubborn princess from a medieval land who would rather be a knight. Rather than accepting her duties, Andrea prefers to defy her parents and her duty for her own somewhat selfish reasons. She finds her way to modern-day California where she encounters a completely different world than she one she's ever known -and possibly a place where she can be free to make her own choices. But, her destiny pulls her back to her home world, where she finds that there's more to life than just getting what she wants.For me, Two Moon Princess was all about Andrea's personal conflicts and her growth. Though I'm older than the novel's target audience, Andrea took me back to my teen days, and even I found her plight understandable and easy to relate to. Author Cameren Ferrerio-Estevan does an excellent job of creating a likable character with real issues and, even more amazingly, a character who goes through believable growth and honest development throughout the novel. Though, yes, Two Moon Princess is yet another coming of age story (yeah, not exactly an original concept), there's enough of a twist on it to keep readers interested. And, honestly, Andrea's growth managed to be moving and entertaining at the same time. A worthwhile read
SDPogue on LibraryThing 21 days ago
It took a little work but not much to get into this story. I wasn¿t sure what to think about it at first and then suddenly I was swept away and could not put it down. This is the story of Princess Andrea. A mix of coming of age with science fiction with fantasy and rounded out by a touch of romance. Andrea wants to become a knight. As the fourth daughter she has no claim to the throne and wants nothing to do with being a lady. Her parents refuse her request and so she sets off on her own adventure. Wild and high spirited, Andrea finds herself leaving her world and entering California. She learns that nothing is what she thought it was. Upon returning home, she inadvertently starts a war which she has to work to stop. What I liked best was that Andrea had a fairly immature view of the world and it surprised her as she matured. I loved her confusion and the fact that she was unsure of herself, even right up to the end. She was real and insecure. There were some language issues but I only noticed them early on, the story completely sucked me in. I was uncertain of everyone¿s motivation and, while I guessed who would be her love interest, I was still surprised by each turn of events. I would love to read more and see where her next adventure takes her.
Novelreaction on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Two Moon Princess by Carmen Ferreiro-Esteban is about Princess Andrea, while the life a princess seems pretty posh to most people, all Andrea wants to be is a knight. After winning an archery contest, Andrea is sure she is finally going to be able to become a squire when she is informed by her father, the King, that it is time for her to put away her foolish dreams and learn to be a lady of the court. Andrea decides to run away and accidentally finds herself in a different world, literally traveling through a portal from the world she knows to our world. Andrea finds herself fitting into our society without too much trouble and comes to love the freedom to be who she wants to when she once again accidentally travels through the portal, returning home. Only the home she has returned to is on the brink of war with its neighbor and the only one who seems to be able to stop the war is Andrea. Will she find the courage to do what needs to be done in her world? Will she be able to see past her own pain and fears to realize the future of both kingdoms hinge upon her actions? What happens when you live in another world for a time and return to your home and realize that you don¿t fit in any more? Read and find out!I really liked the combination of medieval society and our current society, the obvious differences between the two and the subtle similarities. Andrea¿s decisions annoyed me at times, the obvious correct choices were there but she kept making the wrong choices and having to go back and fix them. However, I think the reason they annoyed me is because I am like that, in hind sight the perfect choice was in front of me but I refused to see it. I did like how Andrea¿s perceptions of the people around her changed as she started to realize it wasn¿t all about her but a much greater picture, especially her relationship with her mother. I also really liked how Andrea refused to accept there was nothing she could do about the situations she found herself in and once she made a decision she went for it. I recommend picking up a copy and reading about her journey yourself.
Bookworm_Lisa on LibraryThing 21 days ago
Andrea is the fourth daughter of a King and Queen on a different world. It is fashioned just like a medieval Kingdom of Earth. It turns out that centuries ago some Spaniards had escaped through a door between worlds. They were escaping the Arabians.They colonized their new planet and did not have contact with Earth. As Earth's society grew and evolved into a technological society, this planet's remained more stagnant.Andrea doesn't fit into the society pressed upon her. She wants to be a Knight, but is refused. She hates being a lady. One evening she is told a little about her planets history and starts to figure out where a portal is. She then finds herself in modern day California.She loves her life in California. She is going to a University and being treated as an equal. She has family living there, you would have to read the book to find out how, it's quite and interesting little twist in the story. She makes friends and falls in love. Then one evening she accidentally finds herself at home. Because of some of her decisions, war is started. She feels the blame and tries to help negotiate peace.Andrea learns some painful lessons about growing up. She changes her mind about being a Knight after seeing war up close and personal. I found that this is the way with most Young Adults, as you learn and grow and have experiences, you are able to understand what it is that you would really like to do with your life, what will work for you and what will not.The romance is not forced, and Andrea has her heart broken a few times. This is also typical for Young Adults. I found this to be a fun book to read. I enjoyed it. Yes, in a few places it is slow and some of the main characters are not always nice. Overall, I found it to be refreshing and enjoyable. It is squeaky clean.
wordforteens More than 1 year ago
Two Moon Princess is one of the books where the world and the plot are better than the characters placed into them. At first, I absolutely adored Andrea. Any story that involves a headstrong princess who wants to be a knight? Hell yeah, I'm in! But her character quickly jumped around. She didn't stick to one kind of person - she was the headstrong knight, than the logical princess who just wanted out, then the well behaved princess who dreamed of a better life, then this, then that. It was like this with most of the characters. There was little character development in any of the characters, and the main characters tended to switch personalities like they switched jackets. I can tell you maybe one consistent thing about each character off the top of my head - and I'm writing this five minutes after finishing the story. Characters are a huge part of the story to me. This time, they let me down. I'm not going to say the world and the plot made up for it - they didn't; I do love me some strong characters. But the story is worth reading for the plot and world alone. I loved the idea of being able to transport into another world. I loved how Carmen tied in how Andrea's people came to be with the history of our world. And the plot? I thought it was brilliantly well done, though some of the scenes at the beginning were either unnecessary or jumpy. All in all, it's not a bad book. It's rather interesting, actually, in terms of world and plot. But I wasn't sucked into it, and with everything else that's out there, I can't say it stands out.
ImaginaryReads More than 1 year ago
Like many girls, Andrea doesn't want to act like a girly girl. She yearns to be a knight whereas her parents expect her to act like the fourth princess that she is. It is when she crosses over to our world that she finally feels as though she is somewhere she belongs; only, she returns too early and to a home more unfamiliar to her than before, for her actions have become the catalyst for war. The characters aren't all nice. There are many misunderstandings that could have been resolved if only characters opened up and said what was really on their mind; however, real life isn't easy. When I became frustrated with characters, I asked myself how I would have acted in their positions, and I couldn't hate them as much as I wanted. There is romance. It is sweet; it is bitter. Andreas has her heart broken a couple times. Two Moon Princess is a coming-of-age story. It is unique and intriguing. It is about growing out of childhood dreams and realizing who you really want to become. War opens Andrea to the brutal reality of knighthood, and she learns more about what she wants to do with her life over the course of the novel. I recommend this for tweens, who will be able to relate to Andrea's struggles relating to her self-identity and getting the people around her to see her for who she really is.
