The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J. P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy

The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J. P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy

by Charles R. Morris, Stephen Cole
3.8 7

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The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J. P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Morris does an excellent job of presenting and connecting the many divergent threads that run through the industrial age. The lives of the men profiled intersect in interesting ways as they maneuver through an era of business booms and outrageous fortunes. The writing is crisp, insightful, and witty. Read this as background research for a novel I am reading and found it very helpful. Learned a lot and enjoyed the reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this is not so much about what the title says its about but more about the context in which these men were successful. while interesting it is not what i was looking fir and though i struggled for many months to finish it, it could not hold my interest. i would like to clarify that the book is not do much bad as it is not what it says it is. its like tasting wine when expecting milk... and for that i give it 2 stars.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a keen lover of history and at the humble age of 14, I decided to read a book for my 8th grade project and this was it. I found that Morris spent more time on Carnegie and Gould rather than Morgan and Rockefeller, and when he wasn't talking about the latter two, he was talking about other irrelevant people and machinery not even tied to the four men. Though the middle of the book was very interesting and at times really intense, the first and last chapters were devoted to subjects not even related to the rest of the book, it was that that lost my attention and with 6 pages left in the book, I didn't even bother to finish it. In other words, don't make the mistake I did, DON'T BUY THIS BOOK, for you are sure to waste your money.