RtBBlog More than 1 year ago
Posted on Romancing the Book's blog Reviewed by Sabrina Review Copy Provided by a Contest Win This was an easy book to get into. The story was told from first person POV and her voice was young and fresh and really natural. The ideas were interesting. Alternate worlds connected to this one, loving the wrong man, learning how to run a kingdom and be a lady when its the last thing you want to do. These ideas are classic for a reason- its hard to go wrong with them. The author did not go wrong. There was nothing wrong with this book. It just kinda… went by. There was no big battle scenes, there was no great romance scenes or anything that would make this book a reread. When I finished the book, I knew that I liked it, but I wasn’t sure what I would rate it. Someone who reads YA fantasy a lot would find the same things off about it that I did. Someone who reads them occasionally or someone that doesn’t read all that often would not understand my concerns. So I went to my read buddy. She asked a simple question, “Would you reread it?” The simplicity in my answer really cleared up my issues. Again, there is NOTHING wrong with this book. It wasn’t a bad book. There was just nothing that stood out to me. I hope that I am able to read another book by her and see that her writing has grown.
MsGlam More than 1 year ago
This book is more geared for middle school age children as it explains simple things throughout the story that an older child or adult would know or get the reference without the explanation however this did not take away from the story and I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I loved Andrea, she is a strong-willed and stubborn character not at all the frilly fou-fou princess I was expecting. This book is challenging to write as my emotions varied with this book. The beginning was slow but once Andrea began her adventure the story picked up. Also Andrea went from 14yrs to 17 yrs old (due to the different time when she entered the other world) and her maturity level did not reflect this change in age which could be explained as the foreignness of her new environment in some instances. There were parts of the book that confused me and scenes that I didn't quite understand the point but all in all I enjoyed tagging along on Andrea's adventure mainly because I liked Andrea as a character.
epicrat More than 1 year ago
As the youngest out of four princesses, Andrea does not have to worry about ruling the kingdom any time soon. She'd much prefer to be a knight anyway. Yet her parents want her to start focusing on being a lady as polished and desirable as her sisters. Instead Andrea decides to run away and somehow gets transported to modern-day California. When she returns back home, Andrea finds out that her father has engaged in a war with a neighboring kingdom over a broken engagement. Will Andrea be able to save the kingdom and fix the enemy king's broken heart by promising to share the secret entry to another world? Two Moon Princess starts off slow to the point that I kept wondering where the story was heading. Her California experience was not terribly exciting. I expected a 90210-type deal, but Andrea did not stay that long to fully experience this new world. I did not really get into the story until 2/3 into the book when Andrea returns home and tries to stop a war. This was partly due to the romance that unfolded and tugged at my heartstrings as someone finally saw Andrea for herself - not quite ladylike, not quite knightly, but wholly courageous and strong and beautiful - and loved her. I am curious to see how the sequel plays out for Andrea and the two worlds.
pagese More than 1 year ago
This is a hard book to review. It was an easy read, but there are elements of the story that didn't flow well, and the characters can be hard to like. But, I enjoyed the premise, and thus found the entire story enjoyable. Andrea was hard-headed and extremely stubborn. For the most part this benefited who she was and what she wanted to do. She's not the princess we usually see in fairy tales. She has no desire to learn to be a lady and would be considered a tomboy (and that's putting it mildly). But there were times I really wanted to yell at her. She has a habit of thinking something was a great idea and going with it. She doesn't bother to think about the consequences and how her actions might effect others. I think so many things could have been avoided if she would just stop and ask herself a couple questions before proceeding. But then we wouldn't have much of a story. The supporting cast of characters was a mix. John was an interesting character when he was in California. Stick him in Andrea's world and all of a sudden he became the guy I wished would disappear. He thought it was all a game and so he never realized what was at stake. Andrea's father...I disliked immensely. He was just as stubborn as Andrea and wanted such a different life for her. Not to mention that he was such a man in so many ways. I loved Don Julian and his brother Alfonso. They both brought a lot of life to the story. I had a feeling there was something more to Don Julian and was glad to discover in the end that I was right. I actually didn't care much for that part were Andrea is in California. I didn't find in believable that she managed to fit in there so easily and in so little time. I don't think a princess who leaves in a mid-evil like era could come to modern California, fit in, learn English, etc all in a few months time. But, it was necessary to the story. She learns about who her ancestors could have been (they are suppose to have crossed over from our world centuries ago). An interesting story overall. I just saw that this is labeled an book 1, so I'm curious as to were the story goes from here. There are possibilities, just not sure how interested I am in reading it.
NovelReaction More than 1 year ago
Two Moon Princess by Carmen Ferreiro-Esteban is about Princess Andrea, while the life a princess seems pretty posh to most people, all Andrea wants to be is a knight. After winning an archery contest, Andrea is sure she is finally going to be able to become a squire when she is informed by her father, the King, that it is time for her to put away her foolish dreams and learn to be a lady of the court. Andrea decides to run away and accidentally finds herself in a different world, literally traveling through a portal from the world she knows to our world. Andrea finds herself fitting into our society without too much trouble and comes to love the freedom to be who she wants to when she once again accidentally travels through the portal, returning home. Only the home she has returned to is on the brink of war with its neighbor and the only one who seems to be able to stop the war is Andrea. Will she find the courage to do what needs to be done in her world? Will she be able to see past her own pain and fears to realize the future of both kingdoms hinge upon her actions? What happens when you live in another world for a time and return to your home and realize that you don't fit in any more? Read and find out! I really liked the combination of medieval society and our current society, the obvious differences between the two and the subtle similarities. Andrea's decisions annoyed me at times, the obvious correct choices were there but she kept making the wrong choices and having to go back and fix them. However, I think the reason they annoyed me is because I am like that, in hind sight the perfect choice was in front of me but I refused to see it. I did like how Andrea's perceptions of the people around her changed as she started to realize it wasn't all about her but a much greater picture, especially her relationship with her mother. I also really liked how Andrea refused to accept there was nothing she could do about the situations she found herself in and once she made a decision she went for it. I recommend picking up a copy and reading about her journey yourself.
Reads_a_lot More than 1 year ago
I'm not going to say that this wasn't a good book, I truly just think it may not be my particualar style. While most of it was good, I thought that the author rushed a little too much through the entire part where Andrea is in the real world. It wasn't a horrible book, but it was just okay. I can't help but wish I'd waited to get it in paperback.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Andrea is a Princess, but she feels like she doesn't fit in. She wants to join the knights, but her father refuses her request and instructs Andrea to visit her mother for lessons on becoming a lady. Ladyship is boring and uneventful and Andrea tires of her lessons quickly.

On the night of her kingdom's ball, Andrea has had enough of being a princess and decides to run away. She stumbles upon a doorway that leads to modern day California. Xaren-Ra, Andrea's world, resembles medieval Spain, so seeing a new world is an adventure. Andrea adapts to her new fast-paced life in California. She makes friends, attends classes, and starts to fall for a local boy.

During a storm, Andrea takes shelter in the same cave that brought her to California. Only this time she accidentally re-opens the passage, bringing with her an American boy. Andrea's return to her kingdom sets off a chain of events that ignites a war on her world, uncovers family secrets, and endangers her family and friends. Now Andrea has to find a way to stop the war and find her place in her world.

TWO MOON PRINCESS is a wonderful book that kept me up turning its pages and reading well into the night. I was transported into Andrea's world and didn't want to leave. There was never a dull moment or a bland character. The author's parallel worlds were richly described and all the characters grew throughout the story.

Andrea is a great strong character - she recognizes her duty to her kingdom, but also has a bit of a rebellious streak in her. She's not a damsel in distress at all, but at the same time she's not afraid to show her soft side.

This story was full of adventure and the romance was an unexpected surprise. This is a great pick for readers who enjoy fantasy but also great for readers who like romance in their stories. I'm excited to see the author is working on a sequel, which I hope to read soon.